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Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


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Old July 19th, 2010, 09:46 PM   #16
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So MAC users out there.. what DVD program do you use to build this kind of menus; One that would allow you to create a chapter to play at a certain minute/part of a video clip?

Does DVD Architect does the job? Sadly it's Windows compatible only, which I probably can manage by installing Windows on my Mac. I just never got around setting it up.

My video was still rendering this morning when I had to leave for work. Hopefully my exporting setting works now that I have a good lesson on HD videos, DVD players compatibility, etc. Thanks all! :)
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Old July 20th, 2010, 07:01 AM   #17
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Mac DVD burn

Hope I can help here. I use a Mac pro to edit my weddings and create DVDs for my clients that approach 1 hr and 40-50 mins.

I shoot with four HD cams and then capture to FCP as ProRes 422 (1440x1080). I then use a slick piece of software called plural eyes to create a multi clip to make editing a breeze. When I'm done I export the 1440x1080 sequence as a QuickTime video using sequence settings and preserving chapter markers. Then it's time for lunch, since the render time on that process can be 3 or 4 hours.

Next step use compressor to create a Dolby digital file for high quality sound and maximum compression.

I make my menus in Apple Motion.

Finally import to Dvd Studio Pro. Set menus and tracks to 16:9 pan and scan. Let it burn. You'll have an sd DVD that is very hard to distinguish in quality from HD and you'll only have used the FCP suite.

Steve Pustay
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Old July 24th, 2010, 02:10 AM   #18
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I've tried exporting to h264 but that doesnt seem to be recognized by DVD Studio Pro. Should I export to MPEG-2 using Compressor? If so, what's the best setting? I see with 8000 kBps I only get a 1 hour worth of DVD, which is not enough as my single footage is over 1.5 hour :(

What's the best export setting in Compressor for burning using DVD Studio Pro?
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Old July 24th, 2010, 03:52 AM   #19
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Johannes, in my view there is only one solution, a dual layer disk. Why would anyone consider throwing away quality when there's a perfectly acceptable alternative?
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Old July 24th, 2010, 07:03 AM   #20
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Johannes, in my view there is only one solution, a dual layer disk. Why would anyone consider throwing away quality when there's a perfectly acceptable alternative?
Many domestic DVD players have problems playing burned dual-layer DVD. The discs themselves are more expensive plus the write speed is lower so that they take much longer to create. Isn't it just easier & better to stick to multiple single-layer discs?
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Old July 24th, 2010, 07:29 AM   #21
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Nigel, I've never encountered any problems myself so playing problems have not been an issue for me.

I write my disks in a 7-up duplicator with byte-for-byte checking independently on each disk so any difference in write speed is negligible and the additional blanks costs are passed on to the client.

I would rather accept any of these inconveniences than degrade my work, and dropping the bitrate does just that. With upscaling players now and goodness only what within the life of the product plus pride in my work mean that quality comes first for me. But I know people locally who happily deliver DVDs encoded at 4000kbps so some clients evidently don't notice or don't care.

Perhaps I should add that at wedding fairs I only show full HD demos on the screens for exactly the same reasons.
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Old July 24th, 2010, 11:59 AM   #22
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Philip, I wasn't suggesting delivering poor quality lower bitrate DVDs. I too use 8000Kbps but would just avoid dual-layer by giving the customer two single-layer discs. Two or more disks will only require one PPL/MCPS LM licence:-)
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Old July 24th, 2010, 12:14 PM   #23
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Nigel, I didn't consider that option - perfectly valid of course - for two reasons. Firstly we already give the client two disks - the programmes and the DVD they shoot on honeymoon using the camera we lend them for free. Secondly, although I'm no expert, I thought the PPL licence was per disk.
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Old July 25th, 2010, 08:58 AM   #24
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Secondly, although I'm no expert, I thought the PPL licence was per disk.
As far as I understand it there is one licence required per production. They explicitly do not refer to a licence per disk & in fact don't refer to disks as such for the licence can cover as per the website
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CD, cassette, minidisk, vinyl, DAT, DVD, Blu-ray disk, HD-DVD, VHS, CD-Rom or any other physical format notified by us.
You pay for a licence per 'Product'.
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Old July 25th, 2010, 09:38 PM   #25
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Nigel, whilst I don't disagree with your interpretation of the terms you quote, the terms also specifically state "The licences are in the form of holographic stickers, which must be applied to all copies of the video." Since the stickers are priced individually it would seem to me that if your product covers two disks you need two stickers.
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Old July 26th, 2010, 12:56 AM   #26
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Nigel, whilst I don't disagree with your interpretation of the terms you quote, the terms also specifically state "The licences are in the form of holographic stickers, which must be applied to all copies of the video." Since the stickers are priced individually it would seem to me that if your product covers two disks you need two stickers.
The PPL holographic stickers are supposed to be stuck on the case not on the disc as that could cause playback errors.
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Old July 26th, 2010, 01:38 AM   #27
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Nigel, of course, but with respect, this is a detail - and a long way from whether it was preferable to lower the bitrate and jeopardise the image quality or use a dual layer disk. I could and possibly should remind readers that the licences we're writing about apply only to UK-produced and UK-exhibited programmes.
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Old July 26th, 2010, 02:02 AM   #28
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Steven,

I liked your MAC explanation. But What is the advantage of "Plural Eyes" over simply making a multiclip from your 4 cams in Final Cut Pro?

You mentioned it made editing much easier....any details are appreciated,

John Reilly

Last edited by John Reilly; July 26th, 2010 at 02:03 AM. Reason: Typo.
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Old August 4th, 2010, 03:58 PM   #29
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Because I don't have time code synched cams., I need to synch by a matching in point. Finding that common in point can sometimes be difficult if all the cams are not focused on exactly the same thing. ( I usually use a camera flash or some other event or at last resort a common sound). Plural eyes is an inexpensive piece of software that analyzes the audio tracks of the four cams and automatically synch them. By the time I go get a cup of coffee from the kitchen, I've got a perfectly synched multi track.

Not a required element for FCP multitrack work, but very cool!

Steve Pustay
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Old August 5th, 2010, 04:19 AM   #30
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Steve, sometimes I record audio on a digital recorder and sync it in post edit. However, the speed is usually slightly different from audio recorded from my camera. Usually after 5-7 minutes it became out of sync slightly and I have to re-sync the audio again.

With this software, will it also adjust the speed if necessary? Have you ever had issue where the audio you try to sync is at a slightly different speed?
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