UWOL#2 "ShootinFerFun" by Bruce Foreman - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

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Old March 25th, 2007, 10:58 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Hooey View Post
Thanks for your video lead "Transit" regarding grafitti, I appreciate it!

One other thing I wanted to mention about your video. I was very impressed with the sound quality when you were shooting. I thought something like that would overload most mics and sound like a square wave but it sounds very good. I liked how the camera seemed to shudder with every shot too...very cool.

James Hooey
Do a Google search on -transit and dvd- and you'll get a few hits. You may have more luck ordering than renting but it's worth it for a look at what one guy got out on the DVD market with a rented camcorder.

http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/1808643790/dvdinfo

On the sound quality while shooting: The first camcorder I had, a version of a Panasonic VHS shoulder mount, would literally shut down audio wise and take about half a second to recover after any percussive noise. Since then the Sony Digital8 and Sony HC21 I've used have responded well audio wise to shooting noise.

My current camcorder is a Panasonic PV GS500 and it is the first one I've had with manual control over most functions. One of the useful settings is being able to set an audio level and still have AGC for percussive sounds that exceed the set level but would otherwise distort. I have an external stereo mic I can set up on a stand or stand and boom but didn't use it for this video because I planned to use no other location audio except for the carbine sequence.

The "shuddering" effect is strongest when the bullet path was closest to the camera. Even with some distance from the muzzle to the camera (as when I advanced) the effect was most pronounced when the shot path was closest. As I mentioned to Kevin above, the .223 carbine round is a high velocity round
and I feel that is a factor in the camera response.
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Old March 25th, 2007, 11:12 PM   #17
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Bruce,

I'm no gun-nut, but I would have really enjoyed a slow-paced, tightly framed, well miked, 3-minute piece on just prepping, loading and shooting that gun.

Tough thing to do by yourself though.

Still a good job though. My son loved it... Couldn't believe it when I told him the gun was real, and that you were shooting live rounds. He was dissapointed though when I had to break it to him that we're not allowed them in Canada.
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Old March 25th, 2007, 11:53 PM   #18
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Bruce,

can't add anything critically, kind of reminded me of close courters assult training back in my Marine days!!

I chuckled when you were shooting with the camera to the front. I wouldn't be standing there, cameraman or not the footage would have looked the same!! I liked it. Don't ever do that with a 300 mag, or a 50 browning! I suspect the shock could rattle the camera for sure, eh?

How far back was the camera??
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Old March 26th, 2007, 12:46 AM   #19
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Bruce, you have an interesting video. And it is great to see when someone is doing something different than what we (the audience) expect.
So I liked what you did.

Maybe you could have made a little better story out of it, but all in all, a good video.
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Old March 26th, 2007, 12:49 AM   #20
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Very nice images, as usual, Bruceórich and pretty. This is the first time Iíve seen video with the camera in front of the shooter, which made it more interesting to me. Almost seemed a tad risky there, dude, but you know what youíre doing. :)

My son has an AR15 and Iíve taped him shooting, plus I've shot some video of a .50. Like your current camera, the XL1s doesnít have a problem with recording the audio, which always impresses me. One question: seems every time Iíve taped rifles thereís muzzle flash, so I was kind of surprised when I didnít see any on yours. Was it the angle?

One camera angle I really liked was that of the rebuilding site at Ft. Conch. At first glance it made me wonder what was going on with the architecture in the background, which looked very cool to me.

Back to the guns, Iíve been wanting to sign up for a tactical class but figure I should get more proficient with the basics first. Next time you guys have a match I wish youíd shoot a little video and post it for me. Iíve promised my friend/teacher that Iíll produce a video for them on this very thing one of these days, so Iíd like to see what you do.
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Old March 26th, 2007, 11:12 AM   #21
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Hi Bruce:

I also watched your video without having read the comments. First, I thought it was great technical work being able to remotely film yourself in this way and always being in the field of view and with close ups as well. Wow!

I also think this is the kind of film that is a springboard for discussion of interpretation and meaning... which is not a bad thing! I thought you were drawing a line between shooting in war versus shooting as a recreation...

The music choice also steered me to draw some of these conclusions.

Interesting piece!

Cat Russell
Spike Productions
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Old March 26th, 2007, 11:38 AM   #22
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Hello Bruce:

Like many or the others I watched then read your post...So needless to say I was lost for a bit. I liked the crispness of the video, but I think you should hire a better actor hahahaha. Just kidding bro.

It was interesting to me when one realize that when I'm out with my camera I have a .270 on my back. Wouldn't dare step out of the cabins without it.

I enjoyed your film.

Brian
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Old March 26th, 2007, 07:25 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Diewert View Post
Bruce,

I'm no gun-nut, but I would have really enjoyed a slow-paced, tightly framed, well miked, 3-minute piece on just prepping, loading and shooting that gun.

Tough thing to do by yourself though.
Actually, when I consider what you just said, I probably should have done just that. I make my own handgun training videos to hand out to my students, I just didn't consider doing that because it seemed too "instructional" and not recreational.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Diewert View Post

Still a good job though. My son loved it... Couldn't believe it when I told him the gun was real, and that you were shooting live rounds. He was dissapointed though when I had to break it to him that we're not allowed them in Canada.
Well you probably can't have "so called" assault rifles, but I believe you're still able to own less military looking hunting rifles.

Thanks for your comments, the interchange of comments is one of the fun things about these challenges. Feels like getting to know some good folks better all the time.

Bruce Foreman
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Old March 26th, 2007, 07:31 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dale Guthormsen View Post
Bruce,

can't add anything critically, kind of reminded me of close courters assult training back in my Marine days!!

I chuckled when you were shooting with the camera to the front. I wouldn't be standing there, cameraman or not the footage would have looked the same!! I liked it. Don't ever do that with a 300 mag, or a 50 browning! I suspect the shock could rattle the camera for sure, eh?

How far back was the camera??
300 mag or 50 Browning shock wave might be more than that camcorder could take!!!

Camcorder was about 10 feet away. Bullet path of closest shots came within 24" of the camcorder.
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Old March 26th, 2007, 07:32 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Trond Saetre View Post
Bruce, you have an interesting video. And it is great to see when someone is doing something different than what we (the audience) expect.
So I liked what you did.

Maybe you could have made a little better story out of it, but all in all, a good video.
I was definitely "floundering" for ideas and direction.
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Old March 26th, 2007, 07:56 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Lorinda Norton View Post
Very nice images, as usual, Bruceórich and pretty. This is the first time Iíve seen video with the camera in front of the shooter, which made it more interesting to me. Almost seemed a tad risky there, dude, but you know what youíre doing. :)
I've seen it done on "American Shooter", "Personal Defense TV", and "American Rifleman" on the outdoor channel. And they have the "Remote Camera" disclaimer when they do this. So I figured if they can get away with it, I can.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorinda Norton View Post
My son has an AR15 and Iíve taped him shooting, plus I've shot some video of a .50. Like your current camera, the XL1s doesnít have a problem with recording the audio, which always impresses me. One question: seems every time Iíve taped rifles thereís muzzle flash, so I was kind of surprised when I didnít see any on yours. Was it the angle?
Muzzle flash has more to do with lighting conditions and powder type and amount in the cartridge. It's unburned powder exiting the muzzle if you see it in fair daylight. At dusk and at night anything gives a lot of muzzle flash. But many commercial rounds use powders designed to reduce it as much as possible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorinda Norton View Post
One camera angle I really liked was that of the rebuilding site at Ft. Conch. At first glance it made me wonder what was going on with the architecture in the background, which looked very cool to me.
The structure I was photographing is the beginning of restoration of another officers quarters like the other ones next to it. The black troopers ("Buffalo Soldiers") lived in barracks on the other side of the square while their white officers lived in family quarters. What you see in the background is a school playground. Elmer Kelton's book "The Wolf And The Buffalo" brought Ft. Concho alive for me and I need to produce a documentary on the fort and it's history.

San Angelo got it's start as a street of saloons and bawdy houses across the Concho River from the fort. Originally the name was Saint Angela. City still has a law on the books prohibiting "galloping your horse across the bridge" over the Concho River.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorinda Norton View Post
Back to the guns, Iíve been wanting to sign up for a tactical class but figure I should get more proficient with the basics first. Next time you guys have a match I wish youíd shoot a little video and post it for me. Iíve promised my friend/teacher that Iíll produce a video for them on this very thing one of these days, so Iíd like to see what you do.
Send me an email with a mailing address. I'll send you the most recent version of the DVD I give my students. It's "rude 'n crude" (I'm about to start a total redo of it reflecting the latest things I've learned) and you have to bear in mind I ain't no young fast moving guy, but the things taught are mostly still valid and you will get some practice ideas.

And you will most likely get some real ideas of what you want to produce, just send me a copy of what you produce if you do it.
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Old March 26th, 2007, 08:10 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Catherine Russell View Post
Hi Bruce:


I also think this is the kind of film that is a springboard for discussion of interpretation and meaning... which is not a bad thing! I thought you were drawing a line between shooting in war versus shooting as a recreation...

The music choice also steered me to draw some of these conclusions.

Interesting piece!
Hi, Cat. It did that. It's been interesting to see the discussions here. Had I stuck to my original intent to include voice narration, the idea of 2 types of shooting recreation would have been crystal clear.

Some folks who have known me for a few decades as a portrait and wedding photographer are surprised to run into me out at our local club range, then they come to understand. I enjoy both as recreation.
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Old March 26th, 2007, 08:14 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Brian McKay View Post
Hello Bruce:

Like many or the others I watched then read your post...So needless to say I was lost for a bit. I liked the crispness of the video, but I think you should hire a better actor hahahaha. Just kidding bro.
I'm ready to fire him!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian McKay View Post
It was interesting to me when one realize that when I'm out with my camera I have a .270 on my back. Wouldn't dare step out of the cabins without it.

I enjoyed your film.

Brian
Big hungry white bears wouldn't have anything to do with that, would they?

Thanks, Brian. I enjoyed yours (enjoying short sleeve shirt weather here)
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Old March 31st, 2007, 02:34 PM   #29
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Bruce....I really liked your video. Like so many others I was lost when I first watched it. That is not really unusual in my case though. I think the link could have been better formed between the 2 styles of shooting if you had used the truck scene to show the camera being put away and then the gun coming out.....just an opinion.

Thanks

Randy
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