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The TOTEM Poll: Totally Off Topic, Everything Media
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Old July 11th, 2005, 10:50 AM   #136
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bjorn Moren
Radek, in Sweden we have the US meaning of the word. Our "kameraman" means camera operator.
While "cameraman" does generally mean "camera operator" particular in the broadcast field, in classic Hollywood terms (which are still in use) the term "cameraman" specifically describes the Director of Photography, with "operating cameraman" and "assistant cameraman/men" applied to the operator and the AC's.
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Old July 11th, 2005, 01:15 PM   #137
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Went backwards

Wrote a thesis in communications. Started consulting. Started producing. Decided I wanted to direct. All of a sudden, twenty years later, found myself wanting to film. Now I've hired people 'above me' to do all the management and I go to the field and shoot.
I'm also a published photographer; light, composition and circumstance are a passion.
I'm also a vegan, if you're looking to hold something against me ;-).
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Old July 11th, 2005, 03:37 PM   #138
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i am just a dad, who started to videograhp the kids, about 5-6 years ago. no training just "do it" expirience. first thing i learned was, that a tri-pot is needed for almost everything. next thing i know i became the very best customer of b&h, several tausend dollars gone, and i still need much more. so more i tape, my portfolio gets better, more inquiries, but i lack some very basics about lighting, audio. since most of my shootings are in a theater/ studio setting. the step up from my sony trv 700 to canon xl1s was a expensive but great step.
my local college offers some classes, so i guess i will be a student again.

greetings
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Old July 11th, 2005, 10:40 PM   #139
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I started in television production as a camera assistant and pretty much learned the basics of camera etiquette through trial and error, observation, reading and experimentation. Eventually moved up to writer / producer / director / cameraman and began reading as much as I could: American Cinematographer, Videography, DV, ASC Video Manual, etc.

I tried at every junction to practise what I'd read, and bought a number of books to study: the Filmmaker's Handbook being one of my favorites. I also screened movies, television shows and tried to reproduce what I liked.

Then I got into editing and 2D compositing/finishing, played around with audio sweeting and tried to have a better understanding of how to control audio recording and reproduction. I also directed live (sometimes delayed or to tape) programming and multi-camera shoots.

This was over a period of 11 years and included many 100s of shoots and edits. I'd been exposed to video cameras, editing systems and formats galore: VHS to DigiBeta, Avid to Media100, and also 35mm film (commercials and a couple movies). Eventually I got to the point where I wanted to go to another level and decided to chuck my job and go back to school. I'm presently a Film Production student also studying Psychology (double major).

I think a college education can enhance what experience someone has accrued over the years, but there are many avenues to learning a craft. I've worked with many talented persons who had or didn't have a college education. Dedication, experimentation, the right attitude and a willingness to learn from others are what I've counted as the important ingredients for me.
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Old July 11th, 2005, 11:52 PM   #140
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For those who won't be going to Film School ...

Can those of you who have studied film (wether formal eduction or on your own) recommend your favorite books or DVDs for those interested in learning more? Thanks, Shawn
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Old July 12th, 2005, 12:50 AM   #141
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Learning Materials.

I think it depends on exactly what you want to learn or specialize in and of course how easily you can practise and master what you learn.

I'm very interested in all aspects of filmmaking (the choice of film or video is irrelevant) so I've done a lot of work on each area over time: not quite the best way to master one thing, but perhaps a good compromise to figure out what you really want to sink your teeth into.

I always read DV Magazine, Videography Magazine, American Cinematographer, POST Magazine and a couple others like Broadcast Engineer, Videomaker, and Fade In. Primarily to stay current and read about innovations, new technology, etc.

In terms of texts or Books I've read which have increased my knowledge of shooting and cinematography that I like: The Five C's of Cinematography, Every Frame a Rembrandt, Single Camera Video Production, The ASC Video Manual, The Filmmaker's Handbook, also Cinematography I've heard good things about (though honestly I haven't read just yet, but it is on my list).

Other books I've read pertain to writing, producing, directing, some include: Writing, Producing, Directing, the Screenwriter Within, Documentary Filmmaking, Story (still need to read this one as well), and a couple others I can't remember right now.

A couple off the wall books like Anatomy for the Artist and Digital Guerilla Filmmaking also helped fill some gaps.

Other things I've studied include training videos for Lightwave 3D, Soft Image 3D, Adobe Premiere, tutorials for After Effects, and lots of tutorials on compositing, blue screen lighting, etc. I also have a DVD Visions of Light which I would recommend.

This list may seem long, but it's really not. There are more things I could list, but if anyone wanted to have the authors I could email them off board. There are many books/materials produced by the AFI which are also great. Check them out.

Finally I've also worked with people who were experts in their field and I tried to learn what I could from them, and to bring myself as close to their level as possible - even if I could never match their ability I learned a lot. This approach helped me particularly with compositing and finishing, color correction, and generally tweaking images to look as you want them to.
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Old July 12th, 2005, 02:19 AM   #142
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete Wilie
I have been considering buying some of the more expensive DVD training that costs $100-$400 that cover subjects like directing, blocking, lighting, audio, etc. I think I could buy everything I need for $1,000 to $1,500. While this may sound high to some, it's a lot less than most film schools, and the DVDs could be sold when finished.

I wonder if any of you have used this approach for learning the filmmaking trade, and if so, what you think of it.
I bought the "HandsOn HVD" (www.handsonhdv.com) in order to take my filming to the next step. While I think this DVD is very professionally made, I expected it to cover more. I learned a few things though.

I like this approach, so if there would be more advanced material available I would buy it. I'm also seriously considering to niche my business to making educational videos. I'm doing one right now, and I really like the challenge of describing a subject in an understandable way to a viewer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cemil Giray
Wrote a thesis in communications. Started consulting. Started producing. Decided I wanted to direct. All of a sudden, twenty years later, found myself wanting to film. Now I've hired people 'above me' to do all the management and I go to the field and shoot.
I'm also a published photographer; light, composition and circumstance are a passion.
I'm also a vegan, if you're looking to hold something against me ;-).
How can I, when I used to have the living food/Ann Wigmore lifestyle? :-)

Interesting carrer. I've just started in this business, and when discussing projects with potential customers, I find that I will have to be scriptwriter, cameraman, sound, producer, editor and director all at the same time, since the limited budget doesn't cover extra people. It's very interesting but also puts some mental stress on me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Karl Heiner
next thing i know i became the very best customer of b&h, several tausend dollars gone, and i still need much more.
I thought $10.000 ought to cover what I wanted to do, but I'm not even close. There's always something I lack. I try to use cheap tricks, like poor man's steadicam. I also like cloud cast days, because then I can shoot outdoors, since I lack really good indoor lighting.
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 06:18 PM   #143
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Film School or Used Tools???

Hello people ;)

Should I go to Film school or just buy used Camera and accessories and learn as i go?

Currently Im in Uni studying Film Studies im still have 1 more year. I am studying Film Theory nothing relating to hands on work. As for the technical side of Film I know a good amount however I want to learn more as we all do.

I was looking at NYFA and LFS (london film school)

Since this forum is so diverse and I am sure someone has been to one of these film schools I would like to know your opinion. Of course attainding FIlm School would be extremely beneficial for me without a doubt. However in this world not all of us are financial independant.

Film tuition for 1 year at NYFA will cost me around 28 000$
Film tuition for 1 year at LFS will cost me around 30 000$

Or should I just buy a used XL2 and accessories - Pratice and make mistakes and learn?

Let me know please.
Thanks,
Joey :)
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 06:24 PM   #144
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You aren't going to get into any legit film schools unless you already can demonstrate some skills.

Go buy yourself a cheapish camera with manual control, some lights, a tripod and a good mic. Get some real world practice first. You can have all the theory you want, but unless you can apply it, you've got nothing.
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 06:30 PM   #145
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thats a pretty crazy one year film school fee.. use that $$ and buy yourself some gear.. or move here to canada and do film school for cheaper.. if you move to the province of quebec here in canada and become a resident by living there for 6 months you can do film school for extremely cheap in montreal. I have the same thoughts for myself right now.. but i graduated 4 years ago and have purchased a few cameras and upgraded a few times.. i have an xl1s with a 35mm adapter, lots of lenses and a light kit, i would definately like to do film school just to be able to direct more of my time and attention to filmmaking and make some good contacts.. but yeah .. most film school srequire that you demonstrate some skill.. usually they require you to submit a portfolio. buy up a camera.. do some shorts.. get some practice in and then see what you want to do. non reason to thro out all that cash only to realize that its not the move you should have made
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 11:37 PM   #146
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Hey Joey, I have learned much more off these boards and off real world experience than I have learned in film school. I suggest reading as many books as you possibly can, watch lots of films, visit these boards, and actually go out and make movies. Good Luck with whatever you choose.
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Old March 3rd, 2006, 12:10 AM   #147
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From what I've seen, film school doesn't significantly increase your chances of getting a job. A large portion of the people working in the film/video field don't have relevant degrees. Most of the people graduating with these degrees aren't getting relevant jobs. Most people I've talked to would tell you not to go to film school.

On the other hand, particular programs may be good... I've heard good things about Sheridan's advanced editing course (Sheridan College's Advanced TV & Film master editing class). The owner of PPD (ppd.ca) told me that he favours graduates from that program/course since they have a good base knowledge of Avid editing, so that way he has to provide less training to assistant editors. Sheridan graduates still need training in some basic technical things when they graduate though... so even that education is not as good as it could be.

2- Some film schools you can get into without having a film/video portfolio. The admissions is different between programs. It's not necessarily the most talented or experienced people who make it into these programs.

3- If you can get a paying entry-level job (i.e. assistant anything), take it over film school. At best, film school might help you land one of those entry-level jobs.
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Old March 3rd, 2006, 01:29 AM   #148
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Personally, I've rarely taken a formal course on almost anything that taught at a faster pace than I could teach myself (some exceptions, but not many). For me, self education is, on the whole, a much, much faster way to learn (and far less expensive). The advent of the internet has further exaggerated the difference. The key though, is learning, by whatever method works best for the individual.
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Old March 3rd, 2006, 02:31 AM   #149
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Dude find a community college that has state of the art equipment spend a whole lot less and find a job while going to community college. Ive had three different jobs throughout my semester at a Community College type of school and so far they have been great. Worked some post productions(all HD stuff), indie films(by students who needed some cheap help cuz all of their money went to paying for college needed an editor who could also lug equipment)......of course this has been what ive been doing, could end up different for other people. Basically what im trying to say is there are many options available and i have to agree now is the time to apply some of your thoery......get in on some low pay/deferred type of work.....to get that real world experience, then after a period of building your portfolio then consider a film school....or maybe by that time you'll be somewhat established, have enough work that you dont even need a film school. good luck....best advice any decision is a good one.....as long as you make one and go for it.
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Old March 3rd, 2006, 02:53 AM   #150
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Joey - The obvious question escaped me at first. Do you intend to go into film as a professional, or is a career in video just as attractive to you?
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