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Video Monitors and Media Players for field or studio use (all display technologies).


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Old August 23rd, 2006, 01:51 AM   #1
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NTSC monitors

hello,
i need some advice on an affordable ntsc monitor to buy. I know nothing about them..anyone please help.
maybe even point me in the direction to buy one.
i use final cut pro
and shoot with a panasonic dvx100a.
thanks
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Old August 25th, 2006, 11:09 AM   #2
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Ryan,

Here's something to think about. Times are changing! All the new displays are HD, 16:9, and progressive scanning. If you're not already doing HD, you will be soon. An interlaced NTSC monitor just will not cut it. I'd hate to spend much money on something to soon be obsolete.
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Old August 31st, 2006, 09:18 AM   #3
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You can buy broadcast monitors from dvinfo.net sponsors like B&H and I think zotz and EVS would have them too. I recommend you check the B&H website first.... their prices are generally consistently good and their website is somewhat helpful.
bhphotovideo.com

In this ~$500-600 range, there should be some field CRT monitors that would be appropriate.

2- HD is coming eventually but for now I think it would make more sense to get a SD monitor.
-Your camera only does SD.
-The majority of your work will likely be distributed SD. HD DVDs aren't that practical currently (especially when it's not clear which format will be superior).
-The HD monitors currently aren't that great in terms of price/performance... I would hold off on buying one.
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Old September 19th, 2006, 01:30 PM   #4
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Used NTSC monitor

I am in the market for a used monitor with blue scan as a required feature. Ebay has plenty of monitors and I wanted to know if monitors have clocked hours recorded in memory like our cameras.
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Old September 19th, 2006, 08:06 PM   #5
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The problem with used monitors is that they might have subtle defects... convergence, focus, screen burns, etc. The other thing is that the phosphors change as electrons hit them... so they won't go as bright and their color response will change.
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Old September 20th, 2006, 02:10 AM   #6
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I second Glenn - you can find great deals on used monitors...for a reason. Truth be told, all CRT monitors lose a slight amount of calibration every time you move them. Better monitors are built to resist it more, but it's a fact of using magnetism to steer your picture. One thing to note is that all monitors, LCD or tube, die slowly. Those monitor calibrators people use for desktop computers actually tell the software what the monitor is capable of providing, updating as the phosphors or crystals age. If you need the monitor to be accurate, buy new.

If you're using the monitor in the field, make sure to get something that you can focus to, but isn't too small. Most "field" crt's are about 8-9". JVC makes a 4.5 that's very small but has more resolution than most 9" crt's. It's lccs, meaning b&w tube (very sharp) with lcd shutters in front of color filters. I personally have good eyes, so I don't mind the small picture - it's sharp to focus and accurate with colors. If you need more than 1 person to view the monitor, try a 9".

Also note that with LCD's, very few models out there below 10" can display TRUE sd video. Many will claim extreme resolutions, but you need to spend at least $700 to get one that can actually support 480! If you're pinching pennies, get a tube. And, if you're just using the monitor for focus checking and framing, you could get away with a b&w monitor - they generally have FAR higher resolution than color monitors and are a lot cheaper. Just make sure you're in the ballpark on your LCD as far as color goes. As a side note - 99.9% of shoulder-mount cameras (1/2" and 2/3") use b&w finders - much sharper than color! Obviously, you can't check to confirm that the lights aren't mixing temps too badly, but your focus is much more likely to be accurate.
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Old September 25th, 2006, 05:51 AM   #7
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Used NTSC monitor

Thanks Glenn and Jaron...

It would appear that purchasing a new CRT monitor would be the best decision. Preferably (9 inch) one that can be used in the field as well as in the studio. I don't have much experience working with a professional monitor. Up to this point I've used a toshiba 14' TV connected via S-video cable for studio color correction. The videos so far have been reasonable good for accurate color. That is to say nothing looked odd or out of color context, but I would like to be more accurate for the variety of displays in which my video may be viewed.

Again, thanks for the info...
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Old September 26th, 2006, 11:20 PM   #8
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Bill, if you are still reading this thread... A good crt is a good thing. So is knowing how to adjust them. There are a number of online resources, books, etc. on how to use color bars, especially split-field bars, to adjust your monitor. Learning what to use bars for will make an big difference.

Also, remember what your final output is going to be. Fine lined grafx that look ok on a computer monitor may look awful on an ntsc monitor, but if your video is going straight to the web anyway...

Anyway, learning how to properly adjust your monitor will make the money you spent on the thing worth it.
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Old October 2nd, 2006, 06:19 AM   #9
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NTSC monitor

Thanks Eric...I've found several online resources on adjusting monitors.
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