Another Highlight at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Wedding / Event Videography Techniques

Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old November 25th, 2008, 01:31 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Posts: 196
Another Highlight

Please be brutally honest with me. It's the only way I will learn. I know some of the shots were shaky. The person I had working with me decided to do handheld instead of using the tripod I insisted and the shot of the bride walking down the aisle is dark and a couple of other shots. I need to purchase lights. So please critique away.


Michael and Brittany
Shaun Conner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 25th, 2008, 02:29 PM   #2
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Miami, FL
Posts: 2,933
I'm short on time today so I'm just going to list some things (so don't be offended my my "briefness").

- a shot near the beginning jerks away as it transitions to another shot .. adjust the clip so that you don't see the pull away from the shot

- try not to use shots where you are adjusting the exposure

- on the zoom out of the rings (I don't like zooms, but that's a personal thing) the camera is searching for focus and it doesn't look good .. either you were in auto focus or you were zoomed in too much for how close you were to the subject .. something to watch for

- just saw another shot where you start to pan away and the transition to the next shot starts .. you gotta hide those

- shot of bride and groom together at alter has the background in focus and not the B&G .. again, could be auto focus .. go manual

- I'm noticing a lot of your pans on the tripod are a bit "sticky" .. I would stop using those since they don't really look good, at least until you can get a better tripod .. instead, get the same shots but don't pan, just get a nice static shot and maybe get a close-up version so you can switch from one to the other during the edit

- on the handheld shots that are shaky, I would focus on getting a solid static shot of the subject first, then try the handheld shot .. if the handheld shot doesn't work out, don't use it or it will just bring the quality of your video down .. but at least you have a solid shot to work with and you got some additional handheld experience

- the chicken dance .. wear earplugs so you don't start hearing that in your dreams at night

- on the driving away shot you're shaky .. maybe next time shot that shot from the ground so you can get a different perspective and use the ground for extra support


Overall not to bad, though. Clever edit when you quickly cut between people during the family photos. I'm sure the couple will enjoy the video.
__________________
Black Label Films
www.blacklabelweddingfilms.com
Travis Cossel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 25th, 2008, 02:37 PM   #3
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Posts: 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travis Cossel View Post
I'm short on time today so I'm just going to list some things (so don't be offended my my "briefness").

- a shot near the beginning jerks away as it transitions to another shot .. adjust the clip so that you don't see the pull away from the shot

- try not to use shots where you are adjusting the exposure

- on the zoom out of the rings (I don't like zooms, but that's a personal thing) the camera is searching for focus and it doesn't look good .. either you were in auto focus or you were zoomed in too much for how close you were to the subject .. something to watch for

- just saw another shot where you start to pan away and the transition to the next shot starts .. you gotta hide those

- shot of bride and groom together at alter has the background in focus and not the B&G .. again, could be auto focus .. go manual

- I'm noticing a lot of your pans on the tripod are a bit "sticky" .. I would stop using those since they don't really look good, at least until you can get a better tripod .. instead, get the same shots but don't pan, just get a nice static shot and maybe get a close-up version so you can switch from one to the other during the edit

- on the handheld shots that are shaky, I would focus on getting a solid static shot of the subject first, then try the handheld shot .. if the handheld shot doesn't work out, don't use it or it will just bring the quality of your video down .. but at least you have a solid shot to work with and you got some additional handheld experience

- the chicken dance .. wear earplugs so you don't start hearing that in your dreams at night

- on the driving away shot you're shaky .. maybe next time shot that shot from the ground so you can get a different perspective and use the ground for extra support


Overall not to bad, though. Clever edit when you quickly cut between people during the family photos. I'm sure the couple will enjoy the video.
Thanks for the critique. I know I have a lot of work to do as far as for setting up and getting shots. I think my framing needs work. I still haven't mastered that yet.

Last edited by Shaun Conner; November 25th, 2008 at 03:42 PM.
Shaun Conner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 25th, 2008, 04:13 PM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Posts: 858
Without rehashing everything that has been already said (and please don't quote long segments, just refer to the title or author of the post instead).
I'd have to add a few stylistic comments:
You might want to consider taking out one of the song's choruses, so that you can take out some of the less-than-stellar shots. This should be your strongest shots, most emotional, highest impact...etc. Personally, the posed shots are a buzz-kill. They are best left to the still photographer. How about incorporating some natural sound (if it was good), vows, grand entrance announcement, a segment from a moving toast.
Don't forget to color match. The bride in the blue room, the recessional from above. Not much you can do when you don't have enough light though. Thats a real shame. I know some people may say that this is how it 'naturally' looked, but I need to see the faces. If you didn't have access to a light, you should have BEGGED, PLEADED or just plain ATTACKED the reception facilities manager to bring up the house lights, especially for the key moments. The lights can be turned off for the chicken dance ;-)
Brutal you want, brutal you got.
Oren Arieli is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 25th, 2008, 04:44 PM   #5
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Posts: 196
Oren I have no problem with someone telling me my work stinks or I need to change something to get a better outcome the problem starts when I believe I no longer need to hear it. As far as the lighting, I asked for more lighting at the church and reception, but I was told that the bride wanted to have a candlelit wedding and the lights low to create a certain mood. Since I don't have any lights I had to shoot it as is. I never thought about cutting the chorus. That sounds like a great idea. Thanks for the comments.
Shaun Conner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 25th, 2008, 05:41 PM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: London
Posts: 313
Hi Shaun,

I guess I agree with all the comments so far. Just keep making films and you will find with each one you will get better.

The cross dissolve bugs me the most! If you really must use them then keep an eye out for pans etc during the dissolve as it looks unprofessional. In fact try getting into a habit of using less dissolves! another thread here goes into more detail.

The only other problem I personally have, is that you will need to improve if you are to stand a chance of surviving long term in this industry.

At the moment this clip falls into the lame bracket for me(personal opinion) and I do think
you need to look at ways that your production will stand out from the crowd and make them choose you above your competition.

My honest thoughts.

Cheers.
John De Rienzo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2008, 08:38 AM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 789
Hi Shaun,

I really think you need to invest on lights. It's up to you to educate your client about lighting. I always light the reception ( speeches, cake cutting, bouquet throw) & use available lights during first dance to capture ambience ( especially when the DJ wants to showcase his lights). Try capturing the posed shots while they are preparing to pose otherwise it's just a photo opportunity as someone has mentioned earlier.

I like your video, you are better than some videographers I have seen.
Noel Lising is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2008, 10:27 AM   #8
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Posts: 196
Hi John. I understand exactly what you're saying. I was in that last thread about the cross dissolves which was discussed after I cut this. I plan on going back and redo this highlight with the suggestions you guys posed.

Hi Noel. Lights are the first thing on my to get list. When I walked into the venue I knew there would be problems. I was lucky enough that the first couple of weddings I shot had ample lighting and my luck ran out that night. Question about lighting, do you use on camera lighting or other lights?
Shaun Conner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2008, 10:46 AM   #9
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 789
Hi Shaun,

I know some videographers are not a fan of doing this but I usually light the reception with 2 Lowells , a sun gun and sometimes I shoot a light from behind for hair lights(podium). I have never gotten any complaints. Usually it's the DJs who are wary because they want to showcase their lights during the first dance (it's this part of the wedding where I shoot using available light).
Noel Lising is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Wedding / Event Videography Techniques

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:18 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network