How to Maximize Distribution Options - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Techniques for Independent Production

Techniques for Independent Production
The challenges of creating Digital Cinema and other narrative forms.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old April 26th, 2005, 08:50 PM   #16
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,750
Maybe you don't need high resolution at all?*

Story-wise, it may be better if your film has a gritty look to it rather than looking like Hollywood. Following this logic, it might be better to shoot on 8mm/16mm than to have it look like Hollywood.

You could also think about your shooting style... if you want to do steadicam work, then consider how the camera system lends to manual focus, weight, and depth of field (extremely deep or extremely shallow depth of field may be desireable).

*There are other major differences between 35mm and video. I don't want to mislead anyone into thinking 35mm is better solely/mainly because of higher resolution. There are other factors like exposure latitude, experience (many talented DPs know how to shoot 35mm), money (35mm shoots usually have more), color correction/grading (often done for 35mm; rarely done for video), how film handles highlights, lack of video-specific artifacts, grain, etc.

2- Color grading can also help improve the look of your footage immensely. Check out BBC/Top Gear (do a search in the film look forum).
Glenn Chan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 26th, 2005, 11:19 PM   #17
MPS Digital Studios
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Palm Beach County, Florida
Posts: 8,531
Good to hear, Pete. Best of luck to ya!

heath
__________________
My Final Cut Pro X blog
Heath McKnight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2005, 11:41 AM   #18
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 356
I wouldn't suggest 8mm - you will have a very hard time selling beyond DVD.

From what my contacts tell me, most distributors (particularly foreign distributors) are still looking for film projects, but will consider HD, especially if the material is good. You have a low budget (and it sounds like you're aiming high for how much you have to spend) but your ROI would likely be much better if you shot on S16 rather than HD.

However, if prosumer HD is what you can afford and not much more, and you're willing to wait until the HVX comes out at the end of the year, it's probably your best bet at the moment. It will lower your chances of theatrical distribution, but it won't wipe them out completely. I think you will need some sort of mini35 device. DOF does help in conveying the idea of the film look - even though you might loose a stop or two, I think 1/3" camera will definitely need it.

I'm here in Houston too. If you need any help when it comes time to shoot, let me know.
Joshua Starnes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2005, 11:52 AM   #19
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 331
Quote:
DOF does help in conveying the idea of the film look - even though you might loose a stop or two, I think 1/3" camera will definitely need it.
I've had no problems achieveing shallow DOF on video even with smaller CCDs like the GL2. It's not as easy as with film cameras, but it can be done without any special adapters.
Pete Wilie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2005, 11:55 AM   #20
MPS Digital Studios
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Palm Beach County, Florida
Posts: 8,531
I get shallow DOF by zooming in on my subject from around 5 - 10 feet away. Looks good! This includes the DVX100A and the FX1.

heath
__________________
My Final Cut Pro X blog
Heath McKnight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28th, 2005, 01:09 PM   #21
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 356
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete Wilie
I've had no problems achieveing shallow DOF on video even with smaller CCDs like the GL2. It's not as easy as with film cameras, but it can be done without any special adapters.
Yeah, I've done it with a TRV-900, but it's cumbersome and not as good and limiting in camera movement. Focusing in close on something (like say an item on a table) with a shallow DOF on a table, then craning back real fast while changing focus to keep the new angle in focus? Forget about it. It's doable, but for slightly more money, it can look better and be easier to work with.

It's just my opinion, but it seems to my eye to present a better image (insofar as what standard film images look like) and easier work flow for dyanmic camera movement without having to deal with changing the focal length of your lens in the middle of the shot or problems in cramped interiors or any of that. But you would know your needs better than I would.
Joshua Starnes is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Techniques for Independent Production

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:15 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network