The film look with interlaced cameras: Doctor Who & Dirty Jobs - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Techniques for Independent Production

Techniques for Independent Production
The challenges of creating Digital Cinema and other narrative forms.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old April 6th, 2008, 08:50 AM   #16
New Boot
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: London, UK
Posts: 7
I'm pretty sure they use a Snell and Wilcox ARC150. This is a realtime box of tricks, play it in one end, play it out the other and there you go, filmised.

Cheers, Andrew Parkinson (Colourist, BBC)
Andrew Parkinson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 12th, 2008, 01:14 PM   #17
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cardiff, United Kingdom
Posts: 54
They deinterlace in hardware when they conform the project. They use a Snell & Wilcox Alchemist.

Last edited by Matt Mullins; April 12th, 2008 at 06:53 PM.
Matt Mullins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4th, 2010, 07:03 PM   #18
Trustee
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Cornsay Durham UK
Posts: 1,941
I know this is an old thread but the current BBC spec for filmic look is 1920x1080i at 25np.

I have been told the latest Dr Who ser is shot on sony F35 camera's!
__________________
Over 15 minutes in Broadcast Film and TV production: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1044352/
Gary Nattrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 14th, 2010, 11:41 AM   #19
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Nattrass View Post
I know this is an old thread but the current BBC spec for filmic look is 1920x1080i at 25np.

I have been told the latest Dr Who ser is shot on sony F35 camera's!
Yes, I've also read in several places that the newest series of Doctor Who was shot on Sony F35's. Though opinions vary about the quality of the writing, the newest episodes look absolutely stunning--very cinematic--much more so than the first 4 series.
Bob Drummond is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 15th, 2010, 02:37 AM   #20
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: U.K
Posts: 154
I'm not a huge fan of the newer Dr Who series, but I saw an episode this week and to my eyes it does look way nicer than the previous episodes. They did scream de-interlaced video to me. Digi Beta is a nice format to work with and always looks it's best when it's left at 50i IMO.
__________________
Adrian
http://chillfactorfilms.com
Adrian Frearson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 15th, 2010, 03:00 AM   #21
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 6,781
One issue about shooting interlaced and then filmlooking is that you can't do much about the shutter speed--normally there is no electronic shutter applied (aka 360 degree shutter) vs the 1/48 or 180 degree shutter applied to 24p material. Thus even though 60 or 50i footage can be processed to give the cadence of 24p, it will not have the same look unless the shutter is engaged during capture, something that is not normally done when shooting interlaced. As anyone who has shot 24p footage with a 360 degree/no shutter knows, it creates a somewhat smeary result that reduces the effectiveness of replicating the film look.
__________________
Charles Papert
www.charlespapert.com
Charles Papert is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Techniques for Independent Production

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:05 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network