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Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


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Old June 17th, 2003, 10:18 AM   #16
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heheh
with regard to kids, not only do they give those killer shots, but they can also be a killer to you...

watch you dont trip... thats one thing many people forget...

always look where your going BEFORE you do it...
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Old December 13th, 2006, 07:13 AM   #17
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My Wedding disaster

I went to the reception headed off the first problem. The wireless frequenc was pickup a buzz. So I change frequenc problem solved right. Well wedding day here comes the P. A. system. I didn't think about asking them what frequenc they were using. Needless to say the sound was a wash.
Not to mention the tape problem i had. You can read about that on another page. It was a big learning experience.
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Old December 13th, 2006, 01:13 PM   #18
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Definitely discuss with the bride and groom before the wedding, if there is a wedding coordinator discuss with them as well. I ran into a problem a few months ago with a coordinator who did not know that it was the brides order to have a little bit of extra light during the cake cutting. it almost got me in trouble. most places you will go to a reception at will be able to boost the light a bit for key moment like that.

one tip I can make sure to tell you is to pay very close attention to white balance. this can completely ruin your video if it is off, and if all cams are not balanced to the same card in the same location, it can throw off each individual camera and make for a long experience back in the editing room. Trust me when I tell you that brides are not happy when their white dress does not appear white.....not horribly sure why, but apparently its important :)

one other item to invest in is a set of warm cards (www.warmcards.com) they cost about 60 bucks for a set, and are a lifesaver in a flourescent environment. the minus green card is one card I never ever leave home without.
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Old December 13th, 2006, 03:11 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garret Ambrosio
What aboutr lighting guys...Any suggestions? For the ceremony and for the reception. Especially if the B&G would like shots of their friends dancing in almost complete darkness.
I find ceremony locations in houses of worship are rather well lit. Only two churches in my area are dark as masoleums. In any case it is very important to discuss the use of additional light with the church officals. Some have very strict rules in this regard.

At receptions, I always bring along a 700 watt floodlight with umbrella for lighting the dance floor during traditional dances. The extra light makes my images look sooo much better! However, additional lighting like this has a number of issues which may prevent use. 1) Will your client be comfortable with the additional light? Will the reception venue allow it? Can you secure the fixture so it absolutely can not cause accidental injury or damage? My light poles are always secured to something solid. Can you get the reception venue manager to keep the house lights brighter than normal so you really won't need the additional light? These are a few examples I have encountered. If I can't use the flood light I don't worry.

Regardless, I always have a 10 watt on camera light with an attached diffuser for close-up work.
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Old December 13th, 2006, 04:51 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Waldemar Winkler
At receptions, I always bring along a 700 watt floodlight with umbrella for lighting the dance floor during traditional dances.
Wow. Do the sprinkler systems ever go off?

I'd be run out of town on the first rail with that much wattage. (Assuming folks could still see me well enough to run me down).

And why are we giving advice to questions asked over 3 years ago? :)
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Old December 13th, 2006, 07:47 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adi Head
i'll be bringing:
about 5 hours of tape
a wireless transimitter to hook up one channel of sound to the dj console
a mini light with battery pack and belt

thanks
Adi, you might need more tape.
Set up a second cam (it downt have to be great) for the ceremony, and make sure it's not in your field of view and vice versa!

You need a tripopd for your main cam, unless it's a shoulder mount type cam.
Put your wireless transmitter (or a recorder) on the groom.
You need another mic for the ambient, wheteher it's the ceremony or the reception. Speeches and dancing are lifeless unless you can hear the crowd.

Talk to the photographer to make sure you work together , not in competition.

Andy
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Old December 13th, 2006, 09:21 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Wason
Adi, you might need more tape.
Agreed. (Since the couple has about 3 kids by now).
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Old December 14th, 2006, 10:06 AM   #23
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I sure didnt realize the thread was that old when I posted on it....but there was definitely some good advice and a few things I had not ever though of on it. When andy said work with the photographer.....that one is a must. I have had a few photographers that I absolutely refuse to work with because they are not video camera aware....makes for an unhappy bride when the photographer jumps in front of the video during the kiss.....
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Old December 14th, 2006, 10:10 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Steele
Wow. Do the sprinkler systems ever go off?

I'd be run out of town on the first rail with that much wattage. (Assuming folks could still see me well enough to run me down).

And why are we giving advice to questions asked over 3 years ago? :)
Properly diffused and positioned, a 700 watt flood light can brighten a small area without significantly impacting the overall ambience. Using a small AC dimmer allows even moe control.

Questions need to be revisited because everything changes.
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Old December 14th, 2006, 10:23 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Waldemar Winkler
Properly diffused and positioned, a 700 watt flood light can brighten a small area without significantly impacting the overall ambience. Using a small AC dimmer allows even moe control.
Maybe, but the reception venues are dimmed for a reason. And it kind of defeats the purpose of candle lit dances. I've only had the need for "slightly in your face" footage using 20 watts at about 8 feet away. The shots are clean enough considering it's not my fault for the low light to begin with.

But hey... if you can get away with it, more power to you. It's just my experience that most people won't complain even if they really don't like it.
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Old December 14th, 2006, 06:52 PM   #26
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I think Rick makes a very good point here.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Steele
Maybe, but the reception venues are dimmed for a reason. And it kind of defeats the purpose of candle lit dances. I've only had the need for "slightly in your face" footage using 20 watts at about 8 feet away. The shots are clean enough considering it's not my fault for the low light to begin with.

But hey... if you can get away with it, more power to you. It's just my experience that most people won't complain even if they really don't like it.
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Old December 15th, 2006, 03:58 PM   #27
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Stills

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Quance
You might also get a copy of the stills taken by the still photographer and incorporate that into a montage, if that's in the budget.
I ALWAYS try to get stills. They ust work better some times. My latest wedding has an AMAZING still taken by my wife of a dove release. I was busy with the close up of the kiss with doves fluttering all around but she got a great wide angle shot of doves all over with the couple kissing in the middle.

Couple absolutely loves the movie so mission accomplished.

jason
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