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Old March 27th, 2008, 01:55 PM   #1
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Projector at Reception

Has anyone ever used this model of a projector from Dell for a reception? I am looking at purchasing it this week, and would love any feedback out there. Thanks!

http://tinyurl.com/2t9syq
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Old March 27th, 2008, 08:51 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Dawn Brennan View Post
Has anyone ever used this model of a projector from Dell for a reception? I am looking at purchasing it this week, and would love any feedback out there. Thanks!

http://tinyurl.com/2t9syq
No, I haven't used it, but I've used all kinds of projectors for video display for something just over 20 years.

I looked at the specs. You will be very pleased with this projector's performance. It has plenty of power for bright images, so long as you don't exceed a screen width of 10'.

What I didn't see (or missed) is the ability to mute the projector without turning it off. Usually a button on the projector's remote control, "muting" the video simply inserts a black "slide". The projected image is still there, just hidden from view until needed. With this feature you can actually start a presentation, pause it, and have it immediately available when you need it. No more paper cards in front of the projector lens, no more fumbling through OS menus to start the presentation. In any case, this is a very important user feature. Download the user manual and look for it.

Also look for keystone adjustment to plus or minus 30 degrees. A normal feature for most projectors.

The component to VGA adapter cable is a must. This allows you to connect the R/G/B primary color connections on a DVD player directly to the computer input. This keeps color information separated from each other in the cable and is the most important factor in producing sharp projected video.

Don't spend too much time with the projector's audio systems. They are barely useful to a round table of four or five people. Connect audio directly from DVD player or computer to a quality sound system.

Hope this information helps..
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Old March 27th, 2008, 09:40 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Waldemar Winkler View Post
No, I haven't used it, but I've used all kinds of projectors for video display for something just over 20 years.

I looked at the specs. You will be very pleased with this projector's performance. It has plenty of power for bright images, so long as you don't exceed a screen width of 10'.

What I didn't see (or missed) is the ability to mute the projector without turning it off. Usually a button on the projector's remote control, "muting" the video simply inserts a black "slide". The projected image is still there, just hidden from view until needed. With this feature you can actually start a presentation, pause it, and have it immediately available when you need it. No more paper cards in front of the projector lens, no more fumbling through OS menus to start the presentation. In any case, this is a very important user feature. Download the user manual and look for it.

Also look for keystone adjustment to plus or minus 30 degrees. A normal feature for most projectors.

The component to VGA adapter cable is a must. This allows you to connect the R/G/B primary color connections on a DVD player directly to the computer input. This keeps color information separated from each other in the cable and is the most important factor in producing sharp projected video.

Don't spend too much time with the projector's audio systems. They are barely useful to a round table of four or five people. Connect audio directly from DVD player or computer to a quality sound system.

Hope this information helps..

Wow, thanks for the awesome response. I did check the remote for the mute button, and they do have it, but they are calling it "blank screen". It is described as you described it though.

Doesn't have the component to VGA adapter cable, but I assume I can purchase one? I was contemplating on whether to run from my laptop or DVD player, and I'm not sure which will work best. I was going to play with it once I get the projector.

For the most part, I will be using either house sound or the DJ's equipment for sound. I have gotten approval from most DJ's already, but have a couple more to hear back from. So that'll help tremendously.

Thanks again for your help and I am happy to hear your opinion that it'll be a good one. Its kind of hard to tell, going into this with no real knowledge of projectors. :)
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Old March 28th, 2008, 02:53 AM   #4
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Dawn,
I prefer to use a DVD player instead of a laptop. The DVD player is more reliable to play the vid when you want it to without having to worry about screen savers kicking in or lag time during play back (causes pauses). Also, a DVD player has composite (or better) audio output that hooks into your sound system without having to do a conversion from the headphone jack of the laptop. And of course, the DVD player normally has a remote control that you can start and stop the player from the back or side so you don't have to position yourself close to the player. Hope this helps.
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Old March 28th, 2008, 10:44 AM   #5
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Visit http://cablesforless.com. I got my VGA/component cable there for less than $30.00, including shipping.

Another thing I neglected to mention. Insure the projector can switch between 4:3 and 16:9 aspect ratios. It probably will.

Audio connects to house sound will vary from place to place. Plan the logistics for audio connections well in advance and convert the outgoing signal from stereo to mono with a simple Y adapter. Hard wire connections are usually best, but usually demand you have long cable runs from playback device to sound system. Long RCA cables are expensive (see link above for better prices), and there may be some degradation in audio quality. That can be avoided by using XR cables, but then you have to address the issue of adapting RCA to XLR at the DVD player and then adapting XLR to either 1/4" or RCA at he sound system end.

An easier method would be to use your wireless mic system to carry the audio. No cables to run. No time wasted when you could be doing something more productive. Some wireless systems allow the transmitter to be set to mic, headset mic, or line input. Choose line. If your wireless system does not allow for input switching, you will need to get an adapter that changes the DVD player's audio out from line level to mic level. Place the receiver at the sound system and connect to an open channel, mic in or line in, whichever works.
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