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Old June 14th, 2004, 05:04 PM   #1
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Tripod/Head Options for a Sony PD170

Hello to the group,

I'm new to the group and I have been looking at various tripod and head options for mounting a Sony PD170. What recommendations can you give for a high quality tripod and head that will offer very smooth action? The tripod will be used 99% of the time in a studio, if that matters. Comfortable price range is $1,200 or less for both, but can go higher if necessary. Thanks in advance and all the best to you and yours!

Steve Russell
The Woodlands, Texas
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Old June 14th, 2004, 07:59 PM   #2
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I personally use the Bogen 501. Very nice- mid priced. Can be used with my quick-release plate on my glidecam, and monopod. Very versitile.
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Old June 16th, 2004, 06:59 PM   #3
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I too will shortly be buying a tripod for my sony pd170. I see there are different stages, system and words like that, that mean nothing to me. A good fluid tripod, thats light and inexpensive is my goal. Looking forward to seeing what you're using.

tim
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Old June 17th, 2004, 03:56 AM   #4
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Yes, whether it is used in the studio or not DOES make a difference. A flat, even, floor is much different from an irregular surface outdoors. You can use a flat-mounted head in a studio, working outdoors you would probably prefer a leveling half-ball mount. Indoors you can use a floor spreader but outdoors you would want a mid-spreader. You have more choices indoors because they will all work there, not so outdoors.

It doesn't take long to find out what you like or don't like about a head or tripod. I have had four different heads in a month's time. I started with a Bogen 3130 (128rc) and immediately traded that for a Bogen 501. [BTW, I have a VX2100] I took the 501 back the next day and ordered a Miller DS5. It was defective so I returned it and decided to have them send me a Miller DS10 because the DS5 did not have tilt & pan locks.

Now I have the DS10 and I would be very happy except that it rebounds on pans. When I pan left and release the handle, the cam creeps back to the right a little (and vice-versa). No one else seems to have this problem but it occured with both the DS5 and DS10.

If I got anything else, it would be a Vinten Vision 3. Everyone says that these are better than the Miller. I hope so.

In the studio, it makes more sense, when given a choice, to get the heavier of two pods. Weight adds to stability. The ONLY reason to buy a light weight [e.g. 5 pound] pod is that it is easier to carry around. So, for someone on the move, a light pod is good, for studio work, look for something like, ten pounds.

STAGES refers to how many extensions are available on the legs. A single-stage tripod has one set of tubes that extend from the legs to make it taller. A two-stage tripod has two additional tubes to extend. Usually a two-stage will go higher. This is usually a good thing because it enables you to get a wide variety of height angles in your studio. But, someone who only does interviews with people probably does not need this additional height and weight added to the tripod.

Another thing to consider is how low the pod can go. Again, someone shooting interviews is not as concerned with this but someone doing product shots could be.
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Old June 17th, 2004, 08:50 AM   #5
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<<<-- Originally posted by Nick Reed : I returned it and decided to have them send me a Miller DS10 because the DS5 did not have tilt & pan locks. -->>>

This is incorrect, I have a DS-5 and it does have tilt and pan locks. What it lacks is a precision drag adjustment for the tilt and pan, maybe that's what you meant?
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Old June 17th, 2004, 02:14 PM   #6
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SHoulder support

i was goign to buy the M20 tripod, but most of the reviews seem to be negative. It seems from my research that you can't get a good set-up, with decent professional movement for less the $350. Making a documentry(with my own money) i need one for interviews, mainly. Hopefully i'll be able to borrow one from this Community station i know when the time comes.

Something that seems very usually are shoulder mounts. Has anyone had any luck with a shoulder support for these cameras? Or this there any type of stabilizer that work really well for this camera? I feel that i'm pulling to a new thread and maybe i should start a new one.
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Old June 17th, 2004, 07:44 PM   #7
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<<<-- Originally posted by Boyd Ostroff : <<<-- Originally posted by Nick Reed : I returned it and decided to have them send me a Miller DS10 because the DS5 did not have tilt & pan locks. -->>>

This is incorrect, I have a DS-5 and it does have tilt and pan locks. What it lacks is a precision drag adjustment for the tilt and pan, maybe that's what you meant? -->>>

Yes, Boyd, you are correct on both accounts. That is indeed what I meant. Thanks for the correction.
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Old June 28th, 2004, 05:41 PM   #8
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i use a VINTEN-5 with my PD-150. i like it a lot.
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Old June 29th, 2004, 10:24 PM   #9
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The M20 tripod does just fine as long as you don't have to pan it while shooting. It's pretty stable, quick to set up and easy to carry.

The locking knobs are a bit delicate and their shafts can be bent if you knock the tripod around.

I have two and use them a lot. But not when I have to pan. For that I use a Miller head.
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