To those of you who use vdslrs (5d, 7d, T2i), can you post a pic of your rig? at DVinfo.net

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Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


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Old April 6th, 2010, 03:53 PM   #1
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To those of you who use vdslrs (5d, 7d, T2i), can you post a pic of your rig?

I have a T2i and have not used it in an event yet. Do you guys "beef" up your rig to look more professional? My XH-A1 is my main camera and even though that is on the smaller side for weddings, it still looks pro and am sort of trying to figure out my gameplan for the t2i (I definitely want it for the glamor shots and for my highlight clips).

If you guys can share any pics of your rig, or any rig thats being used for weddings. Brownie points if it costs less than $1k.
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Old April 6th, 2010, 06:03 PM   #2
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Hi Arif,

Personally I'd rather blend in as much as possible. If they've seen your work it shouldn't matter what your equipment looks like. The comments that they never noticed you might be a more valuable compliment than the fact that you had impressive equipment.
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Old April 6th, 2010, 06:36 PM   #3
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Check out this thread: http://www.dvinfo.net/forum/canon-eo...arn-build.html

Mine comes in at $965 including the ZoomH4n, Genus GMB/A bars, Z-Finder and other little trinkets. (not including mic tho)
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Old April 7th, 2010, 05:28 PM   #4
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I'm with Joel. I understand the sentiment to add equipment to the DSLR so that it looks cooler to the client and less like a still camera, but for us functionality is the key. We aren't going to add anything to the camera that we don't need on it. Here's a behind the scenes shot from a 'day after' session in the Bahamas.

Travis Cossel's Photos | Facebook

This is a 7D with a 17-55 2.8 lens with a lens hood and a Rode videomic. We also had a Delkin LCD screen on it but removed it because it gets in the way more than it helps. The way this camera looks in the image is the way it looked when we shot the wedding the day before. No fancy shoulder rigs, matte boxes, viewfinder enhancements, etc. Pretty bare and still quite functional.
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Old April 7th, 2010, 07:11 PM   #5
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Hi Travis,

That is pretty much what I'm running, though I find that its much easier to get good shots with the LCD viewfinder. The camera is surprisingly easy to handhold but most of the time I have it on a monopod or glidecam.
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To those of you who use vdslrs (5d, 7d, T2i), can you post a pic of your rig?-t2i.jpg  
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Old April 8th, 2010, 10:09 AM   #6
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I tried out some viewfinders at WPPI and just felt more restricted by them. I like to shoot from a variety of angles and the viewfinders can be tough to use it seems from some angles. Which model are you using there, the Hoodloupe?

Not to mention I like to transition quickly between handheld .. slider .. Merlin .. etc. Seems like using a viewfinder on a Merlin would be pretty tough.
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Old April 8th, 2010, 10:48 AM   #7
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We generally prefer using an external monitor instead of a viewfinder. So much easier to work on different setups (handheld, steadicam or slider). Here is a pic that was shot recently when we were trying our omnitracker (amazing toy!!).
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To those of you who use vdslrs (5d, 7d, T2i), can you post a pic of your rig?-tracker.jpg  
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Old April 8th, 2010, 11:49 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travis Cossel View Post
I tried out some viewfinders at WPPI and just felt more restricted by them. I like to shoot from a variety of angles and the viewfinders can be tough to use it seems from some angles. Which model are you using there, the Hoodloupe?
LCDVF (beta)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Travis Cossel View Post
Not to mention I like to transition quickly between handheld .. slider .. Merlin .. etc. Seems like using a viewfinder on a Merlin would be pretty tough.
Its connected with magnets in the loupe via a metal piece that frames the LCD and is adhered by double-sided tape*. It comes with a lanyard that is meant to be kept around your neck so you can take off the viewfinder and let it hang around your neck. That didn't work for me so I have the lanyard connected to one side, rolled tightly together, and held that way with a twisty-tie. When I don't want to use the viewfinder I swing it up and over the front of the camera where it rests out of the way. This works great when I use the camera on the glidecam and have balanced it knowing the viewfinder will be there.

* Even though I did everything as instructed the metal rectangle wouldn't stay attached to the camera. I ended up buying a few strips of 3M VHB (Very High Bond) double sided tape and its been rock solid. I just cut some very thin strips with an exacto-blade and let it rest overnight with a weight on it. Not going anywhere now...
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Old April 8th, 2010, 11:59 AM   #9
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Thanks for posting guys. These are some helpful rig photos.
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Old April 8th, 2010, 12:00 PM   #10
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I think the most functional rig for your shooting style is what you should do. For Travis he goes pretty bare bones. Other guys might opt for a matte box, follow focus, etc... depending on how much control and flexibility they want. The type of event you are shooting should probably be a factor as well. If you know your subjects are going to be moving around a lot, a follow focus might be a nice for this. If you plan on doing a lot of outdoor stuff and don't like lens flares, but you want to use ND filters... a matte box might be ideal for that situation.

The loupe really helps see your exposure when shooting outdoors or if you are shooting hand held, can help stabilize your rig more, and the ability to see the focus is a little better.

But, if you are switching from all these different support systems having a loupe that can easily attach/detach would be ideal.

Another option would be to use highlight alert and/or the brightness histogram on the 7D, 550D (not sure if this model has these options), or on the 1D Mark IV. You would have to snap a picture initially to see what your exposure is like though... if you have a 5D, no worries because you have a live histogram.

I'm using a glidecam, tripod, slider, and redrock Captain Stubling/theEvent hyrbid rig when I shoot.
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Old April 8th, 2010, 01:38 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel Peregrine View Post
LCDVF (beta)
Its connected with magnets in the loupe via a metal piece that frames the LCD and is adhered by double-sided tape*. It comes with a lanyard that is meant to be kept around your neck so you can take off the viewfinder and let it hang around your neck. That didn't work for me so I have the lanyard connected to one side, rolled tightly together, and held that way with a twisty-tie. When I don't want to use the viewfinder I swing it up and over the front of the camera where it rests out of the way. This works great when I use the camera on the glidecam and have balanced it knowing the viewfinder will be there.
I think that mine was one of the first production models of the LCDF. The adhesive frame stuck onto the camera with no trouble and has not shown any signs of coming off. One tip I would give is to look through the viewfinder when glueing it on so that you can centre it around the LCD screen accurately (with the frame stuck to the LCDVF by the magnets).
I have a thin lanyard on the camera that I put around my wrist as a failsafe in case I drop it. I don't use a lanyard on the LCDVF. It snaps off and on so easily that I keep it in my pocket except when I am shooting. That way I draw less attention. The magnets keep it secure but knocking it would probably dismount the LCDFV. If it's in my pocket it's safe,
I don't use it with my Merlin.
On top of the 5D I mount a Rode Stereomic. Have got some very acceptable results with that using the autolevels on the camera. It's not for all situations but it works well in some.
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Old April 8th, 2010, 01:55 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel Peregrine View Post
LCDVF (beta)



Its connected with magnets in the loupe via a metal piece that frames the LCD and is adhered by double-sided tape*. It comes with a lanyard that is meant to be kept around your neck so you can take off the viewfinder and let it hang around your neck. That didn't work for me so I have the lanyard connected to one side, rolled tightly together, and held that way with a twisty-tie. When I don't want to use the viewfinder I swing it up and over the front of the camera where it rests out of the way. This works great when I use the camera on the glidecam and have balanced it knowing the viewfinder will be there.

* Even though I did everything as instructed the metal rectangle wouldn't stay attached to the camera. I ended up buying a few strips of 3M VHB (Very High Bond) double sided tape and its been rock solid. I just cut some very thin strips with an exacto-blade and let it rest overnight with a weight on it. Not going anywhere now...
Thanks for the info, Joel.
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Old April 8th, 2010, 03:02 PM   #13
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Old April 9th, 2010, 09:22 AM   #14
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Honestly, the rig is great to have especially for controlled productions like Films, Music Videos, Corporate etc but for weddings, depending on who your target market is. If you are charging people $20-30,000 / wedding than obviously walking in with DSLR and tripod is not going to cut it.

In reality you can make whatever you want with limited tools. And like Travis said, unless you have 4-5 different cameras, each ready for different set up, it's almost impossible to go between slider, steadicam and tripod and monopod shots

:)
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Old April 9th, 2010, 09:37 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jawad Mir View Post
In reality you can make whatever you want with limited tools. And like Travis said, unless you have 4-5 different cameras, each ready for different set up, it's almost impossible to go between slider, steadicam and tripod and monopod shots

:)
That's what they make quick release adapters and plates for, but don't tell anyone... it's a secret! :)
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