Clips for review at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Wedding / Event Videography Techniques

Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old July 8th, 2005, 04:06 AM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: St. Petersburg, Fl
Posts: 57
Clips for review

Two clips from my last wedding. Let me know what you think, any kind of critisism would be appriciated. They are my first clips I've shot and edited.

http://www.onespecialmoment.com/Garcia prep.wmv

http://www.onespecialmoment.com/Garcia Highlight.wmv
Ken Hendrickson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 9th, 2005, 03:33 PM   #2
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: St. Petersburg, Fl
Posts: 57
Any comments?
Ken Hendrickson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 10th, 2005, 06:43 PM   #3
Major Player
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 268
Camera movements were a bit shakey; other than that it was OK. Keep up the good work~!
Young Lee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 10th, 2005, 08:08 PM   #4
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: St. Petersburg, Fl
Posts: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Young Lee
Camera movements were a bit shakey; other than that it was OK. Keep up the good work~!
Yea, I deffinately could advantage from a monopod.
Ken Hendrickson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 11th, 2005, 12:09 PM   #5
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 2,898
Hi Ken, thanks for sharing. I commend you on attempting to capture kinetic shots. Too many videographers fall into rut of only shooting very ordinary static shots.
There are a few pointers I can offer to help you continue to develop your handheld style.
1) First of all modify the way you hold the camera. Don't use the traditional hand-in-strap position. I, personally, cradle the camera. Left hand cupping the bottom of the lense hood, with the right hand gripping the right side of the camera underhand. The thumb can rest near the zoom rocker if zooming is required. Granted this isn't the "only" technique but it's one that I feel most comfortable with and feel it gives me more stability and mobility when I execute my moving shots.

2) Once you get your handheld shots fairly smooth- a good dose of slow motion in post can work wonders on an otherwise less than perfect shot. Granted, it's not going to fix large shakes but it will smooth out the small shutters and dips along your shooting path motion.

3) Training. I learned a lot of what I know from a video entitled "Moving Camera Techniques". It's a training video that tailered specifically for getting great results while executing moving shots handheld. The video covers both handheld and shoulder-mount techniques along with some monopod and glidecam techniques as well. More info can be found at:
http://www.tulsaweddingvideos.com/videographers.shtml

4) Practice. I can't stress this enough. Take time to practice your shooting. Maybe even shoot while your going through the motions- that way you can go back and watch the finished results afterward. It may sound ridiculous but I can't tell you how many times I've stood in my kitched, alone, practicing crane, and dolly shots around a chair or plant. As with any other skill or technique ...our shooting can benefit from practice.

Thanks again for sharing- and keep it up! I look forward to seeing more work from you in the future.
Glen Elliott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 11th, 2005, 12:35 PM   #6
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: St. Louis MO
Posts: 44
I liked them also, you are more brave than I am, I have not left the tripod yet and the prospect of doing so scares me to death :)
Ralph Longo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 11th, 2005, 01:18 PM   #7
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: St. Petersburg, Fl
Posts: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glen Elliott
Hi Ken, thanks for sharing. I commend you on attempting to capture kinetic shots. Too many videographers fall into rut of only shooting very ordinary static shots.
There are a few pointers I can offer to help you continue to develop your handheld style.
1) First of all modify the way you hold the camera. Don't use the traditional hand-in-strap position. I, personally, cradle the camera. Left hand cupping the bottom of the lense hood, with the right hand gripping the right side of the camera underhand. The thumb can rest near the zoom rocker if zooming is required. Granted this isn't the "only" technique but it's one that I feel most comfortable with and feel it gives me more stability and mobility when I execute my moving shots.

2) Once you get your handheld shots fairly smooth- a good dose of slow motion in post can work wonders on an otherwise less than perfect shot. Granted, it's not going to fix large shakes but it will smooth out the small shutters and dips along your shooting path motion.

3) Training. I learned a lot of what I know from a video entitled "Moving Camera Techniques". It's a training video that tailered specifically for getting great results while executing moving shots handheld. The video covers both handheld and shoulder-mount techniques along with some monopod and glidecam techniques as well. More info can be found at:
http://www.tulsaweddingvideos.com/videographers.shtml

4) Practice. I can't stress this enough. Take time to practice your shooting. Maybe even shoot while your going through the motions- that way you can go back and watch the finished results afterward. It may sound ridiculous but I can't tell you how many times I've stood in my kitched, alone, practicing crane, and dolly shots around a chair or plant. As with any other skill or technique ...our shooting can benefit from practice.

Thanks again for sharing- and keep it up! I look forward to seeing more work from you in the future.

Thanks for the pointers. I've actually learned a lot from your videos. I normally use the cradle the camera technique, but because there was so much going on, I just forgot and reverted back to the hand in strap style.

I need to start practicing on my 17 month old. If I can manage to keep up with her, I can keep up with anything :D
Ken Hendrickson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 11th, 2005, 02:13 PM   #8
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Cape Town, SA
Posts: 159
Just my few words of advice

Hi Ken

I would like to add my few words of comment and suggestions in the hope that its viewed constructively - as always, this is by no means hard and fast rules, just my viewpoint

The highlight video:

1. Keep your scene visible time a bit longer - the fades happen too quick to capture the moment - specifically here the first shot - you want to capture attention to the moment and what the rest is going to hold.

2. For the MOC shot, I would try and stay a bit wider with the shot, that way you don't have to play "follow the leader" all the time which makes one a bit queasy

3. I would slow my zooms - either practically or in post - snap zooms tend to "hurt" one's eyes. If your camera has a lanc port, think of investing in a controller - the ones from varizoom work well along with the cam on a monopod if hopping off the tripod scares you. Your wedding cake cut was a better example

4. For your "family shot" (at about 1:32 and 3:??) I would have started with a wide shot and then do a slow pan - if time is not on your side, do the pan and then slow it down in post - be carefull for "hosing" the scenes.

5. For the garter throwing scene, I would have used two cameras (if available). one to capture the bride throwing and the second concentrating on picking up on the person who catches the garter with a wider shot and then zooming on the individual.

For your attempt and guts - 10 out of 10. Few "outsiders" realise that shooting a wedding video takes nerve and I know that my first shoot was a nightmare - I had more sweat on my palms than I'm sure the groom had! - focus got wrong etc etc etc. Generally I would like my highlights package to be a bit "slower" - rather showing mood than action!

Keep at it and you can only improve

Cheers
__________________
MJ Productions
Never let the need for money outweigh the need for Quality, Friendly and Professional Service
Jeremy Rochefort is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Wedding / Event Videography Techniques

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:22 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network