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Old September 13th, 2005, 02:18 PM   #1
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How to speed up recording minutes per day?

Well, I am fairly new in making movies. Since my goal is to make a feature one day I want to know how do I optimize my recording minutes per day. From what I have found out the average movie record 1 minute / 1 page per day but an indie movie is up around 4 - 5 minutes / pages per day. Today I recorded about 20 seconds in 2 - 3 hours. Yeah, we took it easy, drank coffee and goofed a lot so I have some ideas what took time.

What ideas do you have to speed up production?
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Old September 13th, 2005, 03:59 PM   #2
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Good Luck

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fredrik-Larsson
Well, I am fairly new in making movies. Since my goal is to make a feature one day I want to know how do I optimize my recording minutes per day. From what I have found out the average movie record 1 minute / 1 page per day but an indie movie is up around 4 - 5 minutes / pages per day. Today I recorded about 20 seconds in 2 - 3 hours. Yeah, we took it easy, drank coffee and goofed a lot so I have some ideas what took time.

What ideas do you have to speed up production?

Ummmm... DON'T goof off? Also, if you want to go the Lucas route, give yourself a maximum amount of time you want to spend on each scene and stick to it, no matter WHAT happens. Just get it in the cam and move on. :)
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Old September 13th, 2005, 04:20 PM   #3
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It's interesting, but I've noticed that with the ability to shoot virtually unlimited takes on tape... the efficiency, and time IS money, on an indy 'film'(tape) can go through the roof.

Whereas with FILM, you budget your take ratio strictly. And you KNOW you get three shots for instance on this master... and NO MORE. (Okay, barring disaster) Or, maybe the first take was really good, and you feel daring, and move on to the next shot. In this way, with the discipline of filmmaking, a film shoot is FORCED to shoot lean and mean. Storyboarding and rehearsal, all normally done in pre-production at low to no cost, are vitally necessary when you hit the switch and the sound of money starts whirring through the gate...

So, to answer your question without knowing your script or your personal work habits... shoot as if it costs you real money everytime you hit record. Because, one way or another, it does. Pay now, or pay later.
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Old September 13th, 2005, 05:28 PM   #4
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Yeah, good thoughts. I reflected the same way. And like "let the tape roll". My first project had 5 hours tape and resulted basically in 10 minits that sucked... I think I will definately plan a lot more since it also makes you have a checklist so you don't forget anything. And that thought about 3 takes or certain amount of time for a scene and then move on sounds good to.

EDIT: And I will goof of a lot less but I will probably plan for some goofing around time so that the cast will be pleased and less nagging that I am a demanding director...
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Old September 13th, 2005, 06:13 PM   #5
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ScenalyzerLive lets you time your captures in intervals. You'd need the camera on in a mode where it won't turn off and your computer running, so it needs to be somewhere in close proximity to what you are shooting.
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Old September 14th, 2005, 12:36 AM   #6
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I like to do a lot of pre-production/pre-visualization for camera movements, blocking, f/x, non-dress rehearsal, that sort of thing. It cuts down monumentally during shooting because I can be more focused.
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Old September 14th, 2005, 06:37 AM   #7
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Maybe volunteer to work one of the Instant Films projects and take notes.

http://www.instantfilms.tv/make.html

:D
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Old September 14th, 2005, 06:48 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George Ellis
Maybe volunteer to work one of the Instant Films projects and take notes.

http://www.instantfilms.tv/make.html

:D
lol... I would if it were a bit closer... but it must be like 12 - 18 hours by plane from here... so.. I have to learn the hard way... ;)
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Old September 15th, 2005, 02:25 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Wisniewski
I like to do a lot of pre-production/pre-visualization for camera movements, blocking, f/x, non-dress rehearsal, that sort of thing. It cuts down monumentally during shooting because I can be more focused.
AGREED!

I've done projects where we've gone as far as to "shoot" an entire live action scene using CGI simulations ... using a modeled-to-scale version of the set, performers, even camera gear, to make sure we knew how to pull off each shot, where the gear was going to go, what shooting order would be most efficient, etc.

This, and an overall sense of urgency, can make a HUGE difference in how much you can get done in a single shooting day.
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