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Old February 23rd, 2009, 04:17 PM   #16
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other than the fact that I'm jealous that you got to shoot with a brand new camera in Africa, I loved it. Gorgeous and nice to see something besides Iowa on the other side of the camera...
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Old February 24th, 2009, 12:22 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Railsback View Post
Well, I was going to do a longer version of my film "The River" following life on the river for a year. During the Summer of '08 we had a 500 year flood.

But then I had a chance to go to South Africa to shake out Panasonic's new HPX-300.

Even though it was a whirlwind trip, I fell in love with the place and its people.


So, I hated to not be able to use any of that footage so I cobbled up a quick idea. It may go down in flames faster than the Hindenburg but hey it's a challenge right? :)

The Pangaea theory is one that states that all present continents were once together and collectively known as a 'supercontinent' called a Pangaea. The word 'Pangaea' means 'all lands' in Greek, accurately defining the way the continents were 200 millions years ago before it split up.

Over time the continents drifted apart on continental plates "floating" on top of the Earth's mantle. Some, like the African continent stayed around the equator where it experienced little change. Because of this, Africa enjoys an incredible diversity as flora and fauna have been given time to evolve and specialize.

North America on the other hand, drifted North ( duh ) toward the pole where it was shaped and reshaped.

Iowa for example was once covered by a shallow sea and then scarred by glaciers during the ice ages which scoured the land.

In geological terms, the face of Iowa is fairly new compared to an area like Africa.

This film will examine the changes that effected Iowa and prevented the diversity we see so much in Africa.

Or, it may not. Who knows. Like I said, I'm flying by the seat of my pants on this one. So, I'll probably be looking for a lot of help.


So here's some footage. I just set it to a temp track to make it a little easier to take.

http://www.silverphoenixllc.com/Africa2.mov
Kevin,

Very nice. If possible, can you please describe your workflow with the HPX-300? Did you shoot DVCPro HD or Intra AVC?

Thanks and nice work,

Daniel Weber
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Old February 25th, 2009, 07:12 PM   #18
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Kevin,

Very nice. If possible, can you please describe your workflow with the HPX-300? Did you shoot DVCPro HD or Intra AVC?

Thanks and nice work,

Daniel Weber
Never mind. I read Barry Green's article on another website that described your trip and the workflow that you used a little.

Daniel Weber
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Old February 26th, 2009, 08:47 AM   #19
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Superb footage Kevin! My only criticism is it looks a little too vibrant. Was that a decision made in post?
Very interesting idea about comparing the wildlife in both continents. I look forward to your discoveries!
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Old February 26th, 2009, 06:55 PM   #20
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Yeah, most film savvy people think it's too saturated while regular joes love the color. Go figure. :)

The almost artificial stuff isn't so much because of the saturation as it's over exposed.
I had the zebras down to 90 but it was still burning stuff out.

No CC that's how it came out of the camera. I guess I can dull it up in post and desaturate it. Maybe I should make it all B&W? :)
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Old March 8th, 2009, 07:05 PM   #21
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Kevin,


I personally love the richer colors. If its for the populace then the average joes should rule!!
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Old March 20th, 2009, 08:05 AM   #22
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You have a very interesting topic here Kevin. I can’t wait to see which way you go with it. A classic example of speciation often used in textbooks has been the effects of glaciation on the North American wood warbler family. They’ll be migrating through your area in the next few weeks.
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Old March 20th, 2009, 07:19 PM   #23
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Mike,
I'm not aware of the concept of glaciation affecting speciation in Wood Warblers, but would love to learn about it. Do you have any references.
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Old March 20th, 2009, 09:56 PM   #24
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Sure Steve,
As far as I recall, it was first mentioned here:
MacArthur, R. H. 1958. Ecology. 39, 599-619.
And formally stated here:
Mengel, R. M. 1964. Living Bird 3, 9-43.
Mengel, R. M. 1970. Univ. Kansas Dept. Geology Special Pub. 3,279-340.
There’s a general discussion here:
Mayr, E. 1970. Populations, Species, and Evolution. Belknap Press. 453pp.
as well as in several introductory biology texts.
Here is a recent internet discussion:
WarblerWatch: What’s an example of a “superspecies” in the wood-warbler family?

Several recent papers using mitochondrial DNA have confirmed the hypothesis, at least in part, while maintaining it occurred earlier than originally proposed.
There's also a similar hypothesis for Plethodon salamanders.
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Old March 21st, 2009, 07:30 AM   #25
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Ah yes,
Those mythical, localized salamanders with the intriguing names like Cheat Mountain.
Thanks for the references. This should be fun.
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Old May 30th, 2009, 08:36 AM   #26
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Am I the first to respond to your second entry about the STIR organization? It was very interesting and eye opening...he was very well spoken and interesting. I assume that you will inner-cut the interview footage with the African stuff and then various other locals to show global environmental impact issues and then how it affects Iowa specifically?

I was intrigued by the interview but I think the lighting on his face could have been a little brighter or robust his left sides to increase the shadow/light contrast a little better.

Looking forward to more…
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Old June 1st, 2009, 01:07 PM   #27
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Kevin:

Details! You are amazingly silent in your endeavors. STIR is eye-opening and I am hoping that your film of this will bring its agenda before the world. But I'd love to know how you are going to be weaving your work, from the Iowa river to Africa. I know, I should go back to your initial notes and comments, but I would have liked a bit more to go on in your entry!

Knowing you, this will masterfully weave film, subject and emotion into a stunning outcome but I'm looking for clues!

Your narrator executes very well in front of the camera, but why the sheets over the furniture? I am one to distain the usual flooded in light one sees in some indoor interviews, but a bit more soft light on his face would have helped a bit.

Looking forward to your next entry, when much more starts coming to light and we see the excellence that we are accustomed to in your work!

best,

Cat
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Old July 21st, 2009, 02:19 AM   #28
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Hi Kevin.
Well, most have been said I guess, so I'll just wait for your next contribution.
I'm anxious to see your next move :)

All the best.
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