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Video Monitors and Media Players for field or studio use (all display technologies).


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Old January 2nd, 2007, 05:49 PM   #1
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Best Monitor for Computer? Lcd or Crt?

Hi, my viewsonic pf790 just quit on me after six years so I need another monitor. The main purpose quality I'm looking for is the best jpeg quality. Most of the pictures I will be viewing are taken from my digital camera. Are the Pro series Lcds as good or better than the Crts now?

The rep at Viewsonic told me that if I have a monitor with a Dvi cable that the pictures I view will be even better quality as long as my computer has Dvi capibility. Is that true?

I appreciate any help. I am not up to date on the new technology so I want to make sure I'm getting the best product. Price does not matter.

Thank you,
Tony
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Old January 3rd, 2007, 10:14 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Marino
Hi, my viewsonic pf790 just quit on me after six years so I need another monitor. The main purpose quality I'm looking for is the best jpeg quality. Most of the pictures I will be viewing are taken from my digital camera. Are the Pro series Lcds as good or better than the Crts now?

The rep at Viewsonic told me that if I have a monitor with a Dvi cable that the pictures I view will be even better quality as long as my computer has Dvi capibility. Is that true?

I appreciate any help. I am not up to date on the new technology so I want to make sure I'm getting the best product. Price does not matter.

Thank you,
Tony
I don't have an exact answer, just observations things to consider. Apparently the issue becomes do you want RGB or Y, R-Y, B-Y, aka component video. I am a fan of component video because it is the home for most CRT models, and I think they deliver a more consistent image, and anyone viewing the screen will pretty much see the same thing, even it they are viewing "off axis". Whereas LCD viewing pretty much is limited to one person sitting directly in front of the monitor.

Additionally, if I'm not mistaken, LCD's begin to very slowly fade from the moment you start using one, that is a variable I would not be a fan of. Notice I said slowly. By slowly I mean after 3-6 months you may need to re-calibrate, and every 3-6 months for a couple of years until they can no longer be adjusted.

In theory you are supposed to adjust a television monitor every day, but I found I could go a very long time on my CRT's without adjusting them. The bad news is Sony no longer is making CRT's. I would suggest before you buy an LCD you go visit someone who has the exact same model you plan on purchasing and see for yourself if it will suit you.
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Old January 3rd, 2007, 11:56 PM   #3
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For a *computer* monitors, I would prefer using a LCD.

If you have multiple monitors (i.e. dual monitors on your computer, and a broadcast monitor), they won't interfere each other and the small bezel is nice.

For color (and other) accuracy for video work, broadcast monitors tend to be best (use one in addition to computer monitors).

For print work I'm not sure. Really good CRTs like the Sony Artisan have been discontinued. For a more informed opinion, see:
http://www.outbackphoto.com/tforum/v...p?TopicID=1700

Quote:
Additionally, if I'm not mistaken, LCD's begin to very slowly fade from the moment you start using one, that is a variable I would not be a fan of. Notice I said slowly. By slowly I mean after 3-6 months you may need to re-calibrate, and every 3-6 months for a couple of years until they can no longer be adjusted.
The eCinemasys broadcast-grade LCDs don't drift at all (according to them). Consumer LCDs might drift a little, but I don't think anywhere as much as CRTs do.
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Old January 4th, 2007, 08:58 AM   #4
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It depends on the level of output you need and what else you're doing. If you're just working with family picts and want basic WYSIWYG accuracy, then a decent LCD (such as the gateways, benq, etc) with the newer panels will work. However, you'll need a calibration tool, such as a Huey, to properly adjust it.

I have at home a 22" Gateway alongside my 21" Viewsonic. Connected to dual head Quadro FX1000. Once adjusted, the LCD closely matches the Viewsonic (but you can see a slight improvement with the CRT in terms of contrast).
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Old January 4th, 2007, 03:10 PM   #5
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I have been looking at the Sony KD-34XBR970 HD model. It is big 190lb crt and sony still makes it . I was thinking of using it for color correction. It cost $750 at B&H. I would set it a few feet away to get a great picture to edit with.
Hey it's HD, CRT, Cheap so will it work ?
I know some editing suites use bigger screens LCD or Plasma so size SHOULD NOT BE AN ISSUE.
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Old January 4th, 2007, 10:44 PM   #6
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Video monitor is a bad choice here.

If I'm not reading this wrong, the OP is looking for something to monitor JPEG Stills.

This presumes, I think, that the images are progressively scan digital photos - not interlaced content at all.

So there's NO need for a broadcast calibrated video monitor.

In fact, transcoding progressive digital stills onto an interlaced video signal for display on an video monitor would be a bad idea prior to evaluating them. You'd lose resolution and chance introducing field effect artifacts by using this method.

A quality computer monitor will outperform nearly ANY video monitor for this task, particularly if there's a way to set it up properly in regard to colorometry.

Digital stills and video signals are two completely different animals.

Mapping one to the other always required care.

My 2 cents anyway.
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