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Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


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Old August 27th, 2007, 03:17 PM   #1
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Traditions in wedding video forms...

I haven't been a member of this group for long, but have appreciated reading through posts and picking up ideas.

However it appears to me that as with any group of human beings, traditions/styles develop/have developed which become the accepted norm for what a 'wedding video' should be.

Traditions/norms sometimes become deeply entrenched such that to do anything outside those norms is frowned on and seen as unacceptable, or 'unprofessional', etc.

I'm not at all for re inventing the wheel on every occasion, but being locked into 'this is how it is done', 'this is the format', 'such things are not done', can have things settle down to being effectively wedding by numbers, limiting, with those who step outside the norms being brought back into line with dismissive comments.

I get the distinct impression that several sections of my latest wedding are outside 'the traditions', one I've referred to on another thread - text of hymns in the video, but another I'll mention for what it is worth.

The couple are both from a farming background and the guy is a real gun shearer. The gal has her own flock of sheep and one day when I was at the girls parents farm I filmed them shearing the girls flock. Mr of course was fluid and fast, a study in time and motion. Mrs was all over the show, slow and struggling but succeeding - neither of course dressed in their wedding finery. So...as part of the introduction to the wedding I have put side by side clips of them both shearing - only I've slowed him down to about 30% and speeded her up to 300% so she shears her sheep in the time it takes him to do a couple of strokes...
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Old August 27th, 2007, 04:12 PM   #2
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I think it's great to not conform to the norm just for the sake of being standard. However, there are reasons that wedding videographers often do things alike. Because it works and people like it. When I started out, I tried hard to be myself and be different. What I quickly learned is that alot of things I was avoiding that others did were things that I should have been doing. So, I now have my own style and way of doing business; I have unique things that I do that few (if not none) of my competitors do and that gives me a marketing edge. However, I recognize what others are doing right and try my best to adopt that way of doing things.

As far as the sheep thing, that's great if it fits with the B&Gs style. Conforming the video to their likes and feelings is the way you will get clients to fall in love with your work.
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Old August 27th, 2007, 04:27 PM   #3
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As far as the sheep thing, that's great if it fits with the B&Gs style. Conforming the video to their likes and feelings is the way you will get clients to fall in love with your work.
Thanks Adam,

The couple haven't seen it yet - and won't until they run it first time!! But I know they will love it. I can imagine now their responce...would like to be a fly on the wall...
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Old August 27th, 2007, 05:58 PM   #4
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Yeah, I wish I was there each time a client viewed their video the first time.
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Old August 27th, 2007, 08:01 PM   #5
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Yeah, I wish I was there each time a client viewed their video the first time.
Hmmmmm...there's an idea in there somewhere....

Hmmmmm....
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Old August 27th, 2007, 11:12 PM   #6
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Hmmmmm...there's an idea in there somewhere....

Hmmmmm....
The reason I generally don't do screenings with the bride and groom is because I feel it should be a moment between them. They will enjoy it more if they can reminisce between themselves without some strange dude sitting there. Don't think I haven't thought about it though.
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Old August 27th, 2007, 11:15 PM   #7
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Actually, I was thinking of videotaping their reactions to use as a marketing video...
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Old August 28th, 2007, 08:47 AM   #8
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Hmmm, now that IS an idea!
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Old August 28th, 2007, 11:23 AM   #9
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In general, I think that wedding videography has evolved so fast because many people are not just confirming to the norms. Within this online community as well as several others, it is the work that differs the most that often gets the most attention. Of cours you will see things that are ocmpletely different and they might not get the biggest response, but more often than not I think that would be based on the quality of what was done as well as the new idea- as opposed to it being shunned fo being too different. We can't escape our own personal biases and schemas when viewing others work, so those will always come to play, but I think they would be more supportive of unique ideas rather than frowning on them.

Your sheep idea, to me, doesn't sound completely different at all- it sounds your bringing in footage from their everyday life and that is what it entails. Some may dislike the idea of speed changes and call it 'cheesey' but I don't think that is because its different, I think that is more of an inherent reaction to watching somthing fake. There are also a diversity of preferences out there, so it is hard to put something together that won't appeal to a certain group- the challenge is in knowing your client and thier community of family/friends and making sure that what your presenting is in sync with them- unless thats too conformist for you.

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Old August 28th, 2007, 11:44 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Renton Maclachlan View Post
...

However it appears to me that as with any group of human beings, traditions/styles develop/have developed which become the accepted norm for what a 'wedding video' should be.

Traditions/norms sometimes become deeply entrenched such that to do anything outside those norms is frowned on and seen as unacceptable, or 'unprofessional', etc.

...
Just remember that the video is not a personal expression or an artisitic statement on your part but rather you are a craftsperson who has been hired by a client to make them happy. The product you deliver to them may or may not be what would satisfy you but instead needs to be what satisfies them. If they want by-the-book traditional, that's what you give them. If they want cutting-edge creativity, that's what you give them. What YOU want to see in the video is completely irrelevant.
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Old August 28th, 2007, 12:57 PM   #11
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What YOU want to see in the video is completely irrelevant.
Last week I had a client calling me that she really like the video but...In the evening there was a 15 minute speech from his aunt and I added the complete speech in the video. Now his aunt had really put in some effort writing this speech which was quite funny, I though it was not more then normal to include it completely since it was so personal. Well, the bride found it quite boring having to listen to the speech and she didn't like it that she had to fast forward on her remote. She asked if I could change it and cut the speech back to at least half the time.

This was something I didn't expect and the dvd's were all ready and delivered, when I told her it would cost her extra she wasn't very happy about it.

I'm just thinking here that I made the decission to include the speech completely, something I wanted to see in the video and based on the clients reaction, it proves that what i thought was irrelevant. What could have been a very happy client has turned into a frustrated client now. but I mean, how far can you go? You can't expect the client to sit next to you when you edit. I ask a lot of questions before I start editing but you really can't cover every single bit, it's also impossible to get inside each and every clients head to exactly know what is going on.

I think it's all about finding the right balance between the clients expectations and your own filming and editing style. That usually works 95% of the time for me, above example belongs to the remaining 5% :D.

Last edited by Noa Put; August 28th, 2007 at 01:33 PM.
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Old August 28th, 2007, 01:03 PM   #12
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Just remember that the video is not a personal expression or an artisitic statement on your part but rather you are a craftsperson who has been hired by a client to make them happy. The product you deliver to them may or may not be what would satisfy you but instead needs to be what satisfies them. If they want by-the-book traditional, that's what you give them. If they want cutting-edge creativity, that's what you give them. What YOU want to see in the video is completely irrelevant.
Reading this thread I had a thought, and considering my backlog that's a miracle, but.............. This wedding video business is more about the human and emotional side of things rather than the technical drama we can do with flash or cheeese. hehe, another way to put it, I have a client who wanted me to make sure each relative got equal face time on the video..........to her, her video is about her family, not if I add cricket noises to her video........which I did. :} This is truely the one major unique expression of video, dynamic expression of emotion by relating events in motion.
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Old August 28th, 2007, 01:45 PM   #13
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I have never shot a wedding video, and probably never will, but this thread brings up something that I am curious about.

I was wondering if it would make sense to construct the video normally, with highlights and so forth, and leave long and potentially important scenes, as "DVD Extras", much like a large production movie.

In this case, maybe including the entire speech as an extra, with just a few passages shown in the main video. Other things might be the entire walk to the altar and exchanging of vows, the first dance, the rehearsal and candids, etc.

Things that might interrupt the overall flow or feel of the video, but would be nice momentos for some members.

Just wondering.
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Old August 28th, 2007, 02:03 PM   #14
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She asked if I could change it and cut the speech back to at least half the time.

This was something I didn't expect and the dvd's were all ready and delivered, when I told her it would cost her extra she wasn't very happy about it.

I'm just thinking here that I made the decission to include the speech completely, something I wanted to see in the video and based on the clients reaction, it proves that what i thought was irrelevant. What could have been a very happy client has turned into a frustrated client now. but I mean, how far can you go? You can't expect the client to sit next to you when you edit.
I offer a deluxe edit option that includes a 4 hrs. final edit with the client. I give them my edited version to take home, make notes on changes. They bring back the changes and I give them the final video.

I do it all the time with commercial work, so it makes sense to have a happy customer and extra cash :-)
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Old August 28th, 2007, 03:33 PM   #15
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Oldy enough....

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Yeah, I wish I was there each time a client viewed their video the first time.
I have made that one of my selling points. I'll watch it with them and if there are any problems, I'll re-burn the thing right there to make sure it works with their DVD player (I bring my alienware monster to the client location to do an re-burns, title changes, etc).

I've been able to do that for all but one client. I love to see them watch it. It just makes my day when they point and "Ooooo" and "Ahhhh" and say things like "Oh I didn't know they came, I wish I saw them so I could say hi" etc.
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