What post process did The Office (BBC) use? at DVinfo.net

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Old August 29th, 2004, 05:16 AM   #1
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What post process did The Office (BBC) use?

Saw the office. Really funny show.
Comparing the raw footage from the deleted scenes disc with what made it to air, it looks like it was shot on video and a film filter was applied.

A previous post about that here surmised that they used betacam or digibeta.

I figure we can get the same clean high quality look with a DVX100 or a PD170.

Then perhaps go to Magic Bullet with the footage to give it the film look? I mean what they did looks really good, with the film look, it looks like it was shot on a high end 24p camera.

What are some suggestions on how we can make cheap(er) video, such as the DVX100 (or XL2 if it's good) look like film, to be broadcast on TV? A professional post house, or will magicbullit do the trick?
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Old August 29th, 2004, 09:15 AM   #2
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There has been some discussion on this already, see:

http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/showthrea...threadid=23735
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Old August 29th, 2004, 02:05 PM   #3
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Yep, I saw that post. So I've asked questions that are beyond that. Pretty much about the DVX100 and magic bullet I suppose, which is at a MUCH lower price point to the betacam and post production it seems they used.....unless the original post was wrong and they used VX2000's?
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Old September 12th, 2004, 05:30 PM   #4
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I am still interested in getting to the bottom of this. There is no info anywhere! Maybe its kept under wraps becasue it looks so good.

I have a feeling they are pumping the signal thru some sort of hardware and not software soloution like Magic Bullet.

If anyone knows anything else, speak up please.
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Old September 13th, 2004, 12:08 PM   #5
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The office is filmed on high end cameras, not pro-sumer cams like the VX2000 or DVX100. The effect will then be obtained by grading the colour.
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Old September 13th, 2004, 11:44 PM   #6
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Digibeta to be exact. Theres more going on there than color correcting. The motion is completely different
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Old September 14th, 2004, 12:04 AM   #7
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Agreed. Considering that the show was shot nearly 4 years ago, it's a reasonable bet that a "black box" process was used, similar to Filmlook.
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Old September 14th, 2004, 12:26 AM   #8
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Charles,

Do you know if they Filmlook HD films such as Spy kids2, Starwars 2, Once Upon a time in Mexico.

The reason i ask is there are some shows in my country that shoot with f900's and they still look like video.

IMHO Honeslty in these films its hard to tell, (except for star wars, seems a lot sharper)

Anyway thanks for the info. I guess thats that for "The Office".

Maybe we can get Juan from the Uncompressed DVX forums to make us one of them boxes!

CHeers,
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Old September 14th, 2004, 01:56 AM   #9
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The primary component of Filmlook is to convert 60i into, effectively, 24p that has gone through a 3:2 pulldown back to 60i. This is essentially what the DVX100a does in 24p mode, or what Magic Bullet does. The thing is that Filmlook was basically the first to do it (I think I first started using them around '91) and luckily for them, their patent requires camera manufacturers who are making 24p cameras to pay them licensing fees.

Features shot on 24p cameras like the ones you mentioned don't require conversion software to be output to film.

My personal opinion is that the single biggest element in making video look like film is selection of frame rate; I have yet to see 60i look anything like film. But simply shooting in 24p does not guarantee a convincing film look. Lighting and composition has a lot to do with it also.
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