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Old January 25th, 2010, 03:07 PM   #1
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DVI to RGB adaptor - will it work?

The setup I'm trying to make work is an interim thing until the funds are available for what I really need. So sticking to the purchase of a simple cable or another comparably sized monitor is what I need to stick to.

I'm using a MBP and recently purchased a Samsung 2333 HD TV/PC Monitor.

23" wide screen LCD monitor 2333HD - LCD Monitor - Monitor | SAMSUNG

Not the best thing going, but thought it might more or less serve my needs temporarily. Going DVI to DVI sends the signal no problem but for the fact that using the DVI input on the Samsung offers limited calibration possibilities. Greater calibration options exist using the RGB input, but nothing I've done, either in System Preferences nor on the Samsung will get the monitor to recognize that there is signal being sent to it. My Mac seems to detect the monitor as a VGA, although I do wonder if it just does this as it knows there is a DVI cable plugged into it. System preferences recognizes this "VGA" monitor as having a resolution of 800 x 600 which of course is wrong.

Does anyone know if this adapter can work in this setup or would I have better luck with a DVI to HDMI adapter. Blowing the budget on a Matrox Mini is not an option as my MBP is a 2.33 and not supported.

Thanks
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Old January 25th, 2010, 05:09 PM   #2
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Hi Jase.........

MBP = Mac Book Pro, right?

The DVI o/p from the MBP is a single channel digital stream of data.

The RGB i/p of the screen is looking for a three channel analogue signal.

Unless you have some type of active (as in inteligent) box to convert the DVI stream into three analogue signals of the correct type, you ain't going anywhere.

HDMI is the same digital stream of data as DVI, with the addition of multiplexed sound and the HDCP handshaking protocol.

It still won't give you RGB (highly unlikely that is IS RGB BTW, went out with the dinosaurs, most likely YPbPr Component, but we won't quibble) without an inteligent box to sort the signal.

Do a Google on "DVI to Component converter" and see what you scare out of the undergrowth.


CS
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Old January 25th, 2010, 05:48 PM   #3
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Chris
Thank you. Yes, MBP =Mac Book Pro. And I am using RGB interchangeably with component. Good to have that pointed out. Okay off to buy another cable. When I finally stop driving myself nuts with all this video schmideo stuff, I'm going into the copper recycling business!
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Old January 25th, 2010, 06:50 PM   #4
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Not to correct Chris but to ADD to this discussion - the DVI interface is an interesting one and CAN carry analog component as well as a strictly digital signal as well, DEPENDING on which implementation of the connector (and the signal generator ahead of it) the manufacturer is using. I have NO idea what Apple uses.

DVI comes in SEVERAL flavours, one of which IS an analog signal, one of which passes analog as well as digital... A little research turns up just how versatile this connector really can be. The easiest way to tell what CONNECTOR you have is how the pins in the two banks are arranged AND how the four INDEPENDENT pins alongside the "bar" are implemented.

And RGB is a FLAVOUR of component, USUALLY reserved for computer applications, although some digital video formats intended for animation over the years have used RGB component (D2 and D3 for example, which have had some install in South America). Our "usual" component is YUV/YPbPr or "colour difference component", such as the Betacam implementation in analog.
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Old January 25th, 2010, 09:22 PM   #5
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Thanks Shaun............

I was trying to keep things simple.

The only DVI o/p device I've ever come across that uses the analogue pins (and boy, do they use the analogue pins) is the Matrox graphic controller cards, specifically the Parhelia range, but there may well be others.

As with the Matrox, I would guess any device offering multiple o/p formats on the one connector would come with a pretty fiendish array of cable adapters allowing you to actually get at your selected signal, tho' given Apples business model, they could well be (expensive) optional extras.

Never heard of them tho'.

The last RGB i/p I know of on consumer gear is on my UK purchased, 10 year old Panny 29 incher (still going strong!).

Much to my astonishment (and good fortune) the Freeview satellite receiver box I installed last year to feed it had switchable RGB/ YPbPr o/p, whew. Never seen that on another piece of consumer gear here or the UK.

Back to the chase, have we got you sorted Jase?


CS
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Old January 26th, 2010, 02:57 AM   #6
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My MBP carries both digital and analog. Given how frequently Apple seems to change specs on the MBP lately, I won't say anything about other models. Looking again at the Samsung it does specifically say RGB. I had always thought that RGB and component were one and the same, so good to get clarity on that.

I've since gone out and picked up a DVI to HDMI adapter. So the ability to calibrate the monitor has substantially increased. Have yet to actually sit down and do that yet. Not expecting perfection but hoping for something reasonable. Returning it is always an option.

Thanks a lot guys.
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