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Video Monitors and Media Players for field or studio use (all display technologies).


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Old March 7th, 2007, 05:15 PM   #1
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Cheap HD monitor for JVC Pro HD

So if this camera outputs analog component video that can go into an HDTV, I don't understand the fuss about finding a good HD monitor. VGA is analog component. All you need is a straight component/VGA cable and a cheap computer monitor. The power consumption would be the biggest issue then, but at <$150 for a 17" 16:9 720p VGA LCD, it's worth it.

Am I missing something?
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Old March 7th, 2007, 06:09 PM   #2
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A cheap computer monitor is not a good HD monitor for professional video work. You'll find some pretty good explanations on this issue on quite a few threads if you run a search.
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Old March 7th, 2007, 06:12 PM   #3
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and VGA is RGB, while video is YUV. you would need a converter.
and both signal have different sync. signals.
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Old March 7th, 2007, 07:55 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Antony Michael Wilson View Post
A cheap computer monitor is not a good HD monitor for professional video work. You'll find some pretty good explanations on this issue on quite a few threads if you run a search.
I should rephrase to 'inexpensive'. An inexpensive computer LCD is orders of magnitude beyond something like a Nebtek. The main difference is power and durability; for quality there is no contest between 480x234 and 1280x720 or whatever it is.

The YUV vs RGB is a good point, but it's easy enough to convert:
http://www.siliconchip.com.au/cms/A_101537/article.html
http://forum.ecoustics.com/bbs/messages/5/62545.html
http://elm-chan.org/works/yuv2rgb/report.html
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Old March 7th, 2007, 08:09 PM   #5
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A cheap 720P LCD monitor (19" and bigger) with component inputs would work fine for judging focus on set, but that's about it.
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Old March 7th, 2007, 08:11 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Dashwood View Post
A cheap 720P LCD monitor (19" and bigger) with component inputs would work fine for judging focus on set, but that's about it.
It could be used for composition as well as color calibration.
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Old March 7th, 2007, 08:43 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Jad Meouchy View Post
It could be used for composition as well as color calibration.
Sure, but the viewfinder works just as well for composition, but my point was that a cheap LCD monitor on set can't be trusted for colour calibration.
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Old March 8th, 2007, 01:22 AM   #8
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Through HDVrack on my laptop (TFT screen calibrated with Spider2 Color calibration) I have very good results using this as my HD monitor on location.
I'm sure a real HD monitor will look better, but so far it did the job.
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Old March 8th, 2007, 11:32 AM   #9
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I have had stellar results using a 75ft component cable from an HD100 to a Dell 24" LCD monitor. (it has component input and can view up to 1920x1080 resolution)

Focus can be trusted 100% on it.

I use trucolor so I'm not worried about color after manually white balancing.

at $ 850 we paid for it on sale a year ago, I consider that "cheap" and effective HD monitoring.
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Old March 10th, 2007, 02:17 AM   #10
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If you can still find one, the Sony MFM-HT75W is great! It's a 17" 720p monitor. A perfect match for the HD100 on the cheap. I paid just $450 for mine. It's sharp and can be trusted for focus. Color is not bad either.
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Old March 10th, 2007, 03:07 AM   #11
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I believe that Sony makes a wide screen version, the Sony MFM-HT75WS. Another similar option, for about $100 less, is the Samsung TFT SyncMaster 940MW, although it's 19" you basically get the same screen width as the 17" widescreen Sony.

What makes these monitors very usefull is that they are relatively small and portable, specially the Sony which can be mounted inside a pelican case. For location work you can monitor your HDV camera (RGB) and in your editing suite they can double as an extra computer monitor (VGA & DVI) as well as a video monitor if you are editing in DV (s-video and composite video), or both at the same time (pip).

I believe either model is fairly accurate for non critical color correction with basic calibration (I'm assuming that you wouldn't want to do critical color correction on a $400 monitor).

best of luck
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Old March 10th, 2007, 03:54 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Kalunga Lima View Post
I believe that Sony makes a wide screen version, the Sony MFM-HT75WS.
Actually the MFM-HT75W is a widescreen. I have it and that's the correct model number. There's no such thing as a MFM-HT75WS. I think it's just an Internet error. Sony makes a 4:3 version but it's a 19".
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Old March 10th, 2007, 12:41 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Tim Dashwood View Post
Sure, but the viewfinder works just as well for composition, .
Perhaps for the most experienced operators. But it sure isn't adequate for me. I really need a big image to assess. I've even had trouble with 9" monitors.
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Old March 10th, 2007, 06:25 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Tim Dashwood View Post
Sure, but the viewfinder works just as well for composition,
Most of the time it does, but I just filmed a Jazz group at a club this week and I can tell you that it's not always easy. Since JVC opted to use a 4:3 viewfinder and LCD for a 16:9 camera there were several times where my camerapeople and I experienced minor problems composing the shot. The pitch black background of the club blended into the letterboxing on the LCD. Even with the action safe guides on screen, it's a moment of confusion that's un-needed during a live shoot. Using a cheap portable DVD player with an 16:9 LCD and a video input helps and we have a few. Unfortunately the circumstances of the shoot prevented two of the camerapeople from using them, one of them me. It came out pretty good regardless.

Now if only New York City could extend their anti-smoking laws to pot smokers in these clubs. Imagine trying to run a camera when you are standing in a very visible haze of marijuana smoke and absolutely no air circulation. Even the musicians complained!
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Old March 23rd, 2007, 11:22 AM   #15
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Just to follow up, I purchased a Mayflash YUV->RGB converter from SewellDirect for ~$55 and it works well. While it does appear to be a european model, the necessary AC adapter was included. The unit is very small, very light, and the picture quality is excellent. Its little power adapter feeds it 6VDC, so it should be able to run directly off four AA batteries or a step-down from 12+VDC coming out of a battery pack.

As much as fun as it would have been to build the device from the painfully simple plans, the price paid was so fair that I couldn't justify spending even one hour with the soldering iron.

The first time you see raw HD100 footage on a high resolution monitor, your jaw will drop. The clarity is unreal.

FYI, I was using cheap 10ft VGA and RCA cables as interconnects and there was no noticeable noise on the monitor. This little thing must put out a pretty strong signal.


For field previewing, I plan to use an 800x480 16:9 VGA monitor ala Xenarc/Lilliput. Resolution should be sufficient for focusing, especially if I can disable scaling and run at x720. Color accuracy will not be expected from a $90 monitor, though they are very adjustable.
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