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Old July 11th, 2009, 03:25 AM   #1
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cheap stabilizer for hand held 5D

Hi guys,

what do you think of these cheapo ones?

are they ok you think for the 5D? I'm just worried that I won't be able to jam my eyes to the hoodloupe of the 5D with these things.

I'm just looking for something simple, light easy to put down and rig up. I've had a look at cinevate, red rock, zacuto and stuff.. beautiful babies.. but I can't afford to throw in another few thousand bucks on the rig at the moment.. plus I'm not shooting 5D exclusively just yet.

just looking for something cheap and nice to add in the goodie bag.

I think the most important thing is to have something that can rest on your body. that way you will reduce the shakyness. I've bought the hoodloupe from hoodman separately anyway, so I can sort of lean the camera into my eye somehow which adds stability.

The only problem now is whether these ebay items can put the camera close enough to my eye.

Please bear in mind that I've looked at some shoulder mount rig that rest the camera on your shoulder kinda thing. I think it won't really make a big difference to the stability. I think you'd need something around your chest area to be able to jam it against your body. but then again, i might be wrong.

Stedi-Stock Camcorder Shoulder Brace Stabilizer NEW USA - eBay, Other, Tripods Supports, Cameras Photo. (end time 12-Jul-09 07:24:54 AEST)

Camcorder Shoulder support/stand/stabilizer/FX1,GL1,GL2 - eBay, Tripods, Camcorder Accessories, Cameras Photo. (end time 13-Jul-09 14:15:01 AEST)

i'm attaching pictures in case the auction ends.


Santo
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Old July 11th, 2009, 01:59 PM   #2
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A couple observations, never tried the steadi-stock, but I'm familiar with the other design.

The steady stock is going to probably put the camera offset to your right - not a good plan, though I suppose you coud rig an offset bracket of some sort.

The other rig will work, it's very flexible with two diffrent risers which can swing in an arc - should be able to align with a little fiddling. BUT, be aware that if you're shooting video, that chest support will tend to "breathe" - it's actually far enough down towards your belly that it becomes hard not to transmit chest/belly movement. Otherwise it's a good rig.

Personally, I'd suggest taking a look at the tiffen Steady-stick (under $100) - I find that a belt support works better - the Steady Stick has a sort of shoulder extension, but it's articulated, so you can move things around as needed. Sunpak makes a compact monopod with a belt hook and lanyard that might help too - I've got a couple in my "support" collection, and they aren't bad.

I also have other compact monopods, a couple plastic clip on belt sockets the monopods drop in to, and a couple shoulder rigs which also can be attaced to the monopods... Primarily for small video cameras which really need the stabilization, but I've also experimented mounting a DSLR on the rigs as one of these days I hope for a Sony Alpha with video (a rep I spoke with said hang on a few more weeks... I hope he's right).

IMO, a belt support type setup is the best all around for cheap, and if you need more, some form of shoulder stock with TWO handles so you can control "roll" is about as good as it gets without going to a floating/gimballed rig.

With a DSLR you'd have one point of contact with the eyeloupe/hood, your hand provides a second contact point, adding a belt/upright support would provide a relatively stable third.

HTH's a bit.
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Old July 13th, 2009, 05:02 PM   #3
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I got one of these Steady Stock to play with. I wasn't very happy with my 5D2 and small lens (primes). Of course it can't support big zoom lenses. I find holding the camera stretched away from you with a nice padded neck strap to be more "steady" and comfortable. If you need support, than you may use a monopod for stationary shots, but the neck strap seems to work best when moving around with small lens.

Too much of shaky video with this steady stock.

As suggested I waist strap on which I can place the monopod, and neck strap would be fit best fit for support and moving shots.

Do you guys know any Waist Strap with pocket to hold monopod? I need a waist band to hold my lenses anyway.
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Old July 13th, 2009, 05:15 PM   #4
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Ramesh -
I've got a couple of M-Rock belts - they have a zippered pocket that works OK in a pinch, or I've got these tool holders (BiggLugg II) that have a socket that clips over belt or pants, seem to be the ticket for most every monopod I've got, and pretty stable compared to a cloth pocket. Don't know if M-Rock still makes the belts, I've got a couple spares if you wanted to PM me...

I've found I can't use a fully extended monopod for beans - somehow I wobble too much, but the shorter belt mounted pod, either with or without a shoulder/handles rig seems to work. A stretch strap as you've noted also works pretty well, but would be a bit long if one is using a DSLR-V with a loupe, as seems to be the optimum.
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Old July 13th, 2009, 07:30 PM   #5
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Hi guys,

Thanks for the comments!

Dave: I've actually got the steadystick. But I never liked it. I bought dv multirig and never looked back. It has now become my tripod replacement during ceremony. But I might try the steadystick with the 5d now. It might work because I'm not planning to pan a lot with the 5d.

ramesh: I've got lowepro belts that I've bought from B&H. you might wanna check it out.

I agree, I think steadistock wouldn't do a good job. I tried using the multirig with my 5D WITHOUT the stick. it was actually quiet heavy over time when you focus pull and stuff. I don't really get how zacuto rig can get away with the weight. Cause from what I have experienced, you would still need the stick with belt holster to be able to shoot conveniently.

Santo
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Old July 13th, 2009, 07:46 PM   #6
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I think the MultiRig Pro really is what you need for this. You can mount to a rail, or to the big Lens mount. You can control rocking some, but it also provides a handy place to attach your mic or wireless receiver (lapels).
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Old July 14th, 2009, 01:35 AM   #7
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The MultiRig is probably the "best" ready made solution, my suggestions were budgetary based... My rigs aren't much different from the MultiRig, but are "homebrew" aglomerations of parts.

One fly in the ointment for a DSLR-V is getting the alignment right if using one of the eyepieces - the camera must be offset from a typical shoulder mounted position, and relatively close to the face. That's why I was thinking the Steady Stick - it can be positioned by moving the belt around. Maybe try removing the shoulder attachment entirely, and adding a stretch strap to the upright - it helps add control to the rig, and you can move it up and down the shaft to adjust things a bit. The eyepiece would provide the third contact point and the design of the SS should control "roll" at least.
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Old July 14th, 2009, 10:39 AM   #8
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Just used the MultiRig Pro on a 5D shoot this week, I felt it worked very well.
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