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Old April 9th, 2009, 11:54 AM   #1
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Another Deposition question

First of all, I have done the search and pretty much read all of the threads, which is why I'm here now.

I'd like to hear what the requirements for the cameras in use are, and what are the preferred cameras to use.

A lot of the information on cameras seems to be quite dated.
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Old April 9th, 2009, 12:01 PM   #2
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Start here:

RED / Index

There are a LOT of questions to ask: what will this be used (primarily) for? What kind of budget? Tape or tapeless? Shoulder mounted or not? Does size matter? etc etc etc
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Old April 9th, 2009, 10:49 PM   #3
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Start here:

RED / Index

There are a LOT of questions to ask: what will this be used (primarily) for? What kind of budget? Tape or tapeless? Shoulder mounted or not? Does size matter? etc etc etc
Yes, agreed, a lot of questions. I currently still shoot my regular stuff with my VX2000's, but not depostions.

In the past it seems that the preferred cameras were vhs tape that record timestamps to tape. It seems that things have changed a lot. . . vhs is dead, timestamps (yes or no) etc, etc, etc. Trying to do camera searches online for depositions gets you everything except camera information.
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Old April 12th, 2009, 03:38 AM   #4
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Old April 12th, 2009, 08:57 AM   #5
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I have done research into going legal video work and really there are no certain requirements for cameras other than the quality be decent and they are able to imprint a date and time stamp as the deposition is being recorded.

You must be able to present an undedited version of the deposition and be able to pause or stop when directed by the legal team for breaks, off the record events, etc and of course to change your tape if you are using that media.

I have also read that you need to be able to present the court stenographer with an audio version of your recording which used to be done on cassette but I have read of people now just giving them an mp3 or WAV file of it, etc.

The setup I intend to put together will have independent of the camera a VHS / DVD combo recorder. The tricky thing there is that almost all of them will only record to VHS or DVD at one time, not both. VHS is pretty much dead but I wanted that capability as a backup media in case of a DVD issue and also in case I run accross an archaic country lawyer who wants that.

In my particular instance I have Sony V1U camcorders but really they are overkill for legal depositions as I don't think anybody is really looking for HD yet in that field.
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Old April 20th, 2009, 09:22 AM   #6
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Hi all, my first post in this forum. Cool site, btw.

Anyway, I'm considering branching out on my own in the video field (currently work within it, but more of an office/cublicle setting, not hands-on production), and an area of interest of mine would be Legal Deposition Video. I've done some research and come across this seminar for American Guild of Court Videographers, AGCV.com - American Guild of Court Videographers which looks like it's coming nearby in a few months.

Was wondering if anyone knew anything about this group or it's seminar or similar seminar. It seems expensive, but at the same time could be a crash course in deposition video, something I don't think I'd want to walk in on with no background or experience.


Also, does anyone know if the Canon XL1's do date/time stamps? I currently have a GL2 which doesn't, & will need to upgrade. I can post it in that section also, just figured I'd add it here.


Thanks all,
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Old April 22nd, 2009, 05:53 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by David Barnett View Post
Hi all, my first post in this forum. Cool site, btw.

Anyway, I'm considering branching out on my own in the video field (currently work within it, but more of an office/cublicle setting, not hands-on production), and an area of interest of mine would be Legal Deposition Video. I've done some research and come across this seminar for American Guild of Court Videographers, AGCV.com - American Guild of Court Videographers which looks like it's coming nearby in a few months.

Was wondering if anyone knew anything about this group or it's seminar or similar seminar. It seems expensive, but at the same time could be a crash course in deposition video, something I don't think I'd want to walk in on with no background or experience.


Also, does anyone know if the Canon XL1's do date/time stamps? I currently have a GL2 which doesn't, & will need to upgrade. I can post it in that section also, just figured I'd add it here.


Thanks all,
The XL1 will not time date stamp. The XL1s will time/date stamp. In the menu (can't remember which one right now) settings, look for "Character Record", and turn this feature on. Then, use the EVF DISPLAY button to turn off the EVF display info until only the date and time is visible.
The XL2 probably has a similar feature.

From what I have observed, a standard DV 4:3 is universally accepted. Indeed, my opinion is that aspect ratio suits the needs of legal video depositions better.

In so far as certification is concerned, base the value upon a market survey of what you can expect to earn from this line of work. In metropolitan areas certification as a legal videographer would likely carry a lot of weight as you seek job opportunities. In rural areas, it is pretty much worthless.

Most business referrals will come from certified Court Reporters or Court Reporting Firms, so cultivate a stable list of contacts. Large court reporting firms, i.e., corporate reporting firms, must be treated with suspicion. Never deal with a corporate reporting firm on any financial terms other than your own. My excrement list of corporate reporting firms one must not do business with is short, but is available upon request via private email. That said, make sure all legal firms that deal with civil suits are made aware of your services.
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