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Old February 25th, 2003, 01:09 AM   #1
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Film look with Adobe Premier 6.0?

Can anyone help with aquiring the film look from DV with Adobe Premier 6.0? Is there a step by step someone can direct me to to or tell be. I am new to video editing. Much help or advice is appreciated. Thank you. Oh one more thing, how do I deinterlace.
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Old February 25th, 2003, 03:48 AM   #2
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to deinterlace in premier 6, go to export timeline > movie.
Chance the settings and go to special proccessing and click deinterlace.
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Old February 25th, 2003, 07:43 AM   #3
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There is a thread here about deinterlacing. This thread
links in a post by myself to a couple of other threads about
deinterlacing possibilities, software and whatnot.

Please read all that carefully.

Film look (and this wholy depends on how you define
filmlook) is usually a combination of things. Good story, good
actors, good lighting and use of shadows. Camera movement,
frame blocking and motion signatures. A lot can be done in post
on a computer with tools like letterboxing, color correction/timing
and editing. Also don't forget about sound. It is very important
to a movie!

There is no easy button. It usually involves a lot of trial and error,
learning the camera, learning lighting etc. And as I said, it also
depends on what you define by a film look. I prefer to call it a
professional look.
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Old February 25th, 2003, 06:32 PM   #4
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Thanks alot guys. When I said film look, I mean the picture quality, you know where it doesnt look real sharp and clear like home videos.
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Old February 26th, 2003, 05:32 AM   #5
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Hey SAM! Haha, So you found your way over here..
This is AndySwe from your board! (aka: The guy who think your bike is nice) So ZG has found it's way over here, how nice!

Filmlook is mostly about how you shoot when you shoot. You can use filters in Premire/aftereffects but you wont get it nearly as good as if you do it correct from the beginning. Light is a real important factor. To use filters on your camera can do a great deal, I would reccomend that. To use manual controls (focus, shutter) makes your video look somewhat less video. You say you want it to look less sharp.. Softfilter would do the trick! If you cant afford it (because your bike makes a big hole in you wallet) You could use a blur filter (in premiere) and apply a little blur. This is nothing I would do myself but It might work.. (never tried that actually) I know you guys are on a tight budget so I'm going with the inexpensive ways to make it less video. Color correct after your done shooting could also make a big difference. I like to get my video as close to what I want before the picture hit the CCD's if you know what I mean.

There are more talanted people than me when it comes to this. And you will get more good replies. But if you have more questions you are always welcome to email me at andreas@fernbrant.com

Take care and good luck Sam!
/Andy
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Old February 26th, 2003, 10:37 AM   #6
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Sam,

I think the de-interlace trick with multiple video tracks blending
through each-other (links to threads and article in my previous
post above) might actually do what you are looking for.
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Old March 8th, 2003, 09:04 AM   #7
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I understand the "film look" tecnique of putting video on 2 tracks, top track 50%, lower field first, deinterlaced; bottom track upper field first, deinterlaced.

I've also heard one or both tracks should have gaussian blur applied. Any idea how much? I tried 1.0 on one track, and then I tried .5 on both tracks, but I think both attempts made the video too blurry.

Anyone have experience with this? or do you recommend no blur at all?

This is a great website! Thanks!

Bob
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Old March 8th, 2003, 10:38 AM   #8
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I personally would not blur I think. But I've not done much
deinterlacing since I'm shooting frame mode primarely.

Would first try it out without. If that doesn't looks good enough
try playing around a bit with blur and see what happens.
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Old March 10th, 2003, 08:42 PM   #9
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de-interlace

I find deinterlacing forming zaggie borders when I pan,zoom make fast movements. I see it in the tv monitor but not on the PC screen.
t
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Old March 13th, 2003, 10:27 AM   #10
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There is one technique that I like to use. Its similar to the technique that was mentioned above. You’ll need an A/B type editing setup. Lay out the source track audio and video on the upper track and then copy the video only to the lower track so that both video tracks are perfectly aligned. Apply whatever effects you want to the lower track i.e. de-interlace, blur, or my favorite a gaussian blur. The trick here is to soften the resulting picture by mixing both tracks to differing degrees without loosing the underlying structure. You’ll have to fool around with how much to blur the secondary track and how much of that resulting track to mix in with the main track.

I hope this helps
-pat
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Old March 13th, 2003, 06:17 PM   #11
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Thanks again!
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