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Old May 15th, 2009, 03:27 PM   #1
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My client asked me if I have done these kind of weddings..

"Hello JJ,
Thanks for the info you provided! I saw you on Chicagostylewedding.com. Have you ever shot a Macedonian Orthodox wedding before.....or other Christian Orhodox wedding?
-George"

This is a direct quote from the e-mail.
I have done Catholic wedding and my religious background is Buddhist.
I also have done Hindu weddings. I know the difference between Christian and Catholic but beyond that, I am totally ignorant. I wikipedia the differences but not much about the actual weddings. I am going to tell him that I have done none of those, but I don't want to tell him I have no idea what those weddings are like.
I searched the forum but didn't return with lots of threads on either weddings.
Any short description or differences of those two?
As always, I really appreciate all the help from everyone here.
Thank you.

Best,

JJ
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Old May 15th, 2009, 04:09 PM   #2
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I did a quick Google search and found the following summary, but the real question here is your ability to sell yourself as a professional to the client. Since they specifically asked you whether you've done such a wedding before you need to answer that honestly, but then proceed to explain how your abilities will enable you to handle the situation if they'll just give you some information on what's unique about their wedding. You might also offer to attend the rehearsal to get a clearer picture of what to expect, and to plan out camera and microphone placement.

"Svadba
On the wedding day the bride is taken from her home by the "bride's guard", accompanied by a band or orchestra. They drink a toast to the bride and groom and the couple are allowed to see each other briefly, as the toast is drunk. They all leave for the church and the band plays a traditional song on the way. In the church the wedding party marches to the altar, accompanied by choir music, and there they go through a brief betrothal ceremony in which the bride and groom are given their rings. The wedding party then marshes to the center of the church, where there is a table bearing the Bible, a cross, a cup or wine and two crowns. The priest gives the instructive sermon, asking the participants specific questions pertaining to their free wills. Then, the priest ties the right hands or the participants together, symbolizing the one-ness or the marriage. Next, the crowns are placed on their heads, representing the coronation of glory with which the husband and wife hope to be blessed with in their future lives. After this, the formula of the wedding is pronounced as the priest says, three times, "Oh Lord, our God, crown them with glory and honor." There is then a reading or the gospel and the bride and groom are given the cup of blessed wine symbolizing the mutual life in which they will accept the good with the bad, the bitter with the sweet, together in blessed love and understanding. Finally, the wedding party, preceded by the priest, walks three times around the table, signifying the eternal path of marriage. The newlyweds are congratulated by friends and, on the way out or the church, the best man (kum) throws cions in the couple's path, to wish them good luck and prosperity. Then, the wedding party goes to the bride's home, or some other suitable place to celebrate. There the guests dance the oro, toast the bride and groom, and (instead of presents) give money to the honored couple. This is done to give the couple good start (financially) on their new life. Later on the bride is taken to the home or the groom to meet the small children, whom she kisses three times. This symbolizes the bride's desire for children of her own. The bride's mother-in-law' gives her wine and bread to symbolize the wish for harmony and happiness between them. "
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Old May 15th, 2009, 04:15 PM   #3
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so you are buddhist

so j.j you are buddhist?? you comment on my video but haven't reply to it yet heheh i'll will reply anyway i'm buddhist but i never shot buddhist wedding they all catholic that i been shot and i have 4 more coming up and guess what heheh it catholic. anyway i'm vietnamese i'm looking to learn more from you and anyone else in this super board thank you.
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Old May 15th, 2009, 04:27 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thanh Nguyen View Post
so j.j you are buddhist?? you comment on my video but haven't reply to it yet heheh i'll will reply anyway i'm buddhist but i never shot buddhist wedding they all catholic that i been shot and i have 4 more coming up and guess what heheh it catholic. anyway i'm vietnamese i'm looking to learn more from you and anyone else in this super board thank you.
Thanks, Thanh.
I don't think there is any Buddhist wedding... maybe Traditional Korean, Japanese and Chinese wedding, but I have never heard "the Buddhist Wedding" per se.
Good luck with your career and this board is awesome. You can learn a lot from here.
And please, use period when you finish the sentence. English is my 2nd language as well and it makes so much harder to understand when there is no period in your paragraph.
Thank you.
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Old May 15th, 2009, 05:04 PM   #5
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if the Macadonian wedding is like an Orthodox Greek wedding, it's actually one of the easier weddings to do. While the service can be and typically is a bit longer than a CAtholic mass ceremony at the Greek weddings I've done at 2 or 3 different Greek Churchs I have been able to 1) not only place a camera on the altar but stand there and operate it and 2) the couple never says anything the priest does ALL the talking but I mic the groom anyway and basically use him as a mic stand to pick up the priest. Typically I stand on the left side (ladies side) behind the bridesmaids and set the camera pretty high. Also if it's like a Greek wedding, they are led around the table up front by the priest a number of times so you need to get that. I also place a camera at the rear to fire to the altar on a wider shot and I'm hidden behind the girls so you don't see me. Other than that it's pretty much like a Catholic wedding.
Ask the couple if it's like a Greek ceremony and i it is you'll find it's not to bad to shoot.
Of course I could be all wrong too. ;-)
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Don
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Old May 16th, 2009, 01:48 AM   #6
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Just shot the Greek one last weekend so I can add few more details to Don's post. The wedding lasted about 45 min. Bride and groom stand all the time in front of the altar facing the sanctuary, away from the congregation. Bridesmaids on the left, groomsmen on the right in semicircle facing the congregation. The priest moves around between the couple and the sanctuary. Our main shooter was positioned on the left between the bridesmaids and the altar facing the couple. The maid of Honor and the best man have performed few special ceremonies: changing back and forth the wedding rings between the bride and the groom (trying to find the proper fit) and switching the crowns in similar fashion. Almost at the end priest leads the couple hooked by the arms few times around the altar. The priest does everything, no other readers, etc. Apart from one or two priest's visit to the inner sanctuary and the procession around the altar, everything else happens in one spot.
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Old May 16th, 2009, 01:32 PM   #7
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Thank you all so much for the comments.
I have e-mailed the client telling him that I haven't done any Orthodox wedding but I am willing to attend the rehearsal at my time. I also told him I did the same thing with my first Hindu wedding client and they were happy with the outcome, so we will see.
Thank you again, guys.

JJ
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Old May 16th, 2009, 02:02 PM   #8
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Also be aware that in a Greek wedding the bride meets the groom at the entrance of the
church and the Priest walks the Bride and Groom down the aisle.

At the end of the ceremony, the Priest again walks the Bride and Groom to the entrance of
the church, where he leaves the B&G to be congratulated by the guests as they leave the
church.
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Old May 18th, 2009, 10:37 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J.J. Kim View Post
I know the difference between Christian and Catholic
Don't ever say that out loud to a Catholic. Catholic *is* Christian. To imply there is a difference would be a big insult. I think you meant to say you know the difference between Protestant and Catholic. There are three main divisions of Christianity - Roman Catholic, Protestant and Eastern Orthodox, but they are all under the umbrella of "Christian".

I'd just hate to have you tell a prospect, "I've shot a Catholic wedding, but I've never shot a Christian wedding...click". :)
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Old May 18th, 2009, 10:42 AM   #10
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Sorry, Chris, or anyone if I have offended anyone.
I did pushed "click" to my client, and he told me if I attend their rehearsal for free, they would hire me, so I guess they weren't offended in anyway (thank God).
Thank you all again for the input. I have learned a lot!

JJ
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Old May 21st, 2009, 11:04 PM   #11
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Congratulations on persuading your client to hire you. For the benefit of anyone seeking to learn from your experience, can I offer a different perspective?

Whilst knowing the format of a ceremony is a great help (and you're right to research it) we all know no two weddings are identical.

In your situation we'd explain that we're professional programme makers, used to dealing with different and unexpected circumstances and our demo shows the quality of our work. Apart from emphasising that we respect the environment and dignity of the client's chosen ceremony and don't treat the venue like a studio, we'd avoid the issue of the precise faith of the wedding.

Your willingness to attend the rehearsals and make your final dispositions, eg microphone placement, camera eyelines etc after that shows you're a pro and as a pro I'm sure the precise faith/venue is actually the least of your concerns.

But well done anyway!
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Old May 22nd, 2009, 01:14 AM   #12
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JJ,

The ceremony for a Macedonian wedding is very similiar to a Greek Orthodox as mentioned, but the real difference is what happens before then.

Be clear on what they want captured because this can in some ways be far more important than the actual wedding ceremony - more for the parents anyway. If she is Macedonian, guests will arrive bearing presents, then there will be dancing while she (bride) is getting ready, then there is a meal but before the meal, the Father of the Bride may make a short welcome speech...very important thing and if you miss it, you may be in strife (been there). After that, the bride comes down and will give out presents to certain people and may do a pinning of flowers (depending on the family tradions). She then will leave the home but before hand, will kick a glass out the door (Greek brides may also throw salt over shoulder) before going out and doing some more dancing and then finally leave for the church.

For the Groom, there is dancing in the morning as people bring presents, there may be a shaving where significant family members do this, then there is the presents and flowers if applicable, kicking of the glass and then the final leaving.

It would be wise to find out what she wants filmed as in Aust, some Macedonian couples want every second of this. This part can be far more strenuous than the actual ceremony. Make sure you are clear if both sides of the family are Macedonian as you may need 2 people for the morning. Similiarly for the reception, all dancing may be what she want...and perhaps with a bit of creativity...

Hope this may help.

Last edited by Dean Morris; May 22nd, 2009 at 02:03 AM.
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