7D Wedding Videographer - what am I missing? at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Wedding / Event Videography Techniques

Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old February 23rd, 2010, 02:42 PM   #1
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Bay Area
Posts: 522
7D Wedding Videographer - what am I missing?

I've purchase everything I can think to shoot my next wedding in March. Here is a list. Am I missing anything? I do have a Rhode shotgun mic that isn't on that list. I know I need a wide angle lens which I'm considering the Tokina 11-16mm, but do I need another lens or prime lens as well?

Anything else I should get?



http://i49.tinypic.com/n4tm6e.png
Kelly Langerak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 23rd, 2010, 03:04 PM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 231
what is the speed of you memory card?
About mic, you may want to get a wireless as well
__________________
S.O.D.E Wedding Video(NZ): www.sode.co.nz
SiuChung Leung is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 23rd, 2010, 03:07 PM   #3
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Bay Area
Posts: 522
I believe the cards are 30mb/s and i do have a wireless lapel mic to connect to the H4N device.

Link to cards: SanDisk | 16GB Ultra CompactFlash | SDCFH-016G-A11 | B&H Photo
Kelly Langerak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 23rd, 2010, 03:37 PM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Welland, Ontario
Posts: 311
I know I sound like a broken record because I mention this in every post I make, but I believe the ideal lens setup is a 70-200, a 50mm, and a wider-than-50mm fast prime.

If you have more lenses than the 135mm you have listed, then ignore me, but if, in fact, you only have the 135, I would get a 50mm next. 135 is awfully long, and if you go for the Tokina 11-16 then that is an awfully wide range (16-135) that isn't covered. What about preps? You're either going to be leaning against the wall on the other side of the room, or right in everyone's face with some not-so-flattering wide angle distortion.

For what it's worth, everything I shoot is around 50 except for ceremonies and speeches where I'm not as close to the action, which is where a 70-200 comes in. If it were up to me, I would start there. The 50mm f/1.4 is affordable (f/1.8 is downright disposable at its price) and if you get the f/4 non-IS version of the 70-200 you're looking at a quite reasonable price for the pair.

Just my $0.02.
Matthew Craggs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 23rd, 2010, 03:55 PM   #5
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Miami, FL
Posts: 2,933
I was chatting with a Canon rep the other day and he said that Canon recommends UDMA cards with 45mb/s or faster. You can use the slower cards (and many do with no issues), but for rock solid performance that's what Canon recommends.
__________________
Black Label Films
www.blacklabelweddingfilms.com
Travis Cossel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 23rd, 2010, 04:32 PM   #6
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Provo, UT
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew Craggs View Post
...and if you get the f/4 non-IS version of the 70-200 you're looking at a quite reasonable price for the pair.
Matthew,

Do you use the non-IS version? How bad is the jitter? I'll be using my 7D for weddings as well, and as I really want a good long lens to start with (already have a 50mm) I am leery about not buying one with IS. At the same time, the IS lenses are considerably more expensive, and I can get a Canon 70-200mm f/4 non IS lens on eBay for about $450.

Lots of opinions about IS vs. non-IS. Just wondering if, in a wedding setting, with my camera on either a tripod or on a shoulder mount (i.e. Redrock Micro), I can get good clean shots without the IS...
Michael Winget is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 23rd, 2010, 04:47 PM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Bay Area
Posts: 522
@ Matt,

Your right, I need something in the middle. Would you say this is ideal? Or would there be a better option?

Sigma | Normal 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM Autofocus Lens | 310-101
Kelly Langerak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2010, 12:56 AM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Honolulu, HI
Posts: 643
50 is too long for 7D unless you can stand 5+ feet away. I would suggest a 30/35. The sigma 30 is good for those on a budget. You could also pick up the 17-55 2.8 IS from canon for $800 used and be fine or the sigma 24-70 2.8 for about $350.

I shoot with a 35 prime for preps for 95% of the shots. The other 5% is wide and a few telephoto.
Randy Panado is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2010, 07:47 AM   #9
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Welland, Ontario
Posts: 311
I should retract my original reply. 50mm is awfully long on a crop sensor. I'm used to shooting with the 5DII and I suppose it slips my mind just how much 1.6x is. A shorter prime is a more efficient choice, but I still believe it should be paired with a 70-200.

I have a Sigma 24-70 and think it's great. I would personally choose a faster prime over it though, because I find myself wanting something super fast at a reception more than the zoom.

Re: The Sigma 50mm, I haven't used it, but I have heard a couple of people who have remark that it is sharper than the Canon version. Just quickly looking at the specs, the Sigma version can only go to F/16 while the Canon can go to f/22. As much as the lenses are great for low light, you can find yourself shooting is bright sunlight too where you need to close up as much as possible.

Re: IS, to be completely honest, I am not the best person to answer IS questions because I have never turned IS on when shooting video for no other reason than it drains the battery. I have used the f/2.8 on a tripod and monopod. Everything is obviously rock solid on the tripod, and even though it is hard to keep things stable on a monopod, it's doable.

Again, just my two cents. :)
Matthew Craggs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2010, 12:48 PM   #10
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: arlington, texas
Posts: 420
If you plan on doing any handheld stuff, get a lens with IS. Otherwise, don't worry about it.

For weddings you want to travel and compact and light weight as possible right? The 70-200, the Tokina 11-16, and a 24-70 would give you a lot of range (all f2.8). However, I do recommend getting a fast prime or two, like a 50 1.4 or a 24 f2 or 35 f2. Just something a little wide thats faster than 2.8 for those really low light situations. If you are into macro shots, you may want to think about having a lens that can accommodate that as well.

Depending on your shooting style, a follow focus or something get your hands on the lens barrel can be very beneficial.

Do you have a backup pocket recorder for the groom? What about something to haul all of your gear in?
Cody Dulock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2010, 01:30 PM   #11
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Honolulu, HI
Posts: 643
If you can get a lens with IS, do so. At the long end of the zoom range while doing panning or even rack focusing, minor shake is introduced and is all but alleviated with IS on. When shooting monopod, I still use my IS. Technically, you're not supposed to have IS on with any type of stabilization, but it makes for an interesting argument when practical real world situations call for the opposite :).
Randy Panado is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2010, 02:25 PM   #12
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Miami, FL
Posts: 2,933
Totally agree about IS Randy. There's a lot of argument about not using IS while locked down on a tripod, but in reality, it's actually a good thing as long as you aren't doing a lot of panning for creative effect. If you using mostly static shots or shots with little intended movement, IS is the way to go.

I just got into a debate on this during the WEVA online convention and it's amazing how many people were defending the idea of NEVER using IS while on sticks .. even though they had NEVER tried it. d;-)
__________________
Black Label Films
www.blacklabelweddingfilms.com
Travis Cossel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 28th, 2010, 12:38 PM   #13
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Tarzana California
Posts: 75
This Dr-08 comes out in about a month. Should slide right in the grooms jacket.
Tascam DR-08 Portable Recorder*-* Field Recorders- Studio & Recording- PSSL.com

What lapel mic are you using on your H4n?


20gb/hr on CF cards
1 battery per hour.

Looks like you can only shoot 3 hours. I hope its a short wedding :-p
Steven Arbiu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2010, 12:51 AM   #14
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 588
Use a video camera.
John Knight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2010, 08:22 AM   #15
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: arlington, texas
Posts: 420
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travis Cossel View Post
Totally agree about IS Randy. There's a lot of argument about not using IS while locked down on a tripod, but in reality, it's actually a good thing as long as you aren't doing a lot of panning for creative effect. If you using mostly static shots or shots with little intended movement, IS is the way to go.

I just got into a debate on this during the WEVA online convention and it's amazing how many people were defending the idea of NEVER using IS while on sticks .. even though they had NEVER tried it. d;-)
Travis, thats a good point. The 70-200 has two different IS modes, and I believe one of them is for panning. I have not tested this yet though. I just know with the 24-105 when you pan, the image "hickups" every time when the IS is turned on... I don't use IS on a glidecam either for the exact same reason. Maybe I'm the only one experiencing this?
Cody Dulock is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Wedding / Event Videography Techniques

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:56 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network