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Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


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Old October 17th, 2009, 06:29 AM   #1
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Another Newbie Question,

Hi I know you get this all the time and I have researched al ot of the rich information on this forum but somethings confuse me regarding investing in equipment. I have a sony HVR 1000 which I hate. I have only done four weddings which the brides , friends and their families absolutely love but I always feel bad about taking money for the job since I hate the techincal quality of my camera.
1. Regarding the canon 7d or 5d , how can I invest in this camera when it only shoots for 12 minutes? How does one cover brides prep, ceremony and wedding with this? Will special momnets not be lost?
2.Also the EX1 , I gather the qualiy is superb but with limited recording time on the cards, how do I make that work time wise ?
3. Glide track, Glide cam, or steadicam which one is more practical for a newbie to invest in and what is the main diffrence? they all seem to make panning and tracking shots easier.
4. I often read on the forum about videographers leaving cameras unmanned during the wedding. Wont people tip them over? On my four weddings I have always had a friend go with me.
And finally should I just rent cameras until the hard disk version become more affordable?

Thanks so much. Would have posted my video but embarrased especially when compared to Susanto( she's amazing) . I use pinnacle 11. that shows how far behind I am!
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Old October 17th, 2009, 06:46 AM   #2
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Quote:
1. how can I invest in this camera when it only shoots for 12 minutes?
A camera is not an investment, but if you're shooting events which require individual shots that roll on longer than twelve minutes, then you should probably avoid these cameras.

Quote:
2.Also the EX1... with limited recording time on the cards
I don't understand your question. Since the EX1 has two card slots, you can record continuously all day long, swapping cards as you go. And individual cards can hold hours of video, so I wouldn't say that it has "limited" recording time... in fact it's almost the opposite: nearly limitless.

Quote:
3. Glide track, Glide cam, or steadicam which one is more practical for a newbie to invest in
None. Avoid these until you're no longer a newbie.

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4. ...cameras unmanned during the wedding... Wont people tip them over?
Not if you place them where people can't tip them over. Hope this helps,
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Old October 17th, 2009, 12:43 PM   #3
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Thank you Chris, will work on that
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Old October 18th, 2009, 08:23 PM   #4
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Hi Akinola,

I agree with Chris. I would like to express some additional thoughts.

Is there a rental house that is reliable in your area? While you are not booking a lot of weddings I would consider renting until you have enough bookings to actually purchase additional cameras. The exception to this is to own one camera to practice with. The better you know your camera, the better your productions will be.

The EX1 is a great camera, but quite pricey. Are you charging enough on your productions to offset the cost of an EX1? If not, there are several other cameras that do a nice job, yet do not cost as much as the EX1...HMC150, Z5, XH-A1, etc.

As far as the Glidecam, Stedicam type of devices...I totally agree with Chris. Spend your money, but more importantly, spend your time on improving your craft, i.e. shooting, lighting, audio, editing, etc. Once you have a firm foundation, then add the fancy stuff like a Glidecam.

I understand about being embarrassed to post your work, but honestly...asking for a honest critique can really be beneficial. Everyone has to start somewhere, and very few of us started out as masters of our craft, especially me.
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Old October 19th, 2009, 01:12 AM   #5
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May I add to the excellent advice already given the recommendation to read, read and read? Your library is probably as good as anywhere to search because what you need to understand isn't new or groundbreaking and you'll probably find older books there.

Books on cinematography, portraiture and design will give you the grounding and remain as true today as when they were written. Modern video, especially today's miniaturisation has changed some things, like depth of field, but until you understand what that is you won't understand what you've lost.

Similarly, although there are striking instance where the "rules" have been broken, if you're setting up a rush talking head shot, sticking to the 19th century portraiture lighting "rules" of key, fill and back will ensure you don't have a disaster on your hands.

In this way you'll also learn the terminology and can sit back and smile quietly when other newbies get into heated debates arguing about the subtleties in difference between a lap dissolve, dissolve or mix (none, they're the same thing).
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Old October 19th, 2009, 02:17 PM   #6
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Faith & Paul

.
It's my take on Susantos' imagine concept which blew my mind to no end
I used a Sony V1 and a Sony hvr hd1000e, edited it with pinnacle ultimate 11 and power director which I believe seriously limits my creativity.
I think I can do better.
Please critique


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Old October 19th, 2009, 02:34 PM   #7
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I'm sorry I dont think i added the links properly
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Old October 26th, 2009, 10:30 PM   #8
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Hi Akinola:

I think that your on the right track but here are my thoughts on a few things. To me the song didnt quite match the pace of the video. Particualry when there was dancing by the group on the dance floor. They were obviously moving to an upbeat song but the song accompaning the video was very slow. Also, I think that you should consider using a different type of font. They were to cartoonish. In addtion, I think that you should have used a tripod for some of the shots that were in a more controlled enviroment. I think a few minor adjustments will make a big difference. I have found this fourm to be quite useful, and i'm sure that the feedback you get will help take your skills to the next level.
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Old October 27th, 2009, 11:09 PM   #9
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Hi Akinola,

I totally agree with Kevin's thoughts..as for hating your HD1000 camera..we use this exclusively (2) and people are very happy with the results...check it out.. If you learn to use it properly and add lighting, you'll be fine....


Cheers,

Ken
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Old October 28th, 2009, 01:42 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Akinola Williams View Post
4. I often read on the forum about videographers leaving cameras unmanned during the wedding. Wont people tip them over? On my four weddings I have always had a friend go with me.
For my second cam, I mounted the tripod on a dolly. It makes it almost impossible to tip over.
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Old October 28th, 2009, 11:02 AM   #11
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Thanks so much for replying. At a point I was thinking it was so bad that the professionals couldnt be bothered. I really appreciate the input. My titles were too cartoonish, I was trying to be whimsy but i have seen now how that distracts from the professional look. Also I take blame for not using the tripod as I was tring to create glidecam moves by hand and left it at home.
My problem with the HVR HD1000 was the grainy images but you have shown me it can be done.
I am saving up to buy a macpro and final cut pro ,so hopefully will do better in future
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