Widescreen or Fullcreen? at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Wedding / Event Videography Techniques

Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old March 27th, 2008, 03:51 PM   #1
Tourist
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 4
Widescreen or Fullcreen?

I am filming a wedding this Saturday with two VX-2000's, and I am debating whether to do it in widecreen or fullscreen. I know that you take a resolution hit filming in the wide mode, but stylistically it looks so much better. What would everyones advice be? Should I film in wide mode, film in full mode then convert to wide in post, or should I just forget about widescreen with the vx2000 and save my pennies to upgrade to hd?
Matt Pothecary is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2008, 04:27 PM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Thunder Bay, ON. Canada
Posts: 374
Film in 4:3 and and the bars in post. That way you don't loose any resolution, just be sure that you compensate while your filming. This has been mentioned before and is a good medium.
Jason Bowers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2008, 05:57 PM   #3
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Apple Valley CA
Posts: 4,866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Bowers View Post
Film in 4:3 and and the bars in post. That way you don't loose any resolution, just be sure that you compensate while your filming. This has been mentioned before and is a good medium.
How exactly does that not "lose resolution", unless you're shooting with anamorphic lenses, something's got to give.

Matt - do a couple test shots and see how your camera handles "wide" shooting, see if it's acceptable or if you lose too much. I used my SD cams in wide mode all the time once I realized that framing worked better for most everything.
Dave Blackhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2008, 06:54 PM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Thunder Bay, ON. Canada
Posts: 374
When you turn on the 16:9 on the vx's it somehow stretches the image or distorts it somehow. I have not used it as I have read here that it does so. Many have suggested adding the bars in post. That is where I my perception comes from.
Jason Bowers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2008, 07:22 PM   #5
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Bowers View Post
Film in 4:3 and and the bars in post. That way you don't loose any resolution, just be sure that you compensate while your filming. This has been mentioned before and is a good medium.
I understand the notion of adding the bars in post, but I am left wondering how can you be sure about the framing, as I would be slightly different to take full advantage of the 16:9 dimensions.

Any thoughts or suggestions?

Ta,

marks
Mark Stavar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2008, 08:26 PM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Durango, Colorado, USA
Posts: 711
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Stavar View Post
I understand the notion of adding the bars in post, but I am left wondering how can you be sure about the framing, as I would be slightly different to take full advantage of the 16:9 dimensions.

Any thoughts or suggestions?

Ta,

marks
You can't really be sure about framing when shooting 16x9 with a camera that can only display 4x3. It is mostly a guess, but after a while you get used to the squished images in your viewfinder. The results are usually acceptable.

I've never liked "getting used to the squished horizontal viewfinder". I usually connect a 1394 cable to my laptop and feed the camera signal into iMovie pre-formatted for widescreen and use the display as a monitor. Framing is much easier.
__________________
Waldemar
Waldemar Winkler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2008, 08:27 PM   #7
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Saint Cloud, Florida
Posts: 1,043
on my VX2100 i taped the top and bottom bars (two slices of a business card) to 16:9 spec in the lcd. use the framing option in the menus.
__________________
www.facebook.com/projectspecto
Marco Wagner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 28th, 2008, 02:32 AM   #8
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 154
I have used the vx2000 and 2100 and for 3 years now and have been shooting in 16:9 exclusively.

If your entended audience is going to be a widescreen tv user, just render your movie out without the bars crap.

If your entended user is an analog tv, then you need to resize your image in post to fit the safe area margins. No loss in resolution or any of that crap.

If you want to export your video to the web, then you need to apply letterbox so it will look as though you were watching it on a widescreen tv.
Tom Sessions is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 28th, 2008, 02:53 AM   #9
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 154
One other thing...I use PP1.5 to capture the video...Matrox capture card. Make sure your capture settings are in widescreen mode and your project is set as a widescreen project. So, when you render out your movie, and then import the timeline into Encore, your final DVD will fill the widescreen and no cropping will occur on a widescreen tv.

This is a true widescreen presentation...no one on this planet can tell me otherwise.
Tom Sessions is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 28th, 2008, 12:40 PM   #10
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Belgium
Posts: 9,064
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Sessions View Post
This is a true widescreen presentation...no one on this planet can tell me otherwise.
Sure about that? ;)

I allways shoot 16:9 with my vx2100 and process it in post as 16:9, never had any problem with wide screen tv's, I just had a few 4:3 tv's (you hardly see those anymore in Europe, Belgium) but they displayed it in the correct aspect ratio with the horizontal black bars.

I wouldn't see any reason to shoot 4:3 with the camera adding black bars later, at least not for the image quality sake. 4:3 does give a bit sharper image (I did some 4:3 in the beginning of my career when a lot of people still had 4:3 tv's) and if I compare now I do see a minor difference, especially on big tv screens, but a client will hardly notice.

guessing were the black bars will go in post when shooting 4:3 seems like quite a risk to me but can imagine you'd get used to it, but I don't really see the advantage of it.
Noa Put is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 28th, 2008, 01:58 PM   #11
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Miami, FL
Posts: 2,933
With the GL2's it's easy. The GL2's have a setting for a 16x9 guide display, meaning you can shoot in 4x3 but you have onscreen guides showing you your 16x9 boundaries. In post, just add some black bars and render and you're done ... no resolution loss.
__________________
Black Label Films
www.blacklabelweddingfilms.com
Travis Cossel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 28th, 2008, 06:07 PM   #12
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Denver, Colorado USA
Posts: 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Sessions View Post
This is a true widescreen presentation...no one on this planet can tell me otherwise.
It sure looks like crap on a 32"+ LCD/Plasma to me. Will the bride care? Probably not.

Looks great on a regular CRT though.
Rick Steele is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2008, 12:32 AM   #13
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 154
I proof all of my work on a 50" plasma...no issues so far...just don't sit so damn close...I usually sit back about 10' ( reccomended distance). Granted, it ain't HD, but looks just fine.

I really hope to begin shooting in HD within the next year or so. Hopefully, Blueray burning issues and adobe software will get thier act together by then.
Tom Sessions is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2008, 12:15 PM   #14
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Denver, Colorado USA
Posts: 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Sessions View Post
I really hope to begin shooting in HD within the next year or so.
Don't know how much you've got invested in SD cams right now but I would think if you're satisfied with the SD 16:9 you could hold out longer than this. It's my feeling that most clients will soon complain more about the 4:3 ratio than they will the fact it's shot in SD. (Since most TV's bought today are widescreen).

In other words... I think native widescreen is a more compelling reason to upgrade to HDV than the enhanced resolution itself because of all the SD content still around. So if you're already getting spectacular 16:9 results with what you have, maybe just hang in there a bit longer. Others are upgrading to HDV and downconverting that footage to SD for delivery reasons and it does look better but again, if yours is fine...
Rick Steele is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2008, 02:14 PM   #15
Tourist
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Fredericton, Canada
Posts: 2
The great thing about shooting wide is being able to do over the shoulder close ups, this is great with vows ect.
Darren Odonnell is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Wedding / Event Videography Techniques

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:20 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network