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Old October 12th, 2006, 02:31 PM   #1
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24 inch Dell as field monitor

See this thread:

http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/showthread.php?t=77344

I'm considering this workflow as well. Does anyone now if it's technically possible to power the Dell with one or to Sony V mount batteries? If so, this would be an ideal location monitor with good pixel for pixel quality, if all mounted in a nice flightcase.
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Old October 15th, 2006, 01:54 AM   #2
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I think the Dell has too many problems. Look into the BenQ FP241W or the upcoming BenQ FP241W Z monitors, which does seemingly everything better than the Dell.
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Old October 15th, 2006, 01:32 PM   #3
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Problems? Tell me then, I see people all over this forum and others recommending the 24" Dell.

Anyone got an idea about my solution? I know that IDX makes v-mount adapters with on the other side just 2 wires providing the 'raw' power. So basicly the only thing needed is a converter or so (not really into power etc.).
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Old October 15th, 2006, 06:08 PM   #4
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Dell
-vertical color banding (might have been fixed by A03 revision, but how can you guarantee that'll be the revision you'll get? some still claim A03 didn't fix the problem)
-twinkling effect when watching movies
-low res component
-doesn't support 1080i well
-I hear it only supports up to 720p and that it sometimes doesn't work when it tries to do 1080p despite the 1920x1200 res (research more to find out exactly what that is)
-backlight is not uniform at all
-S-PVA panel
-no HDMI
-no BFI/MPA technology yet (new Z version for BenQ will have BFI)
-lower gamut than other monitors like the Samsung Syncmaster 244T
-not so good color accuracy even after calibration (though pretty much all LCDs stumble with this)

In my opinion, the BenQ > Samsung > Dell for these 24" models. Of course, the Dell's price is unbeatable, but you get what you pay for I guess.

More info about the BenQ can be found here: http://www.hardforum.com/showthread....2&page=1&pp=20 (main problem seems to be lack of 1:1 pixel mapping)

More info about the Dell can be found here:
http://forums.us.dell.com/supportfor...monitor&page=1
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Old October 15th, 2006, 06:22 PM   #5
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The Dell is an EXCELLENT computer monitor but not a video monitor. People assume they can use cheaper computer monitors to monitor video but it generally is not a good idea and will not yield good results. Many people use the car-puter LCDs which are cheap but IMHO look like crap...



ash =o)
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Old October 15th, 2006, 06:23 PM   #6
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Okay, in my initial post I'm mentioning the Dell, but basically this can be any screen that can handle at least 1080 HD. The lack of connectors or not functioning component doesn't bother me really, since I'm planning to use the Blackmagic HD-SDI to DVI converter. So Color adjustment or so, is less important either, considering the fact that Te Blackmagic box does take care of that as well. I'm a fan of Apple's displays but not of their prices. Since the all stands at the IBC where using Apple Display's for HD viewing and Dell's are considered as the low cost equivalent (same factory according to some) for them, I thought they where good for it.
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Old October 15th, 2006, 06:27 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ash Greyson
The Dell is an EXCELLENT computer monitor but not a video monitor. People assume they can use cheaper computer monitors to monitor video but it generally is not a good idea and will not yield good results. Many people use the car-puter LCDs which are cheap but IMHO look like crap...
Your arguments are based on SD video I think. But what I want is Pixel for Pixel HD SDI preview on set. What I've heard and read around the internet, A LCD combined with Blackmagic or Aja HD-SDI to DVI converter is a killer. According to some people sometimes even better than good ol' CRT since those 'oldies' do not show you every pixel. one of the downsides is the black level.
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Old October 17th, 2006, 10:52 AM   #8
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Quite a few people use the Apple 23" for HD work, basically because it is pixel for pixel. Although given the choice, I personally still prefer a large CRT.
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Old October 17th, 2006, 05:31 PM   #9
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I do prefer CRT as well. But for the price of a 20+ CRT I can get 30 LCD solutions. But is the difference 30 times better? No. And again, according to some, CRT is not pixel for pixel...

But back to my initial question, Any thoughts about powering my dream preview setup...?
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Old October 18th, 2006, 02:43 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Drysdale
I personally still prefer a large CRT.

Large CRT as field monitor?!?!
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Old October 18th, 2006, 02:47 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincent Rozenberg
But back to my initial question, Any thoughts about powering my dream preview setup...?
What technology are those V batteries? If they are Li Ion they might not stand the current demand.

For powering a large monitor device you will need an inverter, to convert DC into AC. So you will probably need large batteries to feed it. By large I mean more than 10A.

Try to find some large equipment rental company and pose as someone who's willing to rent a monitor like the one you want. If they have one, ask them how they will power it. They may not give you much information but will point you in the right direction.
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Old October 18th, 2006, 03:49 PM   #12
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First, I'm not into 'power', voltage, amperage etc.

But on the spec page of Apple's cinema display I found that a 23 inch would need 90 watt at peak. Since a IDX E10 battery will give you 96.6 W per hour, I would say, it's gonna work. Or am I missing something big here?
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Old October 18th, 2006, 04:04 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincent Rozenberg
First, I'm not into 'power', voltage, amperage etc.
If you want to do what you propose, you should be into it ;)

Quote:
But on the spec page of Apple's cinema display I found that a 23 inch would need 90 watt at peak. Since a IDX E10 battery will give you 96.6 W per hour, I would say, it's gonna work. Or am I missing something big here?
That's for AC watts, which can be for 110v or 220v, but should be around .8A.

The other is for DC watts, which for 12v should be around 9A. To take those 12VDC up to 110VAC you would have to use an inverter, which would consume that battery very quickly.

For such circumstances you usually need a car battery.
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Old October 19th, 2006, 05:48 PM   #14
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Thanks for thinking along with me Carlos. But there's a thing I do not understand. Take a look at this: http://www.jvcpro.co.uk/getResource2...1g.pdf?id=6418

a JVC field monitor which runs on both AC as DC.
AC: 120v x 0.9A = 108 watt
DC: 12v x 4.3A = 51.6 watt

So via battery half the power needed.

How do they do that? Do they use a hocus pocus inverter? Or two different manners of powering the screen? If second option, there must be some way to do this with my dream setup, or not?
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Old October 19th, 2006, 08:42 PM   #15
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I can't remember now how a conversion was computed to get from 12VDC to 110VAC. You lost a lot of Amps in the middle.

But it all depends on the efficency of the conversion.

Who knows what you may have powering with AC that you can't have with DC, which is probably the case with that JVC.

In any case, field monitors eat up a lot of battery, particularly those CRT types. LCDs are much better.
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