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Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


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Old May 11th, 2005, 12:10 PM   #1
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How much slo-mo?

I'm curious how much slo-mo each of you use in your wedding edits. I just purchased and watched the Von Lanken's "Breaking Out of the Box" DVD and LOVED the techniques, however, since I didn't see a complete wedding, just certain parts, it left me wondering how much is too much (or too little). I also know the answer will vary depending on what the couple wants, but I'm looking for a general answer based on the average.

Personally, I love the slo-mo, and was really inspired by the Von Lanken's on this, but I just don't want to overdo it.

Also, how many of you use outtakes or deleted scenes in the finished DVD? I'm not sure i've made up my mind whether this takes away from the rest of my product or adds enjoyment to it. Since I'm just getting started I don't have a lot of customer feedback on this yet.

Thanks
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Old May 11th, 2005, 01:21 PM   #2
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In my own work I only use an effect, slo-mo, B&W or whatever, when it fits.
In other words, just because I have the ability to do it doesn't mean I have to.

To me, its about the "feel" of the piece. It has to make sense and feel right, so in answer to your question, I don't think there is an average or specific answer.

Just my $.03 worth (adjusted for inflation)

Don
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Old May 11th, 2005, 02:32 PM   #3
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outtakes & deleted scenes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Wood
Hhow many of you use outtakes or deleted scenes in the finished DVD? I'm not sure i've made up my mind whether this takes away from the rest of my product or adds enjoyment to it. Since I'm just getting started I don't have a lot of customer feedback on this yet.
I can't figure out why, but I've recently had several clients ask for raw footage -- one a full year after the wedding! I don't currently offer raw footage, but when someone asks, I sell them "watermarked" copy of their original footage. It's happened twice in two years of business. I MAY, however, start including watermaked raw footage on separate discs. Not only does it show the hard work that went into making an entertaining edited short-form wedding movie, but it's an easy way to jack up package prices a little. If so many people in my market want it, why not include it as a "value added" feature?

TJB
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Old May 11th, 2005, 03:01 PM   #4
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I personally don't use any slow motion in my video. I find it boring. We have developed a style that is faster paced even when cutting to more dramatic music. That way you can use audio too. Which is a VERY important component. I think that too much slow motion can look like a photo slideshow and they don't need that. They already have pictures of their wedding. Plus it's hard to slow down video and make it technically look good. I do shoot slow motion in my super 8 though. Sparingly.

http://www.lumierebridal.com/video/e...aham_large.mov
http://www.lumierebridal.com/video/m...&davelarge.mov
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Old May 12th, 2005, 12:26 PM   #5
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If the entire production is one slow-mo after another - what's the challenge in that? Anyone can throw together one slow mo after another, after another, after another. Depending on the NLE your using, you likely have hundreds of creative tools at your disposal. My opinion, is that slow motion best impacts the viewer when they see some real-time video as a reference.
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Old May 12th, 2005, 03:54 PM   #6
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i don't know what you guys call slow mo, but I use it very offen to mask reframing (one camera work). I'm panning, for example, very fast (like half second) withthe camcorder to frame someone else and then just slow down maybe 10 seconds of video to cover that half second. I'm carefull to have one of the 2 parts with nothing to show synchronization problems. :)
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Old May 12th, 2005, 04:49 PM   #7
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Cosmin,
I agree thats a great useage of slo-mo but I think what Brandon is asking about is more of the highlight, vignette, recap packages and the use of slo-motion in them. Like I said before, if its appropriate to set the mood of the particular shot use it, if it doesn't add to the overall feel of the shot, don't use it.

Don
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Old May 12th, 2005, 05:22 PM   #8
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Yes, you're right Don - even though I am enjoying reading what others also use the slo-mo for. I enjoyed Johnathan's clips immensely with the 8mm without any slo-mo; but I still have not heard anyone say on average (or percentage) of the 4 or 5 parts of the DVD, how much slo-mo is the norm. Even with Mark and Trish's DVD, I'm just seeing sections of a wedding and not the whole thing - in fact everything I've seen from the forum and other sources is just parts of the whole, so its hard to judge the "how much" question.

Even a conservative estimate from some of you old pros would be great. You guys know from years of experience what really works.
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Old May 12th, 2005, 07:03 PM   #9
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Great job, Craig~ (oops... I mean Jonathan :)) Thanks for posting your work.

Last edited by Young Lee; May 13th, 2005 at 01:18 AM.
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Old May 13th, 2005, 12:59 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Wood
Even a conservative estimate from some of you old pros would be great. You guys know from years of experience what really works.
I don't mean this as an offence to anyone. However, trends change horribly fast. What was great 5 or 10 years ago is seen as cheesy today (direct quotes from my brides). I would not worry so much about others opinions as much as what you feel works for you. I know that is cliché but it's very true. You also have to remember that the brides of today are used to seeing a certain style of cutting in the media/movies. (Please understand I am from a relatively progressive part of the United States, I’m not making a blanket statement for the whole world) If you feel like you are putting yourself to sleep, too much slow motion. Personally, (I've stated it before) the brides that like our style don't want any slow motion at all. I know I'm not the norm. Personally, I would error on the side of less is more. Why not focus on getting the audio of people greeting each other. That is what I have found is cherished by my brides.
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