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Old March 13th, 2011, 08:47 PM   #16
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Re: Sliders, Sliders everywhere but which way to go?

Too bad they don't list a weight capacity. I'm thinking about it for an EX1. It's probably beefy enough for that.
The 350 is a lot heavier. Maybe email them?
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Old March 14th, 2011, 07:03 AM   #17
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Re: Sliders, Sliders everywhere but which way to go?

I have send an email to many slider producers,problem is they want to sell..so they all answer: yes we have test it with heavier camera and it works great!!! they are running a business based on selling these things.
I just need to find one independent videographer that uses slider with heavy camera...can't find any!!..
maybe I just have to buy one and test it, here in Italy no one rents sliders or maybe I can't find anyone that does...I have tried to contact Dana dolly (not a real slider but maybe best solution for heavy camera) but they didn't even bother to answer me..maybe because they don't ship international so they don't care for clients from board!! or maybe I'm wrong..
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Old May 14th, 2011, 12:38 AM   #18
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Re: Sliders, Sliders everywhere but which way to go?

Robert-

I have the 24PHD- Motion Slider 24 Camera Slider and I do have buyer's remorse on it. I used it for my 5DM2 and I have to say the head on it has quite a bit of play in it. I suppose with some customization you could make it a bit tighter, but it's got jerk and wobble if you don't use it just right. It's caused me to have to do 4-5 different takes of things. The action is not very smooth. Definitely involves some expertise in the wrists and a steady push.

I'm not saying it's impossible or terrible, but definitely for me requires more work getting it just right then probably other sliders out there.

I went to a camera store recently and tried out the Kessler Pocket Dolly. Holy cow if I had just a bit extra coin I'd totally rather have that over that cheapo one I bought.
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Old May 21st, 2011, 01:45 AM   #19
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Re: Sliders, Sliders everywhere but which way to go?

I bought the Konova. It arrived from Korea in a couple of days to the UK and was a real surprise. Comes in a smart carry case that itself has evidence of careful design (special vertical zips to open one end) as well as zips along the length. Two well made screw-on feet are included in the bag, a full set of tools to adjust the slider head, including pliers to pull out the locking rings for friction adjustment, and good instructions.

The slider itself is very well made. The engineering is really good (I have some engineering experience), and there are little touches that make me think that although this is a 'budget' device, that the designers cared about the way it would work - so they have included two little nylon clip-in sliding lightly oiled 'buffers' that you can use to clean the sliding track before use, pull out and wipe off, then reinsert. These sit on oeither side of the sliding head and protect the ends of the sliding head when you get to the end of the track.

So far so good. However its how it works that counts. I loaded it with an Acratech Ultimate ballhead (brilliant - good size and strength for use on a slider, weighs less than 1lb but supports a huge amount) and a 7D with 24-70 f2.8 lens and it slid beautifully, well controlled and smooth. It felt that it would easily support more weight, and is advertized as holding over 50lbs so I tried the 70-200 f2.8 on the 7D with a lens plate on to support and keep balance - no problem. So I tried a 300 f2.8 and 7D and it slid easily, cleanly and very smoothly and the results were perfectly usable. So it easily holds a decent weight - the latter comob weighs around 9 lbs with head.

Works well vertically, up or down, is nice and stable mounted on a tripod with the centre hole only, is much more stable (obviously) with a tripod at one end and monopod at the other. Can be used hung off a door, and using it at angles off the level - ie rotated 90 degrees longitudinally which is a bit of a test of the bearings, was no problem.

Downsides - its perhaps a bit heavier than some of the lighter aircraft alloy ones - but they cost three to four times as much. The lightly oiled track needs to be kept very clean, but this is easy and pretty normal I'd guess.

I've no connection with the company, but did a lot of reading before I ordered, and had NO experience using a slider ever, so this was my first purchase and usage of one, and a couple of days after it arrived I took it out in earnest and this was the result of using it for a few hours filming:
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Old May 23rd, 2011, 04:19 PM   #20
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Re: Sliders, Sliders everywhere but which way to go?

A forum member here wrote me in an email once regarding sliders. He said: "Seems a lot of money for one trick". That stuck with me, especially being unsure about them for what I do. So, I went and purchased the cheapest I could find first. I decided to snag an IndiSlider Mini. It is what it is and, at the moment, I am glad I didn't go hundreds of dollars in for the one trick. I imagine I will use the slider sparingly. Here is a short video I put together of my first two practice runs:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-hq7CN5mF4

Last edited by Robert James; May 23rd, 2011 at 06:29 PM.
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Old May 24th, 2011, 02:05 PM   #21
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Re: Sliders, Sliders everywhere but which way to go?

The hard part about the cheap sliders is that "one trick" can take a bunch of takes to pull off smoothly. After a while when you are doing your best to keep the base steady while making those movements it starts to waste time when you're doing a commercial shoot or where time is critical. After the headaches I've had with my slider I decided to sell it to someone looking for a great beginner slider and instead go with something that will do the job every time without fail. I want my shots very smooth and when you see these unintentional jerks that happen due to balance being a hair off or whatnot it really makes for frustrating editing because you may not initially see those jerky parts while in motion, but when looking over the footage it's definitely there.
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Old May 24th, 2011, 03:15 PM   #22
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Re: Sliders, Sliders everywhere but which way to go?

I hear you, Ryan. That was a big part of my months of analyzing slider footage online. In the end I saw footage online with jerky motion for the IndiSlider (for $100) just as I did for, say, a Glidetrack Shooter and Konova Slider ($300). Granted, the higher priced may be less jerky but it seemed a bit of patience would save me $$$. At least at the outset.

Now, I wouldn't say the IndiSlider is butter smooth but for the money pulled off some alright moves in about 2-4 tries at worse and on the first go at best from somebody, like me, doing it right out of the box. I am sure those $600 sliders can pull off the "one trick" smoother but for budget folks not working commercial it should be alright.

I'm sure my equipment will up it's game as soon as I do. :p
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Old May 26th, 2011, 03:20 PM   #23
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Re: Sliders, Sliders everywhere but which way to go?

I've just upgraded the carriage on my Igus-based slider to the new Hybrid roller/sleeve carriage made by Glidetrack.
I can't speak highly enough about it. For once, I'm able to perform decent tilts as well as pans during a slide - not always possible before.
I can even use my Canon XF300 on it perfectly - and that's not exactly a light camera.
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