Benq FP241W (1080p/HDMI/Component) at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > The View: Video Display Hardware and Software

The View: Video Display Hardware and Software
Video Monitors and Media Players for field or studio use (all display technologies).


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old November 20th, 2006, 06:16 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: The Hague, The Netherlands
Posts: 112
Benq FP241W (1080p/HDMI/Component)

Did somebody try this new Benq monitor? It seems to be better then the Dell 24 inch.



Some specs:
  • Screen Size: 24"
  • Panel type: P-MVA panel
  • Resolution: 1920x1200(WUXGA)
  • Pixel Pitch: 0.270 mm
  • Brightness: 500cd/㎡
  • Contrast Ratio: 1000:1
  • Response Time: 16ms( 6ms GTG)
  • Display Area: 518.4 x 324.0 (mm)
  • Display Colors: 16.7 million
  • Viewing Angle: 178/178(CR>=10)
  • Input Signals: D-Sub/DVI-D/S-Video/Composite/Component/HDMI


Some info:

Full HD Format Support 1080p

Unlike conventional LCD monitors, the FP241W features complete HD support, so you can enjoy the most dazzlingly video possible. Experience lifelike video with all your new generation electronics, such as the latest game consoles and HD DVD players.

HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface)


The BenQ FP241W is the world's first LCD monitor with HDMI. HDMI not only enables 5Gbps data transfers, but eliminates the need for signal conversions, ensuring the best quality video. In addition, unlike other high-performance displays, the FP241W uses only a single HDMI cable, which carries the best quality video signals. The result is less clutter and hassle-free installation.

Unequaled Picture Quality

With AMA technology built into the FP241W, it reduces grey-to-grey response times to a mere 8ms, ensuring ultra-smooth video without ghosting. Even with highly dynamic content such as movies and games, video is crisp and clean.. Additionally, exclusive Senseye™ technology and a 800:1 contrast ratio ensure that the FP241W delivers vibrant colors and exquisitely rendered details.

Some reviews:

TFT Central
TrustedReviews
Bit-tech.net

Last edited by Marc Jayson; November 21st, 2006 at 02:15 AM.
Marc Jayson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 24th, 2006, 08:19 PM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Posts: 735
My understanding is that the monitor does not support 1:1 pixel mapping.

That means that if you plug your DVD player/Blu-Ray Player into the HDMI input, it will stretch your 1080 image to fill all 1200 pixels.

I have spoken to Benq in Australia and they have said that they are releasing a firmware upgrade in December to rectify the problem so I'm going to hold off from getting this monitor until then.
John Hewat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 25th, 2006, 03:51 AM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: The Hague, The Netherlands
Posts: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Hewat
My understanding is that the monitor does not support 1:1 pixel mapping.

That means that if you plug your DVD player/Blu-Ray Player into the HDMI input, it will stretch your 1080 image to fill all 1200 pixels.

I have spoken to Benq in Australia and they have said that they are releasing a firmware upgrade in December to rectify the problem so I'm going to hold off from getting this monitor until then.
Yep you're right about the update.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TFT Central
Official News: BenQ FP241W 1:1 Pixel Mapping Fix Coming
November 19th 2006


As we reported a few days ago, there has recently been word across the internet that there would be a firmware update for the FP241W to fix the main gripe everyone seemed to have with the screen, the lack of aspect ratio options and 1:1 pixel mapping. We can confirm that UK management at BenQ have confirmed that this WILL be happening, and while there is limited detail at this time, BenQ have stated that the "24W series will have new firmware to phase in new functions, such as display mode//Windows Vista-DDC/CI". This confirmation only came on Friday, and more details will follow soon. This upgrade will not be possible by the user directly, and I would imagine screens would need to be sent to service centres for the update to be applied. New stock after a certain point (expected December) will have this updated firmware in place.
Marc Jayson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 29th, 2006, 04:27 PM   #4
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 32
So, does the Beng also display HD coming in through DVI?

I've heard so many references to HDV editors not being able to see HiDef without going through something like the Matrox MXO that I'm confused on the subject.

(Will actually be editing DVCPRO HD on one of the new dual core Mac Pros.)
Gene Latimer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 30th, 2006, 08:59 AM   #5
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Wyomissing, PA
Posts: 1,141
Images: 57
The gateway 24" already has 1:1 mapping and is available now. What makes the benq so much better?
Peter Ferling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 30th, 2006, 10:59 PM   #6
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 32
Again . . . with either the Beng or the Gateway, does one need anymore than the DVI connection to watch 1080 video?

Or, is it necessary to have something like a Kona card or BlackMagic or Matrox to pass the signal through?
Gene Latimer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 10th, 2006, 07:00 PM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ottawa, ON
Posts: 471
Gene, what do you mean? If you have an HD signal, and you are routing it out a DVI connection, you can route it to the monitor ..?

Maybe detail your query differently ...

GB
R Geoff Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 11th, 2006, 12:09 PM   #8
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Wyomissing, PA
Posts: 1,141
Images: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Latimer
Again . . . with either the Beng or the Gateway, does one need anymore than the DVI connection to watch 1080 video?

Or, is it necessary to have something like a Kona card or BlackMagic or Matrox to pass the signal through?
Kinda of an open ended question. If you have a dual head card, then HD video on the editor is passed as overlay. This depends on the editing app, and graphics card.

If your hooking up a cable box to watch tv, or dvd player, etc. Then you can use the component input (in which case the Gateway monitor will allow 1:1 mapping in software settings). If your cable box/input device has HDMI, then you need an HDMI to DVI adaptor. Again setting 1:1 mapping in the monitor software if so equipped.

Some versions of Nvidia cards and driver software directly support HD signals and allow 1:1 mapping, (even if the monitor does not).

If you want to use two montiors as dual PC for editing, and need a third for HDTV monitoring, then you can use a Kona or BM card. Otherwise, you can use the Matrox three head card and pass the signal as overlay.

Bascially, you can consider these PC flat panel monitors nothing more than HDTV sets without the built in tuners. In which case they are cheaper if you have a cable box to for tuning/channel changing. However, comparably sized HDTV's cost twice as much (the tuners add to the cost). There is a savings by using a these PC monitors as dual purpose HDTV sets. (Which is how I have my gateway setup at my home office where space is limited).

I hope that answers some of you questions. I will be using three monitors, a quatro 3450 for PC edits, and passing the HD signal via a Xena card to an Sony LMD LCD.

BTW, I'm keeping my 21" CRT's for PC edits as I also do photoshop and photography work and even these LCD's can't compare.
Peter Ferling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 14th, 2006, 04:47 PM   #9
New Boot
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 14
Okay, some clarification

Hey guys, I thought I should clarify a few things about using these computer monitors as video HD production monitors. I hope this info helps:

1) If using Final Cut Pro, you most definitely need an HD capture card or Matrox box to output a real signal [component or DVI] (spending between $1000 to $1600 in addition to the monitor). FCP has a so-so quality trick that can spit the video out as a desktop across your graphics card (called Cinema Desktop), but it is for rough cuts only. It is NOT good for real evaluation.

2) While the 1:1 pixel mapping is great for evaluating detail, NONE of these computer monitors is appropriate for looking at video color and contrast. At all. The gamma is weird and un-video like. Only use a high res LCD for detail and not color or black levels.

Please spread the word. If you color correct on these things, you are in for trouble. But the detail is perfect.

-Christopher S. Johnson
Christopher Johnson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 14th, 2006, 06:25 PM   #10
Trustee
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Little Rock
Posts: 1,383
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christopher Johnson
If using Final Cut Pro, you most definitely need an HD capture card or Matrox box to output a real signal [component or DVI] (spending between $1000 to $1600 in addition to the monitor). FCP has a so-so quality trick that can spit the video out as a desktop across your graphics card (called Cinema Desktop), but it is for rough cuts only. It is NOT good for real evaluation.
-Christopher S. Johnson

Just an FYI... The Matrox MXO you spoke of uses the desktop cinema function of FCP to output video.

And in my opinion it is not a "so-so quality trick" for rough cuts only!
David W. Jones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 14th, 2006, 06:52 PM   #11
New Boot
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 14
No really

Quote:
Originally Posted by David W. Jones
Just an FYI... The Matrox MXO you spoke of uses the desktop cinema function of FCP to output video.

And in my opinion it is not a "so-so quality trick" for rough cuts only!
No....really. Even Apple will tell you that its not a real production quality video signal.

Final Cut Pro's Cinema Desktop is a trick, and not real video production. It can be helpful for an off-line cut but nothing more. That is all it was ever intended for. Its there just as a helpful reference. I have used it, both for SD and HD. ALL professionals agree about this.

-Christopher S. Johnson
Christopher Johnson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 15th, 2006, 08:18 AM   #12
Trustee
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Little Rock
Posts: 1,383
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christopher Johnson
ALL professionals agree about this.
-Christopher S. Johnson

That's a pretty wide statement, since I am a professional and disagree.
David W. Jones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 16th, 2006, 01:15 AM   #13
New Boot
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 14
yeah

Quote:
Originally Posted by David W. Jones
That's a pretty wide statement, since I am a professional and disagree.
Yeah it was intended to be a wide statement. If I was more truthful though, I would say that the 30 or so video professionals I have met in Los Angeles think of Cinema Desktop as a cute trick, and OK for reference, but consider the image to be lacking in accuracy and dependability for judging truly what the video looks like.

I wish I was wrong, I really do. Can you imagine how cool it would be to have an accurate HD image to view without a capture card at all. Just going out of my graphics card to a monitor. That would be amazingly cool and save me $1600.

But its a cool and handy thing to have for offline cuts, getting the story right, ect.

-Christopher
Christopher Johnson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 16th, 2006, 11:15 PM   #14
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
Posts: 735
Let's say for example that I bought one of the new BlackMagic Intensity HDMI Cards and output to either this Benq or to a nice big Sony Bravia Full HD LCD TV would I be getting an accurate image in terms of both detail and color correction?
John Hewat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 17th, 2006, 10:25 AM   #15
New Boot
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 14
Depends

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Hewat
Let's say for example that I bought one of the new BlackMagic Intensity HDMI Cards and output to either this Benq or to a nice big Sony Bravia Full HD LCD TV would I be getting an accurate image in terms of both detail and color correction?
It depends on what you are doing. I may be too restrictive in my opinions on this board. My opinions are from the point of view of someone who has to hand the edit master tape over to a broadcaster, not just a hobbyist. So if any of you are just doing this for experience and fun then please excuse my strictness of opinion.

My experience in this arena is using the AJA HD card, going component HD to a Dell 24" computer LCD monitor, set for 1:1 pixel representation. I assume you can also do this with the BenQ with that firmware update that was mentioned earlier. This set up, for professional standards, gives very very accurate DETAIL, with every pixel of the HD image represented. Its the best way to catch a "dead" pixel from the camera, or check focus.

But I found that trying to calibrate the colors and blacks of the video world was strange and unreliable for real broadcast color correction because the "color-space" and gamma was different on a computer monitor.

On a "TV" LCD like the Bravia, these weird color/black spaces might be better, but not nearly as reliable as a CRT old school tube HDTV that has been properly calibrated.

But look, if you are just doing a personal project, then by all means, go ahead and calibrate your LCD that you have with color bar method and go have some fun!

The word on professional street is this:

Use two monitors in the edit suite for best results -

1.) a real CRT HDTV, even if it doesn't have the right amount of resolution. This is for color and blacks accuracy. Here is an example at around $2500.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...ist&sku=326928

I'm on a budget and have a "prosumer" high end CRT HDTV from Sony that was discontinued but can still be found in some consumer stores. And I calibrate it religiously with color bars. It comes in 30" and 34" and has the "Super Fine Pitch Tube" moniker in the name. Not perfect but much better than any flat panel.

2.) and one of those BenQ or Dell full res LCD computer monitors for the detail

This one-two combo is what many consider the way to go for right now for broadcast level HD post production. Check out the musings of HD consultant Mike Curtis here:

www.hdforindies.com

Hope this helps. I wish it was easier, I really do.

-Christopher
Christopher Johnson is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > The View: Video Display Hardware and Software

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:28 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network