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Old October 24th, 2006, 06:21 PM   #1
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Musk Ox - Part IV

Hi all!
Last weekend the scenery suddenly changed with falling snow. I got some lovely shots with the muskox in the white snow scenery.

I used Tony's XL2 Globetrotter 2006 Preset on these shots.
Click on the link to view a flash-movie:
http://www.video-film.no/snutter/muskox4.html

Mac-users: http://www.video-film.no/snutter/muskox4.mov (please download before viewing!)

Enjoy!
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Old October 25th, 2006, 02:27 AM   #2
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Per,

Part 4 is great, I love the establishing shots at the start, it was a pity they were lacking in the earlier segments. This is your best segment.

Have you thought about how you are going to edit all the segments together, will you be using graphics to link them?

Tony's globetrotter setting seem ideal.

Bob
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Old October 25th, 2006, 03:15 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Thompson
Per,

Part 4 is great, I love the establishing shots at the start, it was a pity they were lacking in the earlier segments. This is your best segment.

Have you thought about how you are going to edit all the segments together, will you be using graphics to link them?

Tony's globetrotter setting seem ideal.

Bob
Well, this short segments are just independent samples and not any part of the finished film. I'm putting them online just to make interest and hopefully this will give me some sponsors for the project!
I will stay regulary in the mountains for a year to come, collecting aprox. 50-60 hours of raw material, editing it to approx. 20 min finished film.
It will be a dirty job to throw things away which not will fit into the finished film. An adage says - Kill your darlings.
Fortunately I have some good and professional friends which I'm going to relay on in the editing stage.
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Old October 30th, 2006, 10:11 AM   #4
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Website updated!

I have updated my website with some nice stillpictures. I have made an english part, so you can read more about the Musk Oxen Project.

Some of you wondered how I carry my equipment, on the pictures you can take a look.

http://www.video-film.no/prosjekt_eng.html

More info, pictures and video coming soon...

Enjoy!
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Old October 30th, 2006, 12:34 PM   #5
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More power to you

Delightful footage once again Per Johan and the info including working photos on your revised website is more helpful. You're a great advertisement for XL2 + Sigma 300/f2.8.

In practice do you avoid panning and use only the "rock-steady" set-up and wait for the target to come into your pre-determind field of view? How easy/difficult is it panning with ronsrail? I realise that your magnification is very high and that you are editing your footage down to millimetres but I wonder what sort of image clarity would you have got if you had been panning smoothly within 50 metres of the bike-riders, using slightly lower magnification I presume? The background would have been blurred but what's wrong with that?

Questions about panning seem likely to interest me for ever and I will be pursuing many sources of info about it.
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Old October 30th, 2006, 12:37 PM   #6
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That looked great. What resolution was that ?
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Old October 30th, 2006, 04:19 PM   #7
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Brendan:
Thanks for your comments about my "new" website. Hopefully this will bring more interest to my Musk Ox Project and may be some sponsors to the project.

Regarding the panning, I think the tripod is a very important factor here. In some of the videoes you can see that I'm panning. I feel that I have some more practising to do before I can pan without any camerashake. And it is more easy to pan from a distance than close at the target, cause of the movement you have to do to follow the target. Also if you are closer you have to hunt for the focus than from a distance.

Joey,
I'm not sure what you mean about resolution. The still pictures are taken with a Canon 20D digital SLR, the resolution is 8.2 million pixels
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Old November 1st, 2006, 11:09 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Per Johan ... (on another thread)
... In the PAL world I try to use the 1/50 shutter (NTSC: 1/60) then try to bring the aperture between 5.6 and 11 (not any lower!) Compensate with ND- or polarization filters to maintain the aperture at this level.


Shooting outdoor and 100+ metres from moving target how and when would your Arctic footage be improved or disimproved if you used 1/500 shutter, Per Johan? Is it a basic fact (that I should have learned by now) that 1/50 gives you better colours than 1/500? What is lost using faster shutter speed?

Would Meryem have observations on this question too from red rock canyon country?
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Old November 1st, 2006, 12:05 PM   #9
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Colour should be the same at both shutter speeds if exposure is correct in both. The main difference would be perceived movement of the objects that are being filmed (smooth or jagged), especially during panning or observing a bird’s wing beats etc.
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Old November 1st, 2006, 01:12 PM   #10
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Tony,
So if my exposure is correct and the object is a bird in flight a faster shutter speed will make the action smoother than it would be with slower shutter speed?

That seems to confirm when testing today on swans strolling on shore I found that the odd wingflapping showed up jagged @ 1/50 and less so @1/500. When I switched from 1/500 to 1/50 the footage showed much too white, almost bleached out at first and then it improved quite a bit ... that's my XM2 (GL2). Could I adapt your acclaimed XL2 settings to some extent on XM2? Light at about 45 degrees should be bright here for a few days.
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