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Old July 5th, 2008, 09:43 PM   #1
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Tripod on vibrating floor

Could anyone suggest a tripod which would work to soften vibration off a floor ? When i film live bands i am often put in a position where the floor isnt very stable and loud music with loads of bass creates a problem.. The flloor can literally shake and it makes it especially difficult to do close zooms because the vibrationis really noticeable...

I have considered just using a heavy tripod designed for a larger camera, but im not sure that would relieve it totally ? Also its hard cause i cant justify spending more than say $700 or so on it.

Appreciate any suggestions.

EDIT: Just realised some other threads about this exist, Sorry for multiple posting.. Still hoping to find a solution
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Old July 5th, 2008, 10:16 PM   #2
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Could anyone suggest a tripod which would work to soften vibration off a floor ? When i film live bands i am often put in a position where the floor isnt very stable and loud music with loads of bass creates a problem...
What about placing the tripod on a platform that is isolated from the floor in some way? Though it's not "on label" use, you might look at Auralex products. I use the Gramma for my guitar speaker cabinet and it works well. So it might work for a tripod...another promising product looked like the Platfeet. These are used as sound isolation platforms for mic stands, floor toms or cymbals, platfeet absorb structural borne resonance before it reaches a microphone...so it might work for a tripod as well.

http://www.auralex.com/sound_isolati...n_xpanders.asp
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Old July 6th, 2008, 09:59 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy Sanchez View Post
Could anyone suggest a tripod which would work to soften vibration off a floor ? When i film live bands i am often put in a position where the floor isnt very stable and loud music with loads of bass creates a problem.. The flloor can literally shake and it makes it especially difficult to do close zooms because the vibrationis really noticeable...

I have considered just using a heavy tripod designed for a larger camera, but im not sure that would relieve it totally ? Also its hard cause i cant justify spending more than say $700 or so on it.

Appreciate any suggestions.

EDIT: Just realised some other threads about this exist, Sorry for multiple posting.. Still hoping to find a solution
The easiest solution that I always implement (and did this on Saturday) is to place some foam rubber about 1 - 2" thick under each tripod leg. I was in a crunch Saturday as I didn't bring any with me so someone volunteered to go to the store. They bought a memory foam pillow and brought to me... I cut it down to about 6" squares and then about 2" thick. This memory foam worked great!!! Long story, but we were relocated on the 2 side cameras to stage front (left and right) on the speaker platforms (not planned). Anyways, the foam cured the problem.
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Old July 6th, 2008, 01:18 PM   #4
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Try closed-cell foam (the kind used in camping mats and seats, that doesn't absorb water)- I've used it for stills work, but not tried it with a video camera. Made little "shoes" for the tripod, with several thicknesses on the "soles".
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Old July 6th, 2008, 01:35 PM   #5
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I've successfully used short lengths of foam pipe lagging (insulation) on the feet of microphone stands for occasions when there was enthusiastic (but unwanted) foot tapping at concerts. It might work well here too.
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Old July 6th, 2008, 03:08 PM   #6
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McMaster Carr sells all sorts of vibration isolation components - http://www.mcmaster.com/
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Old July 6th, 2008, 06:32 PM   #7
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Had that problem on location once, placed the sticks on sandbags.
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Old July 7th, 2008, 03:14 AM   #8
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I'll try some foam under the tripods feet and see how i go.. More people have that same suggestions elsewhere also.
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Old July 7th, 2008, 07:41 AM   #9
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High density foam should work just dandy. Much lighter than lugging around sandbags! I just pointed out that I used sandbags when this situation cropped up as an improvisational technique.
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