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Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


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Old November 23rd, 2004, 03:23 PM   #1
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Wedding Day Equipment List?

I am relatively new to wedding videography myself and Im wondering what other people bring with them to shoot a wedding as far as video is concerned?

Lighting and audio options aside, what video equipment do most people bring when trying to take a more artistic approach to the video?

Obviously a good camcorder, usually 1-2 extra cameras. Quality tripods are essential I would assume.

But what about cranes or jibs, monopods vs stabilization devices (glidecam or flowpod), anybody ever bring a green screen or anything different?

Im looking into several possibilities and it owuld be great to hear what responses from the crowd as well as what results you have gotten from various equipment that you bring.

Thanks everybody.
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Old November 23rd, 2004, 03:40 PM   #2
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We always bring 4 cameras, even if we sold it as 2 cameras. We like to have backup equipment and the more footage the better the video.

For each camera man, we have a tripod, mono-pod and a varizoom stabiliztion unit. Although, most of don't use the stabilizer, depends on the surrondings and time at the shoot.

We bring a green and blue screen, it can be used as both. We shoot about 4 or 5 shots with the screen. It's easy to set up right after the photographers shoots a shot, we slip in and add the screen. Sometimes the photographer is a complete, a$$ and we have to redo the shots.

Make sure you have a back-up wireless audio, just in-case, yours is on the same channel as the churches. We ran into that for the first time last weekend, but I was good because we had a backup.

We are relatively new as well and we learn so much each time we go to a new event. We have done about 40 weddings in the past 2 years. Take it slow, editing is very time consuming and If this isn't your day job you will get burnt out, quick.

I am testing a remote tripod, so that we can get those tuff shots when the church will not allow you behind the officiant and the B&G. I hope it works as good as I think it will.

Good luck.

Jon East
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Old November 23rd, 2004, 05:09 PM   #3
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Thanks Jon

I was actually reading your other post about the powerpod and it sounds like an interesting setup. It will be great to see how it comes out.

Do you have any clips online and/or a website I can check out if you don't mind.

Thaks for the reply I would love to see what you have done with the blue/green screen.

Patrick
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Old November 23rd, 2004, 06:22 PM   #4
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I'm in the process of getting a new webserver, my last one crashed. As soon as I get it online I will post a green screen edit. We use software called Ultra by Serious Magic. It works really well at chroma keying. I had used Vegas Video in the past
and it take too much time in comparison.

I will post video hopefully by this weekend. I am very interested in the remote camera idea. If the two cheap versions of the remote camera don't work I am going to design one myself.

Thanks,

Jon
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Old November 23rd, 2004, 10:42 PM   #5
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Patrick,

One item that has proved invaluable to me is the DVRig Pro. I can only compare it to my Bogen monopod as far as stabilization products. It allows for far more flexibility in getting shots than the monopod as is especially useful shooting pre-ceremony and reception shots.
Good tripods are a must. Backups for everything, more batteries and tapes than you think you'll need... this list goes on and on. Don't overlook little items like gaffer tape and a head cleaning tape... often times these items are forgotten as we concentrate on backup cams, mics...etc.
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Old January 2nd, 2005, 08:52 PM   #6
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The day before, sometimes two, I start getting everything together. Counting tapes, labeling, changing batteries in all of the sound equipment and lastly I set everything by the back door.

So far it has worked out very well. . . except for the two times I forgot the tripods. Scary feeling taking your cameras out of their cases and standing there looking for somewhere to put them.
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Old January 3rd, 2005, 05:40 AM   #7
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I have toyed with remotely operated cameras myself.
I found that a little ingenuity and some parts from a hobby store(a REAL hobby store...not those arts and crafts emporiums) can make getting unique shots with the realm(buget) of us mortals. I picked up a cheaper R/C car radio setup. It came with a pistol grip radio, 2 servos, transmitter, and battery. If you wanted to be really remote, there are wireless RX/TX combos out there for video as well. Using a hi-res bullet camera...I created a rig for on-board video on R/C helicopters. Nothing can replace an arial shot to make a video look high budget.
The trigger pushed forward tilts the camera up, pulling the trigger back tilts the camera down. Nuetral trigger puts the camera dead center. The steering wheel contols the pan. You can get good with this setup very easily...and like I said...its cheap. High power servos are available if you were to want to try normal sized cameras...but for around $125, a 480 line lipstick camera does a superb job of capturing quality footage. It mounts easily to about anything...so a broomstick boom would probably set you back $5. One of those telescoping lightbulb changing rods would be even better.
These are pretty much guerilla videography techniques...but who needs to spend extra loot to say they have name brand cobra cranes or mega mounts?
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