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Techniques for Independent Production
The challenges of creating Digital Cinema and other narrative forms.


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Old September 26th, 2003, 01:32 PM   #16
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To bastardize Marshall McLuhan's title handle, "The Medium is NOT the Message". This "lecturer" clearly sees the inexorable march of digital technologies into film's domain. Even Kodak, the great bastion of film technology, is giving ground to this march. Their stock lost nearly 18% of its value yesterday as they announced that they will, in essence, refocus their attention from consumer film to digital products (a bit too little, too late in many investors' minds).

Fifty years from now some lecturer, perhaps one of us, will stand before a classroom of eager, young faces and bemoan the gradual loss of two-dimensional digital imaging. We'll wail that the trend towards immersive, holographic entertainment chokes viewers' imaginations, that it does not have the richness of imaging detail that digital 2-D featured, etc.

Time and progress wait for nobody. Buy the fellow a drink (being careful to take note of any post-production requirements he may imminently face) and bring him into the fold by sharing some plug-ins with him.
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Old September 26th, 2003, 02:04 PM   #17
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That drop might be due to cutting dividends by 72% but I've never understood Kodak's management anyway. The WSJ doesn't either.
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Old September 26th, 2003, 02:55 PM   #18
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(off-topic side note): Kodak cut their dividend to channel cash in that new direction.
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Old September 26th, 2003, 05:51 PM   #19
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The speed thing rings a bell...

About a year ago I read this book, by a french philosopher, don't remember the name right now, a great thinker. The point is, he spoke about how society is so keen on speed, how technology propels us in a direction that has to do with making things go faster and faster. We human beings have limits, we cannot just go on and on in that direction, and I think if there is a lesson to learn from filmmaking it is how a work can have this great meaningfulness because time is put into it's making. Let us not loose that.
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Old September 26th, 2003, 06:37 PM   #20
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Speaking of Blair Witch.

The reason this film succeeded was the freakin millions of dollars spent on advertising and hype.

It was an interesting concept, although I didn't really dig it. Did it open up some new ideas? yeah, it did. But as an example of what can be accomplised using VIDEO, I think it is one of the worst examples.

The film that is being released called "In this World" is done with VIDEO and it looks epic. I mean it looks really good. I'm babbling now, leaving work, going to get my son.
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Old September 26th, 2003, 06:50 PM   #21
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Re: The speed thing rings a bell...

<<<-- Originally posted by Ignacio Rodriguez : The point is, he spoke about how society is so keen on speed, how technology propels us in a direction that has to do with making things go faster and faster. We human beings have limits, we cannot just go on and on in that direction, and I think if there is a lesson to learn from filmmaking it is how a work can have this great meaningfulness because time is put into it's making. Let us not loose that. -->>>

See, that was part of the lecturer's point. He was talking about how he used ProTools to do the audio for one of his projects and the work went too fast. He said he was on autopilot through most of the process and it frightened him. He went on to say that during an appearance on some television show Speilberg said that he likes to edit on a flatbed because it's more time-consuming and it gives him time to think about what he's doing.

Me? I'm no Oscar-winning filmmaker, but I just like to take breaks and walk away from editing from time to time. A cup of tea. A walk. A cigarette. I used to work at a music video station where I shot and edited short "comedy" bits and I'd invariably get home from work and think of something I wanted to try as I was falling asleep, so I'd get back in the car and go back to the edit suite in shorts, a T-shirt and Birkenstocks. Thankfully I edit about 20 feet from where I sleep anymore, so when those brink-of-slumber ideas dawn on me I don't have to go out looking silly.

I agree to a point, though. If the process becomes so expedient that you don't have time to think about it too much there's always the chance that you'll make a film that only comes from the most superfcial levels of your consciousness. The meditative quality of a craft can really bring inspiration to the surface. That doesn't mean that sitting at a flatbed is the only way to find your muse, though. Sitting in a hot tub with a frozen drink on a starry night and turning things over in your mind seems to work, too. ;-)
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Old September 26th, 2003, 07:57 PM   #22
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From another Rodriguez: ;-)

Another thing Rodriguez is zealous about is shooting on high-definition digital film. "I shot a bunch of movies on film but I hate film!" he cries. So why do so many directors still use it, I ask. "Because they're stupid," he replies, the note of petulance sounding a bit like a stroppy teenager frustrated with the idiocy of the adult world.

Just an excerpt from
http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/f...p?story=447050
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Old September 26th, 2003, 08:26 PM   #23
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THE STORY PEOPLE... do whatever you can or like with whatever media itīs available to you... Take as long as you want/can/need... (I had a teacher thatīs been making a movie for 8 years... ????)... Do whatever it takes and suits you to tell THE STORY...

But whatever you do, donīt lecture people on which is the better way to do something... or which media is better... or how long should I take... Or how lame are those using video.. or how "artsy" are those using 16mm, or whatever...
I donīt care if you are Robert Rodríguez or Alfred Hitchcock... donīt tell me that your way is the only way... that sounds like religious fanatism...

Thereīs plenty of ways of doing things.. of course some work better than others depending on your goals... And lotīs have proven to be good enough that they become standards..

One thing is for sure... video is making it a lot easier for some of us that just donīt have any other option to give it a try... Or should I spend my whole life sending Scripts waiting for the "chance"... no way..

Enough said.. give me good stories.. I havenīt seen many of those lately anywhere...
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Old September 26th, 2003, 09:20 PM   #24
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Well put.

It's like arguing over music/art/literature styles.

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Old September 27th, 2003, 11:16 AM   #25
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You need to read the book "Art and Filmmaking" by I.P. Daley
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Old October 5th, 2003, 09:10 PM   #26
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Perhaps someone should show him 28 Days Later or one of those
other fine pieces of DV stuff people here turn out every time!

Things like this get me quite sad. Know why? Because he takes
way too much for granted. Take the film industry here in Holland
for example (or the lack thereof). Whe have a filmschool here
which I visited once to see if it was something. From watching
people talk and seeing the things they required I could easily
see they were all in the same "box" so to speak. All the same
mindset, rules to follow etc.

If I ever want to make movies here I'd have a very hard time
getting into that filmschool. Then I'd be learning to make movies
THEY want to see (artsy probably instead of really interesting)
and then start to work somewhere low down in the chain if
I get to work in the business at all which releases only a couple
of movies which in my opinion aren't that great.

Guys like this need to learn that not every place on earth
works like Hollywood. I want to make movies of my own and
the best way (in my opinion) to do that NOW is to do it myself
with my video equipment. And one thing I know for sure is that
a lof of people have commented on how GOOD my episode for
Lady X looked (only talking about the look here) and that
definitely did NOT originate on film. Enough said about that.

We all want to be creative and people like that just want to
hold you back (for some reason, probably fear). As pointed out
were would innovation be if we all were like sheep. I say
be creative, be scary and lets make some beautiful movies/films
whatever!
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Old October 5th, 2003, 09:13 PM   #27
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Actually, he talked about that film in particular and said that the poster should have carried a warning that the images contained within originated on an Atari 2600. Then he did a little dance to show how characters moved on old video game systems.

Personally, I thought the ratty image quality in 28 Days Later was great. I thought it worked with the story really well.

<<<-- Originally posted by Rob Lohman : Perhaps someone should show him 28 Days Later or one of those
other fine pieces of DV stuff people here turn out every time!
-->>>
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Old October 6th, 2003, 12:43 AM   #28
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"28 Days Later" was a fine film, using DV was an interesting artistic choice, and I can't wait to see how great it will look on DVD.

That guy was a friggin' loser. Sorry.

It's that kind of thinking that caused me to drop out of NYU film school after my freshman year. Never looked back. Never missed it.
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Old October 6th, 2003, 11:41 AM   #29
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My little half-brother wants to make films one day as well as I do. (Can't imagine where he gets it?)

He is savings his money (well, my moms money) to go to NY Film Academy Workshop in LA next summer. It is going to cost him over $3000.00 (not including food; lodging, etc).

I told him : Hank. (Yes, his name is Hank; after Hank Aaron) take that cash and buy a camera (Xl1s or DVX100; or whatever else is on market next summer) and start making films.

Does he listen? No.

Just thought I'd add that to your "Dropping out of film school" comment. I personally think film school is a waste of time, er, money.
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Old October 6th, 2003, 11:43 AM   #30
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<<<-- Originally posted by Charles Papert : "28 Days Later" was a fine film, using DV was an interesting artistic choice, and I can't wait to see how great it will look on DVD. -->>>

Me too! I cannot wait for the DVD. It will be great. And I'm a sucker for the zombie film. I'm currently writing a script (one of a few I have going) on my own take on the zombie genre.
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