Filmaking Tutorials software (helpful) at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Techniques for Independent Production

Techniques for Independent Production
The challenges of creating Digital Cinema and other narrative forms.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old February 9th, 2006, 11:44 AM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: London, UK
Posts: 76
Filmaking Tutorials software (helpful)

Hi everyone,

I have came across a 3d filmaking techinique tutorials.

http://www.hollywoodcamerawork.us/mc_sampleclips.html

To be honest I find these tutorial very beneficial - maybe becuase i am a beginer...

What is your opinion on such software?

I have another question, view the first clip titled TRACK PIVOT. You will see a track pivot shot as well as other cameras in the scene giving a over to shoulder shot an a trak pivot shot. I was curious to know, if they are both cameras shoot the scene at a different time to avoid noticing the camera in the background... OR their both shoot at the same time?

Thanks,
JOey
Joey Dee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 9th, 2006, 11:53 AM   #2
Trustee
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Brookline, MA
Posts: 1,447
You just discovered Hollywood Camera Work? They're the best; you can't go wrong with their Master Course...and it's a DVD set, not a software application.
Emre Safak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 9th, 2006, 12:30 PM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: London, UK
Posts: 76
ahh yes a DVD.. sorry about that.. they seem amazingggggg...

So I take it that Hollywood Camera Work have a positive feedback...
Joey Dee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 10th, 2006, 03:43 AM   #4
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Seattle WA USA
Posts: 125
I own it, it's amazing!

I'm actually studying the entire set with some friends, we meet each week to watch it and discuss (there's a lot of information and you could easily watch the entire set several times over and over before you could possibly remember everything!). keep in mind that this is explicitly about blocking/camera moves.

Here's a great review: http://www.dvxuser.com/articles/hollywood/

~Shawn
Shawn Murphy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2006, 08:09 PM   #5
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: London, UK
Posts: 76
Shawn,

That's fantastic.... I've seen the samples on the site and found them to be extremely helpful they were just so intersting to watch. Its very rare to find some good content compiled with visual guidance such as this.

"keep in mind that this is explicitly about blocking/camera moves."

What do you mean by blocking??? meaning blocking the camera from being noticed while filming???

View this image
http://www.dvxuser.com/articles/hollywood/image006.jpg

The line going from the middle of each characters to the other is symbolizes what?

Im not to sure why there is 8 cameras as well :<

Joey :)~
Joey Dee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2006, 08:33 PM   #6
Trustee
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Brookline, MA
Posts: 1,447
Joey,

Blocking refers to the positioning and movement of the talent and camera. The "eight cameras" are the different camera positions suggested to cover the scene.
Emre Safak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2006, 08:34 PM   #7
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Seattle WA USA
Posts: 125
**Emre got it covered, just as I was hitting send (but his post is much more succinct!) ;-)

Blocking basically refers to the planning of the camera placement in relation to the actors movements and any other required elements/objects in a scene.

From the web/Google query:

"Blocking a shot (or scene) the process of figuring out where the camera goes, how the lights will be arranged, and what the actors' positions and movements - moment by moment - are for each shot or take; often, the specific staging of a film's movements are worked out by the director, often with stand-ins and the lighting crew before actual shooting"


*********************************
*********************************

The lines in the picture represent what is called the 180 line, it's an imaginary line that (as a general rule) a camera normally doesn't cross. This concept is covered in-depth in this video series and it covers exceptions to that "rule" and ways in which you can break that guideline more subtly.


*********************************
*********************************

The eight cameras in the picture represent possible camera positions for a given scene, it's not meant to imply that there would be eight cameras going at once (though I've heard of such high numbers in some films, particularly for action sequences).
Shawn Murphy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2006, 08:39 PM   #8
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Seattle WA USA
Posts: 125
Do a quick Google search for this term: "180 degree rule"

The first five or so links have some great explanations of the concept.
Shawn Murphy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 14th, 2006, 09:21 AM   #9
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: London, UK
Posts: 76
Ahh... THanks Shawn and Emre

I know about the 180degree rule I just didnt think to realise that they draw lines my mistake :<

I know Ozu the Japanese director always breaks that convention, its actually pretty cool to see a film which breaks the 180 rule cuz it like gets ur attention right away.

SO this Hollywood Cinema is deff worth it uhh guys???

Right now Im saving a bit of money here to buy a Canon Xl2 with some accessories and I will get this DVD also...

IT would be very interesting to watch these 6 dvds ;)
What else can you guys suggest me? SHould i look into a storyboard software or just OLD FASHION paper and pencil even though im a horrible drawer :<

Joey :>~
Joey Dee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 15th, 2006, 06:11 AM   #10
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey Dee
...

I know about the 180degree rule I just didnt think to realise that they draw lines my mistake :<

I know Ozu the Japanese director always breaks that convention, its actually pretty cool to see a film which breaks the 180 rule cuz it like gets ur attention right away.

SO this Hollywood Cinema is deff worth it uhh guys???

R...
Just FYI - one should never break the "rules" of good technique just to be "cool." Those practices came about because they work to tell the story effectively and going contrary to them usually won't. It's like writing with proper spelling and grammer - if you don't use it, no one will understand what you're trying to say. On the other hand, there are times when one might make a reasoned, artistic choice to break the rules if doing so does a better job of communicating what you're trying to get across than following them would do.

I'll second the recomends for Hollywood Camera Work. They're a very valuable training tool. If purchasing is a bit steep, you might be able to find them for rent from specialist online video rental services like Technical Video Rental. OTOH their purchase price is a lot less than a semester's tuition to film school and if studied carefully probably just as valuable.
__________________
Good news, Cousins! This week's chocolate ration is 15 grams!
Steve House is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 15th, 2006, 07:48 AM   #11
Trustee
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Brookline, MA
Posts: 1,447
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey Dee
SHould i look into a storyboard software or just OLD FASHION paper and pencil even though im a horrible drawer :<
If you don't have to share your storyboard with anyone, you can do it yourself.
Emre Safak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 15th, 2006, 03:06 PM   #12
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: London, UK
Posts: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve House
Just FYI - one should never break the "rules" of good technique just to be "cool."
Steve, Yasujiro Ozu is one of the greatest filmakers of all time. I agree with you to a certain extent. Depending on what the director " auteur " is trying to represent in a film there isn't an obligation to follow a rule, in the films of Ozu he is representing " space " the amount of space between the characters and the camera therefore breaking the 180 rule is relevant.

So back to Hollywood Cinema...

I am deff going to purchase this set of dvds :) As for storyboard im not a great drawer so i will try to play with some free trial softwares

Joey :>
Joey Dee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 15th, 2006, 03:53 PM   #13
Trustee
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Brookline, MA
Posts: 1,447
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey Dee
I am deff going to purchase this set of dvds :) As for storyboard im not a great drawer so i will try to play with some free trial softwares
My drawing ability is at the matchstick-man stage, yet I drew mine own storyboards, because they were only meant as a reminder to myself.
Emre Safak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 15th, 2006, 07:15 PM   #14
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 5,742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey Dee
Steve, Yasujiro Ozu is one of the greatest filmakers of all time. I agree with you to a certain extent. Depending on what the director " auteur " is trying to represent in a film there isn't an obligation to follow a rule, in the films of Ozu he is representing " space " the amount of space between the characters and the camera therefore breaking the 180 rule is relevant.

So back to Hollywood Cinema...

I am deff going to purchase this set of dvds :) As for storyboard im not a great drawer so i will try to play with some free trial softwares

Joey :>
Absolutely, no disagreement. But I'll bet he's doing it for what are very carefully thought-out artistic reasons and it's very unlikely he's doing it just to be "cool." Unfortunately that's what seems to motivate a lot of other folks, especially students.

Crotchity geezer mode off now <grin>
__________________
Good news, Cousins! This week's chocolate ration is 15 grams!
Steve House is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 15th, 2006, 08:12 PM   #15
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: kentucky, USA
Posts: 429
Those DVDs can be rented for a week at a time from here, and sent to your house. Check it out.
http://technicalvideorental.com/inde...x&cPath=109_86
Each of the links for these DVDs covers two disks that are to be rented seperately or together.
Staging high-end scenes (two DVDs)
Stationary blocking (two DVDs)
The moving camera (two DVDs)
That is the entire Master Course!!! (six DVDs)

Last edited by Steve Witt; February 15th, 2006 at 10:05 PM.
Steve Witt is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Techniques for Independent Production

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:31 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network