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Old March 29th, 2004, 11:07 PM   #1
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Magic Bullet or 24p? How better the 24p is?

Ok, 24p is better. But is it possible for a Magic Bullet footage to look like a lot to a 24p one?

Do you know any link to a good Magic Bullet sample video (as deinterlacer)?
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Old March 30th, 2004, 12:24 AM   #2
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Try this article....


http://dv.com/features/features_item.jhtml?LookupId=/xml/feature/2003/christiansen0503
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Old March 31st, 2004, 10:42 AM   #3
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I heard from a couple of people that a MAJOR issue with the 24p cameras is that you must be VERY careful moving the camera and panning.

There are a lot of video stuttering issues it seems.
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Old March 31st, 2004, 12:37 PM   #4
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The same issues apply when shooting film.

The same issues would apply if you tried to convert 60i to 24p.

In all cases, you have to move the camera like a film camera, or risk getting high levels of strobing.
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Old March 31st, 2004, 02:26 PM   #5
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Just a question about moving the camera like a film camera. Would dolly shots produces this strobbing or does this imply more towards fast pans and such.

Thanks
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Old March 31st, 2004, 02:36 PM   #6
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What about simple movements of the actors? Is it true that even with actors Magic Bullet can be a little strobo (which means that strobo can easily be noticed, thought may not look TOO annoying)?

Which one is nearest to the "danger" of strobo effect: MB or 24p? Anybody can answer this?
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Old April 1st, 2004, 12:36 AM   #7
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It all depends on how much they move.

Magic Bullet tries to simulate 24 frames per second. The closer and more accurate it is, the more "strobing" you're going to see.

All camera movement, or, well, any type of movement, whether it's from the camera or an actor or whatever, is capable of causing strobing. You never see it in regular video because regular video is recording 100% of the time -- shooting 60 fields at 1/60 of a second, there is never a moment in time when the camera isn't recording motion. But with film or with 24P video, the camera is "blind" fully half the time. Motion that occurs will be blurred in the frame while it's exposed, and then non-existent during the "blind time", and then pick up again on the next frame -- where it will have moved from where it left off on the last frame. Hence strobing.

The effect is similar to a strobe light. You are moving fluidly, but the short exposure of the strobe makes your movement appear jumpy and staccato.

The same strobing effect is present in feature films, it's just that the camera operators have gotten very skilled in distracting your attention so you don't notice it. Watch the first 10 minutes of the movie "Network" and you'll see the most jarring strobing you'll ever likely see in any movie -- whenever someone's walking through the network offices, the camera tracks with them and the walls and doorframes behind them will strobe VIOLENTLY. But, if you're watching the actor, they stay basically stable in the center of the frame as the camera pans with them, so your eye doesn't watch the strobing background, so you don't notice it so much. But if you look for it, you'll see it, and it's AMAZINGLY stroby. And this film was nominated for an Oscar for best cinematography, so it's no hack job -- it's the way 24-frame-per-second imaging works. You've got to work around it.
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Old April 1st, 2004, 01:56 AM   #8
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My only problem with "The Bullet" is the grain aspect here you go and shoot a fine piece of artwork then all "The Bullet" does is actually rearrange your "Pixels" Pixelization is not my cup of tea.

That is why the cameraman is the one who makes the call in my book not the Editor. If you shoot footage that has a compelling look or feel about it and the story line is great it could be shot on VHS for that matter.

The best movie I give for this is “Reservoir Dogs” Yeah! It’s good bloody mean and down right good setting the record for the most time F#@K was used. Yet, did you notice that it really was only shot in one location and for that matter do you see all the cops or the actual heist? Think of it one location where there was not much around the scene if you recall however you remember the way the action went. That’s filmmaking.
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Old April 26th, 2004, 11:11 AM   #9
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Perhaps using foreground elements will lessen the noticeable look of strobing.

If you are following a character along the street, have foreground elements, (with as shallow of depth as possible) passing in front of the main character.

Just an idea.....I'm a novice.

Trevor
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Old April 27th, 2004, 09:59 PM   #10
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Trevor

I like the idea of action in the foreground it seems that Directors or Producers feel that it detracts from the scene. Whereas you see it movies all the time people passing through the main frame even going on to having the camera catching the action.
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