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Video Monitors and Media Players for field or studio use (all display technologies).


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Old August 6th, 2010, 12:05 AM   #1
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VERY LARGE Display questions

Hi, all,
got an inquiry about prepping a retrospective video for a huge gala (200 guests). I've been told the screen to be used to display the production is 18' X 24'. (Yes, that's feet...not inches. Is that a Jumbotron)?

I've never worked with something that large, and am uncertain that a DVD or even BD would display well.

I'm worried that such a project on such a huge display screen may be a bit over my head. I use Adobe Production Studio Premium for editing.
What should I be concerned about with such a large display?
Are my concerns well-founded, or imagined?

All input would be appreciated.

Thanks.
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Old August 6th, 2010, 02:02 AM   #2
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What I CAN offer, having worked on four different "Jumbotron" systems (2 Sony Jumbotrons and 2 Daktronics) is that IF YOU ARE using a "Jumbotron" system, video levels CAN cause the boards to "freak out". Keep your whites at or below 100IRE. I've seen the boards "scream" and flicker at 110IRE.

It may well be you are using a single or multiprojector. In which case, expect that the gamma curve is going to be different than a monitor and you are likely to lose some shadow and highlight detail. Again, watch your highlights. Some projectors will auto correct footage that goes over 100IRE and this may end up causing the overall image to suffer greatly.

Interlaced footage may look significantly worse than progressive footage, depending on the system.

Hope this helps.
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Old August 6th, 2010, 11:40 AM   #3
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With that size, the viewing distance is go to be such that the image will probably look OK. Sort of like a billboard: standing right on top of it you will see all the "dots" that make up the image, but from a highway or a hundred or more feet away looks fine.

Now this all depends on the technical aspect which Shaun points out. Not sure if there is any special "optimal prep" for showing something on those two systems.

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Old August 6th, 2010, 08:44 PM   #4
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Forewarned is forearmed.

Thanks so much Shaun and Jonathan.

I'm still waiting to learn more about this display system. My impulsive hunch is to suspect it is one of those "multi-monitor" systems, with multiple screens performing as one. (Is there a name for those)?
I can't imagine a single screen that large without it being a projection unit. I also find it interesting that at that size (24' X 18') it still works out to a 4:3 aspect ratio. I would have expected it to be 16:9 to accommodate HD.

If I hear/learn more about this, I'll let you know how it turns out.

Thanks again.
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Old August 7th, 2010, 08:48 AM   #5
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I worked on a project at this years Glastonbury where we had two large screens, a similar size to what your describing.

These screens were some of the top end ones according to our organised and higher quality that what was being used on the main stages.

That said they where only SD 16:9 and my role was to produce daily news bulletins for them. The quality looked great on the screens even from relativity close up. They worked surprisingly well in mid day sun as well, far better than the stage screens.

These screens were very expensive daily costs so I would be surprised if many would pay the extra for HD.

Either SD or HD will look fine, if they are using a screen that large, people shouldn't be getting too close, otherwise a smaller screen should be used.

Jon
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Old August 7th, 2010, 11:07 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Denis Danatzko View Post
I also find it interesting that at that size (24' X 18') it still works out to a 4:3 aspect ratio. I would have expected it to be 16:9 to accommodate HD.
With big displays, viewing distance is king. If the people looking at it are far enough away, a razor sharp blu-ray can look razor sharp at any size. Typically minimum distance is the diagonal of the display. In this case, you want them at least 30 feet from the screen, preferably more like 45 feet.

I would also point out that just because the screen is 4:3, doesn't mean you have to to use it that way. IMHO, go 16:9 at least if you can. Wider tends to look better as screens get larger.

Try to find out what the equipment is and talk to the rental house or manufacturer to find out what the specs are for the incoming signal. Since the aspect ratio is 4:3, it's probably an older technology so a blu-ray optimized for modern displays might display poorly (as in crushed blacks, blown highlights, scarily vivid colors, etc.). If you find out ahead of time you can perhaps correct for some of it.

And most valuable would be to get on the system a day ahead for some tweak time. Seeing is believing, and seeing the system in action while you've still got a chance to tweak a bit might make all the difference.
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