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Video Monitors and Media Players for field or studio use (all display technologies).


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Old July 12th, 2002, 05:47 PM   #1
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Studio MONITOR - what are people using?

After searching around these forums, and finding lots of interesting info, but NOT quite what I'm looking for, I decided to go this route.

I'm interested in anyone's recommedation for a 13" studio monitor of good quality. Output at present is exclusively of native DV compression quality, but I'm looking to buy something that will last a while. 16 X 9 display is a plus, although I realize it's much more costly.

What are people using? Where are good places to buy?

So far I've looked at 2 models:
JVC BM-H1310SU ($875 at http://www.ggvideo.com/jvc_bmh1310.htm) and the
Sony PVM-14M2U ($870 at B&H)

Both are somewhat more expensive than I originally had in mind, but most sub $700 equipment displays only 450 lines of horizontal res or less and isn't 16X9 switchable.

Thank you for your time!
-Macauley
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Old July 12th, 2002, 07:19 PM   #2
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Macauley:

I use the Sony you mentioned, and have no complaints. It is the industry standard!

I was originally sold the next model down with my editing system and chose to switch it out because it didn't have the underscan and blue gun only features which meant I couldn't calibrate it accurately in the way I am accustomed to.

It makes a great edit monitor as well as a location monitor.

Good luck with your choices!
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Old July 12th, 2002, 07:42 PM   #3
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I have a NEC 2000 with a 21" screen. I paid about $100 for it on ebay. It has all the features I could ever want, including a huge screen for my aging eyes.
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Old July 12th, 2002, 08:50 PM   #4
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Hi! You should check out my post in this thread here on these boards. The monitor I describe is nearly identical to one of the monitors you're looking at, but you'll be able to find it for $500+ cheaper.

http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/showthread.php?s=&threadid=1709&highlight=sony+monitor

It's not 16:9 switchable, though.
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Old July 13th, 2002, 12:43 AM   #5
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Macauley,

Why don't you go with a Sony wide screen tv. Do you really need a studio monitor when a good quality TV will do the job.

Ultimately a ref monitor is a great tool, but does the average user need one. Unless you are going into some serious broadcast material that requires NTSC colour safe video and the use of vectorscope color analysis it's overkill.

Even if you are using a ref monitor you should still have a comsumer TV to check the final output. It's no point checking your post work on a 500+ line monitor when it's going to be viewed on a 240 line tv.

The bottom line is a good quality TV will do the job for 80% of crew here.
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Old July 13th, 2002, 01:24 AM   #6
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I agree with Adrian that a high-quality consumer tv is probably the most useful monitor for most of our work. Ultimately, that's how most of our pieces will be viewed. I have a small 8" high-res Sony reference monitor on my desk which I feed out of my deck (which is fed by Firewire from the computer). But I also use a 36" Sony consumer tv (fed from the same deck) which is ultimately the final standard against which I adjust color. The tv has a much warmer cast than the monitor, which generally looks a bit blue/green despite careful calibration against SMPTE bars. (I still can't figure that one out but have learned to accept it.)
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Old July 13th, 2002, 02:02 AM   #7
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Ken:

Sounds like the color temperature of your TV is set warmer than the broadcast monitor. I'm sure there's a menu setting for that...?

I think the fact that all consumer TV's will display differently (we know what NTSC really spells out, right?) is a good reason to use a broadcast monitor that can be calibrated. If one judges and performs color correction off a consumer TV that has a color cast or automatic circuitry that may be actively adjusting contrast, clamping levels etc., you may get fooled and over-compensate in some area. The next TV you play it on may just magnify that issue. These days there is such a wide range of picture quality available out there, I figure that hewing to a broadcast standard is the best way to maximize my chances that the video will look decent.

But I am sensitive to the cost factor as mentioned. I guess it depends on how critically you tweak your output. Personally, I'm gaga over the color correction capability in FCP 3.0, but I tend to work more off the image than the scopes.
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Old July 13th, 2002, 07:01 AM   #8
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Boy, go figure, everyone has a different opinion on monitors. Well, looks like the one thing we all agree on is that Sony monitors are pretty much the standard by which all others are judged. At least for broadcast. I also use a Sony monitor for reference work. In the studio I use a Sony 13 inch HR Trinitron, 450 lines of resolution. I don't feel 800 lines is necessary for DV. I like the 13, 8 inch is getting too small for my old eyes. In the field I use a 8 inch, 13 is getting too heavy. Do you see a trend here? I use the Sony 8044, has PAL and other nice features for the field like, battery power, compact size and weight. I use Sony for both indoor and out, so the images will match.

Consumer monitors are the great equalizer and are fine depending on the work you do, or hope to. If you are doing work that might be broadcast or you hope too, use pro studio monitors. Get them calibrated and leave the controls alone afterwards. Maybe use a consumer TV for checking safe areas, titles etc.

If your work is not for broadcast, but distribution via tape, I would check for safe color, contrast, black level etc. with a consumer and studio monitor. Then make minor corrections based on both monitors. But, this is only if it will never be broadcast.

Jeff
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Old July 21st, 2002, 06:09 PM   #9
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<<<-- Originally posted by Ken Tanaka :
<SNIP>
The tv has a much warmer cast than the monitor, which generally looks a bit blue/green despite careful calibration against SMPTE bars. (I still can't figure that one out but have learned to accept it.)>>

The story I've heard is the sony broadcast series (BVW) of monitors DO NOT have this a green cast, but the lower end model such as my 14MU2 all have a green cast. If you want a perfect monitor, Sony wants you to spend 2 or 3 times more money for the BVW line. Hmmmph.
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Old July 21st, 2002, 08:14 PM   #10
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Hmm. Well I have Sony's PVM-8045 which is an 8"/450 line portable AC/DC monitor. I think it's about as good as it gets, certainly in this size.

Trying to get the color to look good on this monitor has become an idle-time hobby for me, rather like knitting. I'd miss it if it was gone but it is rather silly to think that I'm futzing with a gadget that's supposed to be my color reference. Rather like having to wake your butler to serve your breakfast.
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Old July 22nd, 2002, 10:52 AM   #11
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Maybe it's a problem with the monitor. Have you compared it to other Sony'? I've had my share of out of adjustment monitors in the past and they are very frustrating to say the least. Some days I felt like throwing them across the room. I use Dave Riddle for my pro monitors. He does more adjustments than the manufacture 1-800-544-3746 I don't know if he has a web site.

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Old July 22nd, 2002, 11:05 AM   #12
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I don't have another Sony reference monitor to use for comparison. I'll probably try to restore the factory settings and start again. "Dave Riddle" is a person, a retailer,...?
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Old July 22nd, 2002, 11:19 AM   #13
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He's in CA and runs a repair, design, custom mfg facility. I have bought some refurb items from him over the years http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/davidriddle/ . He's a great guy and welcomes questions. I wouldn't hesitiate to contact him and see what he says about your monitor.

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Old July 22nd, 2002, 11:26 AM   #14
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Charles:
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Old July 22nd, 2002, 11:32 AM   #15
 
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Take a look at this inexpensive JVC. I use it, exclusively and love what I get. 750 lines of rez. The only thing you don't get is RGB component input. But, you do get S-video and BNC composite inputs/outputs.


http://store.yahoo.com/tcclub/jvtmh1375su.html
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