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Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


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Old May 13th, 2005, 08:24 PM   #1
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A Getting Ready piece to share

http://home.comcast.net/~g.elliott3/...reCeremony.wmv
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Old May 13th, 2005, 09:26 PM   #2
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really nice, i like the slow motion and your choice of shots used (hands buttoning the shirt sleeve, inside overhead with the ceiling fan coming into frame, the angle on the outside shot of the church, etc...). overall, i dug the whole thing, music and all.

i'm going into my 3rd wedding shoot tomorrow, and i can't wait. after i edit down this wedding i'm gonna post some clips up for critique. and i have to say that this forum has been a definate asset, as i cut to it for information everyday.

keep on keeping on,
stowell...
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Old May 14th, 2005, 02:05 PM   #3
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Excellent as always, Glen. Nice VO, BTW.
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Old May 14th, 2005, 04:55 PM   #4
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Very Nice

Very Nice Work!

I recently purchased not only The Art of Moving Camera Techniques by Mark and Trisha Von Lanken (sp?), but their entire set.

Glen you must practice the techniques alot! Your moving camera shots are incredible! That, and I'm sure there is just an abundance of natural talent at work with the camera in your hands. As soon as I figure out what is wrong with one of my new DVX100a's I've got to start working on these moving camera techniques. They add so much.

How often do you use the GlideCam?

Incredible Work!

-Matt-
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Old May 14th, 2005, 05:57 PM   #5
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Thanks for sharing here Glenn -- awesome as usual!!

-Michael
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Old May 14th, 2005, 06:21 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Trubac
Very Nice Work!

I recently purchased not only The Art of Moving Camera Techniques by Mark and Trisha Von Lanken (sp?), but their entire set.

Glen you must practice the techniques alot! Your moving camera shots are incredible! That, and I'm sure there is just an abundance of natural talent at work with the camera in your hands. As soon as I figure out what is wrong with one of my new DVX100a's I've got to start working on these moving camera techniques. They add so much.

How often do you use the GlideCam?

Incredible Work!

-Matt-
Yes when I'm in season I'll actually practice at least two nights a week. I definitly feel it's a skill that has to be practiced and can be improved upon.

This season I'm going to be using the glidecam a great deal more. This piece has 1 glidecam shot can you figure out which one?
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Old May 14th, 2005, 08:46 PM   #7
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A Guess

Glen,

I'm going to guess the glidecam is the shot when you are coming around the grooms shoulder/side while he is standing in front of the window. It's just a guess.

I like your editing... No matter how hard I try to focus on the technical details I keep getting drawn towards just watching and thinking this is good. There is one edit that seems a little abrupt to me. The cut from the bride sitting I believe, with a group of people around her to the extreme low angle shot of the lamp post and the exterior of the church.

The cut goes with the music... I just feel like something else is needed before it to transition to both the exterior, and such a drastic low angle. Just an idea. Other than that... your stuff is awesome.

Matt
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Old May 14th, 2005, 09:08 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Trubac
Glen,

I'm going to guess the glidecam is the shot when you are coming around the grooms shoulder/side while he is standing in front of the window. It's just a guess.
Matt
We have a winner!!!!
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Old May 16th, 2005, 05:42 AM   #9
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once again mate, a lovely piece.. the music choice.. when listening back , reminds me of the Terminator :)

I particuarly like the not so soft focus look to the piece.. soft focus is so overused, but in here, it actually fits nicely :)

oh and the creme de la creme, would have to be the transitional pieces between scenes... blending one element form the first cut to a simialr block in the second.. very clever
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Old May 16th, 2005, 01:20 PM   #10
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Nice!

Glenn,

Thank you for posting that inspring clip. Although I'm not crazy about the music, your editing and speed of camera movement flowed very well with it and kept pace nicely. Great close-up shots throughout. You linger just long enough.

Question: How did you get the window lighting to flare up during that balcony shot inside the church? That was cool. I noticed you did that in a few other shots, such as the transition when the groom's standing near a bright window. It's not a traditional fade-to-white, but a directional flash. Very interesting.

T.J.
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Old May 16th, 2005, 02:29 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Borek
Glenn,

Thank you for posting that inspring clip. Although I'm not crazy about the music, your editing and speed of camera movement flowed very well with it and kept pace nicely. Great close-up shots throughout. You linger just long enough.

Question: How did you get the window lighting to flare up during that balcony shot inside the church? That was cool. I noticed you did that in a few other shots, such as the transition when the groom's standing near a bright window. It's not a traditional fade-to-white, but a directional flash. Very interesting.

T.J.
The "flare" you mentoned is white diffusion I added in my NLE. The flash during the scene of the groom looking out the window was a transition named (appropriately) "flash".

Regarding lingering just long enough- I'd glad you noticed that. I always put an big emphasis on pacing throughout my work. I know when "I" would get finished digesting a composition- after that I simply move on to more imagry. There's no reason to lets shots linger longer than, say, a few seconds each. Occasionally I break this rule but for the most part each shot is fairly short.
I find it keeps your senses peaked and interest locked....well at least hopefully.
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Old May 16th, 2005, 03:21 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glen Elliott
I know when "I" would get finished digesting a composition- after that I simply move on to more imagry. There's no reason to lets shots linger longer than, say, a few seconds each.
Glen, How do you accomodate this in your workflow? Do you construct a "composition" and then render it out and then later assemble them all? Or do you lay everything out on the timeline and just work through it sequentially? Or do you anchor key imagery with key sections of the soundtrack?

Just curious. Great work!
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Old May 17th, 2005, 08:25 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Patrick King
Glen, How do you accomodate this in your workflow? Do you construct a "composition" and then render it out and then later assemble them all? Or do you lay everything out on the timeline and just work through it sequentially? Or do you anchor key imagery with key sections of the soundtrack?

Just curious. Great work!
I don't always work in chronological order. I'll find the peaks and crecendos and place the most powerful footage there. I'll often piece it together in patches non-contiguously.

I edit a piece until it is complete- then render it out to AVI. I'll assemble all my rendered AVI sections (pre-ceremony, ceremony, photosession, reception, etc) on one timeline and add markers (for chapter points) and redner to MPG2 from there. Vegas 6 will change this workflow with the inclusion of nestable projects. I'll no longer have to render each section out and make a master timeline. The master timline will simply be comprised of all my projects (or "timelines") for each section. Eliminating the need to pre-render anything to AVI first. It'll save time and valuable HD space.
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Old May 25th, 2005, 02:22 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glen Elliott
Yes when I'm in season I'll actually practice at least two nights a week. I definitly feel it's a skill that has to be practiced and can be improved upon.

This season I'm going to be using the glidecam a great deal more. This piece has 1 glidecam shot can you figure out which one?
Hi Glen,
Just want to know whether you use the 2000 pro or the 4000 pro? with a body-pod for support?? I am starting to shoot wedding and considering getting either the 2000 or 4000. However, I am very concerned how long I can hold the whole thing and the trouble of mounting the camera on and off the stick.
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Old May 25th, 2005, 03:12 AM   #15
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Glen,
Just found the answers to my questions in your older posts. Thanks. Now I have other questions: how long can you practically hold your camera with the glidecam (2000pro, right?) without resting? Do you have to mount the camera on and off many times during your shooting?
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