Intentional camera movement during shot at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Techniques for Independent Production

Techniques for Independent Production
The challenges of creating Digital Cinema and other narrative forms.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old December 19th, 2006, 10:04 AM   #1
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 505
Intentional camera movement during shot

Films and TV Programs such as NYPD Blue and others have pioneered the use of what appears to be handheld camera use for a fixed position camera shot, the idea presumably being to provide a more dynamic appearance.
A couple of questions about this:
1. are these shots actually handheld or using a tripod with pan/tilt movement?
2. can this effect more easily be produced in post?

thanks
Greg
Greg Quinn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 19th, 2006, 04:14 PM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 419
Greg, I've been on the set of FX Networks's "The Shield" various times, which is a police drama. They shoot almost all shots either handheld or steadicam.....and they often replace a shot that would normally be a dolly shot with steadicam shots.

The handhled work on that show is awesome.....if you haven't watched it ever, check it out.
Not sure if this reply helps any, but atleast you know this show utilizes many handheld shots.
Joe Allen Rosenberger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 19th, 2006, 04:29 PM   #3
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 2,100
Film folks shoot handheld all the time.

Usually the intention is to give the impression of a bystanders POV. A handheld shot has a more "you're there" feeling...rather than the omniscent viewer feel given by supported, smooth shots.

And no, this sort of thing is not easier in post.

There's been a few shows out there that have used a style called "fishing", where the operator feigns a sort of ADD when it comes to what they're trying to focus on in the frame...and this can be done from a head. The give away that they're doing it from a head is if there's no movement in the roll axis. True handheld stuff almost always has a little bit of roll.

Fishing is also done truly handheld too...watch some Battlestar Galactica to see this technique overused.
__________________
My Work: nateweaver.net
Nate Weaver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 19th, 2006, 07:38 PM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 505
Joe, Nate, thanks very much for the info. It seems like many many movies and shows employ this now. I was watching "Curb your Enthusiasm" last night, and it seems almost central to painting the image of authenticity and "fly-on-the-wall" style presentation. Another good reason for me to get a steadicam...
Greg Quinn is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Techniques for Independent Production

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:04 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network