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Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


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Old March 9th, 2008, 11:33 PM   #1
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Final Edit for customer.

I always love watching everyones trailers/highlights and dont think I miss any on here. I do wonder what you deliver to the customer for the final project.

Besides the highlights.

On the full length DVD do you,
Leave in all audio as it happens and if any music, only background?
Use mainly music and only do voice overs and important things like special music, vows etc?
Do you show entire wedding, switching from cam a to cam b views, or only major cuts of the wedding?

I ask because we finally got to do a video only wedding, did not have to do the photography, and just a basic add on video. In total we have done 3 video weddings, 2 were basic add on, as we were the photographer, we added the video as much for our use and learning as anything, they did pay but only for basic straight forward video coverage.

We got great footage, audio etc. But these things happened.
Groom messed up the vows, I can edit and make it not SO bad, but will be obvious, not sure this is good to have on the final project.
#2, The best mans speach was totally with out class, was the brother and talked about grooms old girlfriends, in way too much detail, could tell bride was not happy at all. So I dont want to leave all that in, will probably use the little bit he said that was acceptable.

Would love to know what you include, and dont include on the final DVD.
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Old March 10th, 2008, 12:12 AM   #2
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Nothing is much worse for me than having to make changes in an edit. When I'm done, I want to stay that way :)

My only advice is get feedback from the client before you start cutting.
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Old March 10th, 2008, 03:44 AM   #3
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I include the whole ceremony, and various highlights from the reception - cake, garter/bouquet toss, dances, etc.

You're the editor - I've judiciously cut comments or things that seemed less than appropriate. You could in theory "loop" the dialog in for botched vows if the groom is available, etc. There are lots of options in post.

Here's the tricky part, knowing what to leave "as it was", and what to "enhance"... or delete for the sake of modesty! Perhaps this is the charm of "highlight" type final delivery <wink>?
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Old March 10th, 2008, 04:17 AM   #4
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In preparation watch out for the person/people who seem to deal in details more than anyone else....play to them.

Given that you know what you are doing, present the most finished product you can, but make one (or more) mistakes, something you can cough/blush/apologise for and fix.

Don't ever get caught doing this but leave the clients thinking they orchestrated the whole edit process.

That's the art of making a living producing videos for the public.... and more important, referred business.

Cheers.
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Old March 10th, 2008, 07:11 AM   #5
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Denny,
I tend to have several rules when comes to the edit. There is the "it was how it was" rule, where if he screwed up, she tripped, brides maids fell down, etc. I leave it in usually because that's what actually happened. I also try to apply the "grandma will see this" rule. I imagine if my grandma had to watch this would she be offended or upset. This includes off color groomsmen or brothers, and also people falling down drunk. It all depends on how they view they're day. If it was a good time had by all, and everybody was in basically a good mood, then no harm no foul. If it was miserable, then try to minimize it. I typically have mine with an opening montage, wedding pretty much ab-roll cut, and reception with intercuts of montage and live action. I will use real time-live audio when I can, but people usually say something dumb so I can't use the audio and have to put it in a montage. Good luck, and you'll get the feel of it after a few.
Bill
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Old March 10th, 2008, 07:36 AM   #6
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My feeling would be if it was painful to the bride I'd cut it down, but not out. It's a part of their lives, like it or not, and usually you can edit something like this tastefully without removing it.

I had one instance where the groomsmen were talking about a photo of one of the guys in his underwear in a bathroom, and I cut it so you know they were talking about 'something' but you never get the details -- makes it fun for everyone and nothing is x-rated.
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Old March 10th, 2008, 08:06 AM   #7
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Denny,

As an editor, I make my best judgement in taking shots off and leaving shots in on the final cut of the wedding. Then I give a watermarked version of the video to the client for review. They will have one week to review the video and get back to us. They are allowed to make any minor changes (such as removing or adding certain shots, changing music, etc.). Once the necessary changes are made, they will have one final chance to review the wedding (at our edit bay) if they wish. Once everything is approved, then I go ahead and burn the final DVD.

By involving the client in the edit process, you will give them a chance to have a final say in their video. You will also avoid any doubts you had in your editing. The challenge is to get them to communicate with you about the changes on time so that your workflow is not pushed back by them. We had some challenges initially when we introduce this process. Sometimes clients took 4-5 weeks to get back to us. But more we explained to them about the process during contract/ sign-up time, better it became.
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Old March 10th, 2008, 09:23 AM   #8
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Wow, thanks for all the great responses. I will take your advice and use my best judgement and give them a week to proof the DVD. I will edit it like I feel the bride and her family want to see it. Even the bestman's grandparents apoligized to me about him.
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Old March 10th, 2008, 09:59 AM   #9
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Denny,
FWIW I do not give them a preview copy. I state in the contract that special requests are appreciated, but once the editing process has begun any revisions after the fact will be subject to a charge unless it is a blatant error on the editors part (like mispellings, audio sync issues, etc.)
They hire you as an artist and should expect that you will do a great job for them. If you deliver on that promise, in other words don't let it out of the house until you are reasonably "happy" they should be happy every time. Trust your instincts.
Bill
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Old March 10th, 2008, 10:43 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Grant View Post
Denny,
FWIW I do not give them a preview copy. I state in the contract that special requests are appreciated, but once the editing process has begun any revisions after the fact will be subject to a charge unless it is a blatant error on the editors part (like mispellings, audio sync issues, etc.)
They hire you as an artist and should expect that you will do a great job for them. If you deliver on that promise, in other words don't let it out of the house until you are reasonably "happy" they should be happy every time. Trust your instincts.
Bill
Good point Bill, I am thinking of treating this in the same manner we do our photography. They come in and view a projection of the images in our presentation room with ceiling recessed speakers giving it a cinema like sound and experience. This is where they have the chance to say they are not pleased with something, knock on wood, has never happened. I could present the DVD this way and if they are happy they leave with it, if not I will make changes, but they have to come back and leave with nothing. I would bet that most would want to leave with the product as is.

I hate to leave it too open for changes, could get a customer who before its over changes everything.
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