What rates do you charge? - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Taking Care of Business

Taking Care of Business
The pen and paper aspects of DV -- put it in writing!


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old July 14th, 2006, 11:18 PM   #16
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Piper City, IL
Posts: 341
Wow -- I just read the dates on the original thread -- didn't realize it was that old. Funny on me...
Philip Gioja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 14th, 2006, 11:59 PM   #17
Slash Rules!
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 4,723
Wow that is old. April 2002? Yeah, I don't even remember if I had a paid gig back then. Hopefully I've learned a fair amount since that time.

By the way, videographers usually go by day rate /half day rate, as opposed to hourly. 5 hours or less is a half day (so yes, sorry, client, that shoot you SWEAR will only take an hour is a half day), more, a full day. I'm told gear (camera, lights, etc.) is supposed to be billed at a flat day rate (e.g. my camera rents for $150 a day, period--this is the way a rental house would do it. The client is renting your gear, are they not? Therefore, you are a rental house), and you can halve your time. Some people don't even do the half day rate--full day or no day.

I've HEARD with editing, some people do charge by the hour, but don't charge AFTER the fact. What I mean is, you estimate that a project will take, say, ten hours, and if you're billing $50 an hour, then you quote $500 as your editing price, as oppposed to saying, "well, I'm $50 an hour, I'll let you know how much you're being charged when I finish."

I guess everyone's different. It's whatever you can get away with (or live with), really.
Josh Bass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 15th, 2006, 12:01 AM   #18
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Cupertino, Ca
Posts: 63
Sorry

for resurecting the thread.. came up in a search.. so.

:-)

David
David Calvin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 15th, 2006, 12:10 AM   #19
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Southwest Idaho, USA
Posts: 3,063
Please, don't be sorry. I think it's kind of fun to see how things have changed. :)
__________________
Lorinda
Lorinda Norton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 15th, 2006, 01:30 PM   #20
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Bass
...
By the way, videographers usually go by day rate /half day rate, as opposed to hourly. 5 hours or less is a half day (so yes, sorry, client, that shoot you SWEAR will only take an hour is a half day), more, a full day. I'm told gear (camera, lights, etc.) is supposed to be billed at a flat day rate (e.g. my camera rents for $150 a day, period--this is the way a rental house would do it. The client is renting your gear, are they not? Therefore, you are a rental house), and you can halve your time. Some people don't even do the half day rate--full day or no day.

I...
Look at it this way - a half day shoot still takes up your whole day in that it prevents from taking the full-day booking for the same day that was the very next phone call you got after committing to this client. Once that day is gone from your inventory it's gone and the client has actually "used up" the same amount of your inventory as if he'd gone ahead and booked the full day.
__________________
Good news, Cousins! This week's chocolate ration is 15 grams!
Steve House is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 15th, 2006, 09:29 PM   #21
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Lake Tarawera, Rotorua, New Zealand
Posts: 233
I totally agree. On a commercial basis this half day concept suits only the hirer. Some times one can be required to work between 11am and 2pm. Some are prepared to pay a whole day as it straddles the day. Others are not.

The sad part is it seems us vidographers suffer the same dilemma world wide. We undervalue and undersell ourselves far too often. (I include myself in this statement)
__________________
Owen
Owen Dawe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 15th, 2006, 10:39 PM   #22
Slash Rules!
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 4,723
Yeah, right now I'd do a half day rate 'cause I don't shoot that often. The chances of me having to turn down a full day from one guy 'cause I've already committed to another guy's half day--slim to none. That's my reasoning. If I became Johnny McShootsalot, then maybe a different story.
Josh Bass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 16th, 2006, 09:10 AM   #23
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Ohio USA
Posts: 222
For my wedding work, I charge a flat rate based on the package selected. The hourly rate varies because the actual time involved varies. Using the flat rate for weddings allows the B&G to budget for the service. The hourly rate is relatively low compared to corporate clients.

For corporate, commercial, etc. clients, I charge $60 per man-hour. That applies to pre-production, production (including camera and operator) and post-production. I don't merely leave a meter running though. I estimate the amount of time for a production so the client will have a ballpark idea of what the cost will be. I let them know that I'll try to bring it in under that estimate but it could run more if the reason for additional time is due to the client.

Sometimes I'll get a request for a lower amount and I agree to it if the project is interesting, fun, or I really want to do it. I don't do the freebies thing anymore. I did a few freebies but what I found, and this is my opinion, is that when you offer to do the work for nothing, the "client" tends to treat the work as worthless or unimportant. They'll jack you around and waste your time. If you make them pay, they have something at risk. They will take the project more seriously if they have cash on the line.

Like some others have mentioned in other threads, some "clients" are tire-kickers and some are shopping by price. Occasionaly, I hear the "XYZ company said they can do it for X number of dollars." I avoid putting down XYZ or engaging the "client" in fee negotiations. I kindly suggest to them that they avoid making a choice based on price, and it comes down to choosing who they like and who they think will take care of their needs the best. I remind them that all videographers are not the same. It's a service, not a commodity.

Jeff
Jeff Emery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 27th, 2006, 01:28 PM   #24
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 1,689
Josh, you are correct, budget your gear seperately from you. I charge $500 a day for me plus I own most my own gear so that is extra. On large format (2/3" CCD cams like Varicam) I charge $800 a day. This is where owning your own gear really pays off.





ash =o)
Ash Greyson is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Taking Care of Business

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:44 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network