Panasonic BT-H1390Y NTSC monitor - opinions? at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > The View: Video Display Hardware and Software

The View: Video Display Hardware and Software
Video Monitors and Media Players for field or studio use (all display technologies).


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old November 7th, 2002, 03:09 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Wilkes-Barre PA
Posts: 34
Panasonic BT-H1390Y NTSC monitor - opinions?

http://www.panasonic.com/PBDS/subcat...bt-h1390y.html

Is anyone familiar with this or similar Pana monitors?

The street price on these is around $1k, but a couple of vendors have re-certified, warrantied demos for about $800.

This is at least $200 beyond what I had intended to spend, but the difference (on paper at least) between this and what I can get for around $500 is huge.

Any warnings or endorsments?

Thank you.

lyd
Dave Grey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 7th, 2002, 03:54 PM   #2
Warden
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Clearwater, FL
Posts: 8,267
What will you be using it for? What type of projects do you do? If it is just for you it will be a great monitor. If you'll be using it to show work to clients then get a Sony. Most people prefer the phosphers (colors) that Sony monitors produce. I used to use Panasonics a lot, but clients could see the difference and I got tired of explaining it to clients.

Jeff
Jeff Donald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2002, 08:07 AM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Wilkes-Barre PA
Posts: 34
It is definately only for my use at this time. I have no clients, and no immediate goals of seeking them out.
This is something that may or may not ever happen.

Maybe I should sum up where I am here... I really enjoy working with video. I have extremely limited experience doing so. Along comes some discretionary income, so I am putting together a reasonable prosumer setup and intend to have a great time with it. After I become very solid in the tools, technology, and craft, I imagine that I would also enjoy using this equipment to generate some revenue. The first 90% of the battle is won, in that I love the work.

If, however, that does not happen due to the market for such work in my area, limitations on my time because of other work, or (heaven forbid!) hitting some wall in developing my capabilities, I have been carefull to keep my spending to a point where I do not *have* to get a return on investment in order to rationalize the whole affair.

That said, if were to get a Sony within the aforementioned sane budget, it would need to be either PVM-14N5U at about $500, or PVM14N6U at a little over $600, the primary difference between the two seeming to be 16:9 switchability and additional inputs on the pricier model.

Do any of these three models make more sense than the others given that info? I will say that if don't get the Panasonic now (to take advantage of the price) I will probably be waiting quite a while to get anything.

It disturbs me on some anal level, though, that I don't have any accurate way to proof my work. The best TV I own right now seems to have some issues. Looking at the SMPTE bars I can not distinguish the lighter area of the PLUGE even with the brightness maxed out. The red push makes me desaturate the color significantly in order to get decent flesh tones. That leaves me with either the VGA monitor or the camera LCD as the most accurate displays...

Anyway, sorry to digress. You see where I am coming from, and I thank you (and all on the forum) for the excellent advice so far. What are your thoughts here?

lyd
Dave Grey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2002, 08:31 AM   #4
Warden
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Clearwater, FL
Posts: 8,267
Go with the $600 dollar with 16:9 You may not need it right away but when you do you won't have to buy another monitor.

Jeff
Jeff Donald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2002, 10:24 AM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Las Cruces, NM
Posts: 343
Checking both Sony monitors on B&H website reveals that both models display only 4:3 aspect ratio. It seems the only difference, according to the description provided, is RGB input on the PVM14N6U. They list a used N6U for $429.
__________________
Ed Frazier
Ed Frazier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2002, 12:29 PM   #6
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Wilkes-Barre PA
Posts: 34
Hmmm...

Thanks for the heads up on the used unit... that might be a good deal for me. As far as the specs go, several
http://www.promax.com/Products/Detail/6108
other
http://www.dvwonline.com/products/sony/pvm14n6u.html
sites
http://shop.store.yahoo.com/sony-vid...14n6u14tr.html
describe it as being switchable.

I also found this http://bssc.sel.sony.com/Professiona.../pvm-14n6u.pdf document from Sony. I had trouble finding tech details on the Sony site, but this seems to confirm it. It looks like B&H just goofed.

lyd
Dave Grey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2002, 03:50 PM   #7
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Wilkes-Barre PA
Posts: 34
Regarding phosphors...

In hindsight, this question seemed better asked in a new thread on the topic...

http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/showthrea...&threadid=4842

Sorry for the clutter.

lyd
Dave Grey is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > The View: Video Display Hardware and Software

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:26 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network