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Under Water, Over Land
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Old April 12th, 2006, 06:06 PM   #1
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water running off the lense

Gday, my first post so easy on me!...
:)

I have a mate who has a under water housing for Sony VX1000 camera what do they use to keep the water sliding off the glass when you come out of the water, as you see in surfing shots!... He's done the usual detergent, spitting on the camera etc... is there a solution you can buy!...

Thanks

JS
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Old April 13th, 2006, 01:47 AM   #2
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Hi John,
Not a silly question at all. I had to do a lot of crane shots on a film a couple of years back that involved the camera (in a housing) mounted on a jib arm which would be craned down or up (depending) into rivers, the sea, tidal pools etc.

We had the same issues with water beading on the lens or running in very noticeable streams of the front port. There are a few things you can do. Unfortunately in our case (an probably yours) the wide angles (an thus the hyperfocal distances) you use underwater ensure that everthing is in focus, including beads of water on the lens. Our savior came in the form of a liquid called 'screen mate' or something like that. It is used by motorcyclists on their helmet visors and to put on windscreens. This does not remove the problem but it helps a lot. It is not very environmentally friendly but I think that filmmaking by default is not that 'clean'. Put it on the port, let it dry, polish it off again and give it a try.

Good luck,

James
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Old April 13th, 2006, 07:39 AM   #3
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Thanks James
There is a product here that you can put on windscreens, also anti fog sticks as well will pass this on, and of course will experiment with that thanks for the quick reply.

Regards

JS
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Old April 13th, 2006, 10:07 AM   #4
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In the US there is a product called Rain-X, used for car windshields. Works pretty well. There may be an Aussie equivalent.
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Old April 13th, 2006, 04:04 PM   #5
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Try using a piece of apple. The fruit part, not the skin! Also, remove the seeds because they will scratch your lens.

It only last a few minutes, but works very well.

If you are going to try and film surfers, this may not work for you since you will be in the water for longer than it will last.

If you are filming in and out fo the water, this is one of the best ways to keep the droplets off your lens. Just re-apply every few minutes.

Best,
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Old April 13th, 2006, 04:18 PM   #6
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Rain-X is what I've used with some success. It's made for automotive windshields.
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Old April 13th, 2006, 11:00 PM   #7
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I can vouch for Rain-X if you can get it in Oz. If not, then use natures own. Spit on the lens, rub it around and wash off. Then spit on it again and rub around but leave to dry. Buff off before getting in the water. This is a technique used by a lot of camera guys from Nat Geo. Used it last year with them in Mexico and South Africa for filming seal pups in the shallows. Whilst the action was fast we did set up some split screen shots and it worked fine.

Cheers,
Mark.
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Old April 14th, 2006, 12:50 AM   #8
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What's the saying Mark?... the greener the cleaner...
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Old April 18th, 2006, 10:03 AM   #9
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John,

Forget Rain-X, apples, oranges, peaches, pears or plums to solve your problem...

Saliva is by far the best method. First thing, dunk your housing in the water, the spit heaps on the port. Rub it in with your finger in a circular motion, then dunk it under water again. Spit again on th port, rub it in then dunk it under water again... Do this 4-5 times at least, until your lens port is nice & clear..

Then just before your about to roll tape, dunk it under water again and when you pull it up the lens port will almost certainly be clear & bead free! Its a method i've used for years now & has never failed me... the trick is to this method 4-5 times before you use like I mentioned...
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Old April 21st, 2006, 09:41 AM   #10
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John,
Try them all. And what works best, use it. Just go to your local pool and try them all out.

Some advice given takes 3 seconds to work, others seem to take 10 minutes of repeating the same process over and over. And as a Nature, Underwater or Outdoor videographer, you need to be ready for the shot and ready to go. Not fussing over how many times you need to buff and dunk a lens.

Just remember Spit and Apples are the same concept. But Apples have a higher and more consistent acidity level; which is what prevents beading and standing of water on the lens surface.

Second, you can use anything with a wax base that will not allow water to bead and stand on the surface of the lens. Go to your local motorcycle shop, they usually have this little wax stick for helmet visors. You just make an X on the lens and buff it in with a lens cloth. It should last for around 24 hrs.

I am sure Rain-X will work, but you will still get some standing beads of water. The package says you must be driving more than 35 mph for Rain-X to push the beads off the window.

I have used every one of these, and it boils down to your preference, and what works best for you and the situation you will be filming in.

Freshwater, Saltwater, hard current, no current or a chlorinated pool will all create different outcomes for each remedy.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 07:37 AM   #11
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No more beeds

Yep good old Spit.
Get it wet first then spit and rub, do it a few times and then keep doing it.
The more you do it the beter is gets.

Paul
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