how to make a proper "one sheet"? at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Taking Care of Business

Taking Care of Business
The pen and paper aspects of DV -- put it in writing!


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old February 27th, 2007, 12:05 AM   #1
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Saint John, CANADA
Posts: 633
how to make a proper "one sheet"?

my partner pitched a series and he was told he needs a proper "one sheet" for

can someone be so kind to give me or direct me to some guidelines of how to make a proper "one sheet"

thank you
__________________
video : xl2 / letus35xl / bogen 503
photo- canon 1dmkII - bronica etrsi
Andrew Todd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 27th, 2007, 06:29 PM   #2
Trustee
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Boise, Idaho
Posts: 1,997
Wikipedia

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Todd
my partner pitched a series and he was told he needs a proper "one sheet" for

can someone be so kind to give me or direct me to some guidelines of how to make a proper "one sheet"

thank you
As to the format, see here
Quote:
The term "one sheet" refers to a specific size of advertising created to promote a film in the United States, currently 27 x 40 inches, displayed in a portrait format primarily at cinemas. It is what is commonly referred to as a "movie poster" or "film poster". Prior to the 1980s, American movie posters were one inch (27 x 41) larger. In comparison, a "24 sheet" is what is known as a billboard. Film posters sold in general retailing are in "poster size" which is 24 x 36 inches
As to how to lay them out.... I have no clue. Have fun.

jason
Jason Robinson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 27th, 2007, 07:50 PM   #3
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 2,100
Most of Jason's reference I believe is for the feature film business. When I was making DVDs for retail, a one sheet was 8.5x11 layout that would be included in the DVD distributors monthly catalog mailing to retailers.

While art and style was important to get people interested, a lot of it was purely informational. For us, it was stuff like:

DVD Title
Running time
Track list (if applicable)
NTSC or PAL
Label or Production company name
Summary of special features

etc etc. You get the idea. Brick and mortar retailers would need this info to plan where/how they would stock the item, and online retailers want this info for the product database (check out a DVD page on Amazon to get that idea).

How this concept translates for a series for broadcast, I have no idea. Maybe these sheets would be given to network affiliates or syndication buyers? It would be finding out this info that would direct you next. Unfortunately, it sounds like you need to extract this info from somebody who has successfully sold a series...might be difficult.

You could try to fake it, but I'm not sure it would be the thing to do. The executive in question already knows you don't know what you're doing, but to try to fake it might send the message you're just winging the whole thing.
__________________
My Work: nateweaver.net
Nate Weaver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 27th, 2007, 11:59 PM   #4
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,750
Here's my not very helpful reply...

The one sheet you are probably looking for is 8.5 x 11 inches with the following things:
-on glossy paper / looks nice
-double sided
-Front: Ad copy + visuals to grab reader's attention
-The back page would contain a little more detailed information about the show; some one-sheets don't really contain more than a few paragraphs of text
- Reader should have a decent idea of what the show is (you can do this in a paragraph).

-Title
-# of episodes
-length (i.e. half-hour, 22 minutes, 11 minutes)
-Contact info (i.e. phone number, email, address; company name)
-Genre (although this may be implicit)

The one sheet (for broadcast) is a sales document you would use in sales conventions (MIP, NAPTE, MIPCOM, etc.) as something like a brochure. At these sales conferences, you have tens of thousands of sellers all trying to sell their show (and several thousand buyers). One sheets are one of the tools of selling (as well as one-on-one selling, and stalking particular people at bars after the convention is over).

Like other kinds of advertising, it may be good to keep the one sheet simple (no more than a few paragraphs of information).

You should be able to skim over the one-sheet and find out:
Format: # of eps, length
Genre (i.e. preschool 3D animation)
What the show is about
Why you should buy it / selling message

This is what other people have told me.

2- Take a look at some one-sheets here:
http://www.ccientertainment.com/Portfolio.html#null
Glenn Chan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 28th, 2007, 12:32 AM   #5
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 2,100
Not very helpful. Heh. I know a little, Glenn knows more!
__________________
My Work: nateweaver.net
Nate Weaver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 28th, 2007, 05:50 PM   #6
Trustee
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Boise, Idaho
Posts: 1,997
Ahhhh

Now that link is a page full of good looking One Sheets. Very valuable link. Thanks.

jason
Jason Robinson is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Taking Care of Business

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:38 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network