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Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


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Old August 23rd, 2002, 07:36 PM   #1
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Shooting a wedding with XL1S - Frame or Normal Mode?

Hi -
I just purchased an XL1S a few days ago. As a favor for a friend I am shooting their wedding video tomorrow. I have entensive shooting experience but not with this cam.
I obviously don't have much time to test.

For any of you that shoot weddings(or anything) what do you think would be a better mode to shoot in, frame or normal mode. Or are different parts of the wedding better shot in diferent modes?

Thanks in advance for any help.
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Old August 23rd, 2002, 08:01 PM   #2
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It's really personal preference -- if possible, let the bride/groom see a sample of each. If you're doing a lot of pans, frame mode will show the movement more than normal mode, but I don't mind the effect. I shoot very little in normal mode.
Different strokes.....
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Old August 23rd, 2002, 08:06 PM   #3
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Hi Vic -

Thanks - Unfortunately I am shooting the wedding tomorrow morning so there is no time to show them each mode or do any extensive testing..

To be quite honest in the minimal testing I have done, I can't see that much of a difference.
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Old August 23rd, 2002, 09:14 PM   #4
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Everyone here has their own preference, but all preferences are developed over time through experience. In my opinion, your safest bet considering the limited time available is to shoot in normal (interlaced) movie mode. Hope this helps,
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Old August 24th, 2002, 01:00 AM   #5
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Ditto what Chris said. Stick with normal mode and you'll be safe.
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Old August 24th, 2002, 04:17 AM   #6
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I suggested exactly what Chris suggested at DV.com's camera forum. Shoot interlaced to be safe. During your spare time, get to know your XL1 by reading the manual, playing with the cam, and doing footage tests. Once you are a master of your cam, you'll be able to use the cam more skillfully and creatively. For some things, progressive is the better way to go. But first find out what these "some things" are. Personally, I like using progressive, for certain things. Interlaced looks more "normal," however.

I've only used the XL1 a few times. Like with any cam, it takes time to get to know it. Perhaps use its auto mode. That's what I did, and the footage came out just fine.
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Old August 25th, 2002, 12:55 PM   #7
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Thanks for the tips..

I shot the wedding mostly in interlaced mode. I shot the first dance and them leaving in horse drawn carriage in frame mode. Eveything turned out great..

I do now see the difference between the modes clearly..

One question. When shooting backlit subjects what can be done. The cake cutting was in a corner with two huge windows and BRIGHT sunlight coming in directly. Of course the couple looks super dark.. I will try to fix in After Effects..
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Old August 25th, 2002, 05:45 PM   #8
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In no particular order:

1. Move the Cake
2. Close the windows
3. Move in very close and use a wide angle lens
4. Use the expose compensation dial - probably +2EV, background is blown out but you can see their faces.
5. Shoot from the side, losing only half a face might be better
6. Shooting from a high or low angle may get most of the window out of the shot.
7. Have a couple of guest stand in front of window to block some of the light
8. Turn up all the room lights and open window, even use on camera light, to reduce the extreme contrast range
9. Fix it in post
10.Wait until dark to shot it.

Jeff
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Old August 27th, 2002, 07:29 PM   #9
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This is what I do at all my weddings. Regular mode for all "reality type footage" Ceremony, post ceremony, pre reception, reception speeches. Then I use Frame mode for those "creative, fun" scenes. Photo shoot, first dance, dancing, garter, boquet, etc. To me the "Frame mode" has that "movie" fiction or documentary look. The "regular mode" has that "reality, live" look!
It's a "feeling look" to me. Anyway...back and forth during a wedding is pretty cool to watch.
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Old August 27th, 2002, 07:38 PM   #10
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Unfortunately at a wedding it's hard to just walk up and move the cake and table around. Closing blinds behind if possible or using a video light to compensate. Turning up the AE shift will work but unfortunately the background will be brighter as well. But seeing the couples faces is important. I did an outdoor wedding and as the couple left to walk down the September, late afternoon sun was facing my camera straight on! Lens flare hell! I had to do some creative editing latter! I never saw it coming until it was too late!
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Old August 27th, 2002, 10:12 PM   #11
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There are a ton of threads on this subject, but I would do what the KennelMaster Chris says and stick to interlace. When you have time you may want to experiment with it.

One other tip with frame mode, when shooting on a tripod do not forget to turn off the image stabilizer (OIS). It is so easy to forget and only aggravates jerkiness in pans.
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Old August 27th, 2002, 10:24 PM   #12
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Adam,

You might want to remove your UV, protection filter. This post may be of interest to you as a wedding videographer http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/showthread.php?s=&threadid=3299 Although I can understand wanting to keep a filter on at the reception. I do a lot of outdoor work, hawks in flight and such. Rarely do I have problems with flare. But I almost never use a filter either.

Jeff
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Old August 27th, 2002, 11:12 PM   #13
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Yes, I have my filters always on!
I'm scared to take them off! Once I scratch my lens...that's it!
But I will try it!
Didn't Chris tell us all to keep the filter on??
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Old August 28th, 2002, 04:47 AM   #14
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Forget about what "Chris says" and take a look for yourself. Do what you think is right. Always take anything I say with a grain of salt, and listen to the community at large, and most importantly, listen to yourself. My advice might be bullshit for your particular situation. Find out for yourself.
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Old August 28th, 2002, 05:34 PM   #15
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I was just being funny Chris :) Keeping a protective filter on is good advice still! I've just forgot about it all these years.

Anyway it does make sense though that any piece of glass added over top of the lens will probably cause problems when there is various light sources. I wonder if most pro "movie/film makers keep added lens off (other than ones for correction or effect)? I was scared before but what the hell! Nothing never really ever touches my lens anyway!

What's a really good quality lens cleaning material??
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