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Old March 21st, 2005, 12:08 PM   #1
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monitor mount (tri-pot)

hello all,

saw a picture, lost the link <G>

it shows a tri-pot with a table mounted to it, which holds a 13" monitor.

anybody has such device or can help out with some info please?

thanks

greetings
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Old March 21st, 2005, 05:19 PM   #2
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1- Solid light stand, like a 20" or 40" C-Stand or decent Beefy Baby type light stand.
1- 2 1/2 " grip head
1- Baby nail on plate
1- Piece of 1/2", or 3/4" plywood big enough for your monitor
1 or 2- short ratchet straps

Put the monitor on the plywood and find the center point of balance. Mark it and screw, or nail the baby nail on plate to the plywood. Be sure that the 5/8" pin is at the center mark. You now have a platform for your monitor. You may want to put a lip on the back of the platform, maybe even the front too. This will prevent the monitor from sliding off by accident, if the ratchet straps aren't tight.

Secure the monitor to the platform with the ratchet straps. Usually folks clip the metal hooks to the 5/8" pin. Pass the strap through the handle

Mount the grip head to the light stand, then mount the wood platform and monitor in the grip head.

The grip head can be adjusted so that the monitor is tilting up or down, depending on what's comfortable.
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Old March 22nd, 2005, 09:20 PM   #3
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<<<-- Originally posted by Mark Sasahara : 1- Solid light stand, like a 20" or 40" C-Stand or decent Beefy Baby type light stand.
1- 2 1/2 " grip head
1- Baby nail on plate
1- Piece of 1/2", or 3/4" plywood big enough for your monitor
1 or 2- short ratchet straps

Put the monitor on the plywood and find the center point of balance. Mark it and screw, or nail the baby nail on plate to the plywood. Be sure that the 5/8" pin is at the center mark. You now have a platform for your monitor. You may want to put a lip on the back of the platform, maybe even the front too. This will prevent the monitor from sliding off by accident, if the ratchet straps aren't tight.

Secure the monitor to the platform with the ratchet straps. Usually folks clip the metal hooks to the 5/8" pin. Pass the strap through the handle

Mount the grip head to the light stand, then mount the wood platform and monitor in the grip head.

The grip head can be adjusted so that the monitor is tilting up or down, depending on what's comfortable. -->>>

hello mark,

thanks for your post.

since english is my secong language i have to ask a few things.
what is a grip head and a baby nail on plate?

thanks
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Old March 23rd, 2005, 12:38 AM   #4
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Hi Karl,

Guten tag! (I'm assuming you're German, you're probably Dutch :~) ).

Grip head
http://www.msegrip.com/mse.php?show=...ducts_ID=25058

Baby Nail on Plate
http://www.msegrip.com/mse.php?show=...ducts_ID=24101

Use drywall screws to mount the baby plate to the bottom of the plywood platform. Drywall screws are great, because you don't have to drill a hole, you just get an electric drill, or cordless drill and screw it in.

Let me know if you need further assistance. Sorry I don't have a photo.
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Old March 24th, 2005, 07:07 PM   #5
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<<<-- Originally posted by Mark Sasahara : Hi Karl,

Guten tag! (I'm assuming you're German, you're probably Dutch :~) ).

Grip head
http://www.msegrip.com/mse.php?show=...ducts_ID=25058

Baby Nail on Plate
http://www.msegrip.com/mse.php?show=...ducts_ID=24101

Use drywall screws to mount the baby plate to the bottom of the plywood platform. Drywall screws are great, because you don't have to drill a hole, you just get an electric drill, or cordless drill and screw it in.

Let me know if you need further assistance. Sorry I don't have a photo. -->>>

hello mark

http://www.saferseas.com/

found the link. look at the opening page bottom right, and you will see what i was talking about. isn't there a weight problem by having a fairly heavy monitor hanging on a tri pot, even i like that idea very much.

thanks for your links and help. now i have a picture what to do.


greetings

(german)
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Old March 24th, 2005, 10:29 PM   #6
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Hi Karl,

Oh, okay I see, you want to mount on the tripod. You could use a mafer clamp and a Right Angle snap-in pin and then mount your wooden platform on that.

Unless you have a very sturdy tripod, this may not be a good idea. Your tripod would have to be able to carry the weight of the camera, head and monitor. Plus the weight of the monitor is offset, so that can create problems with the tripod being off balance. Clamping onto the legs may cause damage and make it difficult to unfold and collapse the tripod.


I don't know of anyone who mounts the monitor on the tripod, just because it hinders being able to set up the tripod quickly and easily. Viewing is difficult in that low position. This would only work if you are operating from the rear and the monitor is acting as your viewfinder. But I would still want to have the monitor at my eye level, so I can operate and look at it.

The monitor would also be in the way, as pictured. Generally, I operate from the left side of the camera, since that's where the viewfinder is. There isn't a good place on the tripod to put the monitor, plus if you have to move the camera around, you have to lug the whole tripod, camera and monitor. The monitor could take a fall. Generally it would be an unwieldy pain.

Get a separate stand and be sure to put a 10 Kilo (20Lb) sandbag on the bottom to prevent it from tipping over. Hang it from the cross braces and be sure that it is not touching the ground. If it's touching the ground, then it's not "working". Use sandbags on all your lightstands. Sometimes it's helpful to have them to steady the tripod too. You just have to be sure that the tripod can handle the weight.

Be sure that the monitor is securely mounted and the sandbag is on the stand. Those steps will help prevent disaster.
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Old March 26th, 2005, 03:22 PM   #7
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<<<-- Originally posted by Mark Sasahara : Hi Karl,

Oh, okay I see, you want to mount on the tripod. You could use a mafer clamp and a Right Angle snap-in pin and then mount your wooden platform on that.

Unless you have a very sturdy tripod, this may not be a good idea. Your tripod would have to be able to carry the weight of the camera, head and monitor. Plus the weight of the monitor is offset, so that can create problems with the tripod being off balance. Clamping onto the legs may cause damage and make it difficult to unfold and collapse the tripod.


I don't know of anyone who mounts the monitor on the tripod, just because it hinders being able to set up the tripod quickly and easily. Viewing is difficult in that low position. This would only work if you are operating from the rear and the monitor is acting as your viewfinder. But I would still want to have the monitor at my eye level, so I can operate and look at it.

The monitor would also be in the way, as pictured. Generally, I operate from the left side of the camera, since that's where the viewfinder is. There isn't a good place on the tripod to put the monitor, plus if you have to move the camera around, you have to lug the whole tripod, camera and monitor. The monitor could take a fall. Generally it would be an unwieldy pain.

Get a separate stand and be sure to put a 10 Kilo (20Lb) sandbag on the bottom to prevent it from tipping over. Hang it from the cross braces and be sure that it is not touching the ground. If it's touching the ground, then it's not "working". Use sandbags on all your lightstands. Sometimes it's helpful to have them to steady the tripod too. You just have to be sure that the tripod can handle the weight.

Be sure that the monitor is securely mounted and the sandbag is on the stand. Those steps will help prevent disaster. -->>>

hello mark,

i guess i take your advice for an extra monitor stand/ table, even i think i have a sturdy tri-pot, i don't "roll' around with my set up. most, if not all of my shootings are in a theater setting/ stationary anyway.
it's just more equippment to care arouns, and i am only a one man team. <G>

your links are very helpfull.

thanks

karl
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Old March 26th, 2005, 10:55 PM   #8
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Hi Karl,

It's more weight, but I think you will find it easier to use. I suggest you look into getting a good cart that folds. That way you can carry your equipment around without killing yourself.

Here are some other options:

The Porta Brace field monitor cases can be angled up so you can put it on the ground, or a table and still be able to see it.
http://www.portabrace.com/asp/ProdDesc.asp?DescCode=MF

Are you supporting a professional field monitor? If you are just looking for a larger viewfinder, you could try a 6 inch or 7 inch LCD monitor that you can mount on top of your camera. Do a search on this website for "Lilliput", "Panasonic 7 inch", "Nebtek", "LCD monitor". Others, like Astro and Varizoom make similar LCD monitors. Look around and try other searches too.

I recommend a professional monitor so that you can see accurately what you are doing with regard to color and framing. The best set up would eb to have both types of monitors, but that may be overdoing it.

Tell me a little bit more about how you work and what you want to use the monitor for. I just want to be sure that I'm giving you proper advice. Where are you usually shooting from in the theater?
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