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Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


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Old August 5th, 2005, 08:46 AM   #1
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How do you deliver?

As you may know, I'm new to wedding video. I have shot, but have yet to deliver, my first wedding video. My second wedding is coming up in two weeks.

Of course I want to provide the video on DVD, but do you also give the B&G a VHS copy? The reason I ask is because I am concerned about the compatibility of DVD-R as well as the longevity. For all of its faults, VHS is more compatible, and if stored properly, will last a long time.

Also, do you keep an archive copy for the client? If so, for how long?
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Old August 5th, 2005, 09:13 AM   #2
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I'm fairly new to this as well. I create a data DVD that contains all the the final rendered MPEG2 files, the DVD layout file, and any menu pictures or background music used in the authoring process. I would like to keep the original .avi files and the VEG files, but they are too large. I also keep a spare copy of the actual DVD to make copies of in the future, if requested. Then I can clear all the data off my HDD for the next event. Hope this helps.
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Old August 5th, 2005, 09:56 AM   #3
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Deliver the DVD and let them know that a VHS copy is available for a small extra charge. It's extra trouble for you and should be a source of additional income. Besides if they really want a VHS version, they will likely make their own or have a friend do it.
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Old August 5th, 2005, 10:25 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Davis
Also, do you keep an archive copy for the client? If so, for how long?
First, as far as DVD-R goes, you should be okay. I've only ever experienced problems with a DVD+R I received for a review.

I include an insert in my DVD packaging pointing clients to a website with known player issues. All they have to do is check the list if they have problems. I've only ever had 1 person say that their player was on the list as "OK" but they had playback problems. He ended up swapping discs with his FIL and that was that.

I maintain a DVcam archive of ALL jobs, indefinately. Never know when I might need to go back to something. (I still have camera originals dating back to 1992!)

I also maintain 2 copies of the final DVD. An archive and a viewing copy. If the viewing copy should go bad, I'll burn a new one. Again, never know what a potential client may want to see.
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Old August 7th, 2005, 09:16 AM   #5
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Tim,

Quote:
I would like to keep the original .avi files and the VEG files, but they are too large.
You can save your edited .avi files by re-recording them back to your miniDV unit using Vegas.. I've heard people comment that re-recording back to tape is preferrable than compressing the recording to MPEG2 and trying to edit a spot or a scene, then re-compress *again* back into another MPEG2 so that it can be burned back onto DVD..

I have not tested this theory out - but it makes sense to a degree that you'll get *less* Loss of quality by re-recording than you would compressing the video into MPEG2..

I'm curious if anyone else does this and what their experience has been.. I've taken shots and compressed them into MPEG2 then try to edit them later - and recompress ... and I wasn't very pleased with the results.....

Good luck!
-Michael
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Old August 7th, 2005, 11:00 AM   #6
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Here is what I do.

I make a DVD for my archives. I make a DVCAM master of each segment for my archives. I also put a .img file for the finished DVD onto a removable drive. This is by far the most useful thing I do.

A 250gig external HD can be had for about $150. Even is you had a 4gig .img file (usually more like 2.5) you can store 60+ DVD's on one drive. When the client calls in a panic wanting more copies, simply attached the correct backup drive and start burning .img files. Quick, easy and painless. No reimporting tape and such.

Mike
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Old August 7th, 2005, 09:22 PM   #7
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like Mike,

i keep a copy of the dvd, a digtal8 master straight off the timeline and an image of the DVD.
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Old August 17th, 2005, 10:01 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael McGruder
Tim,



You can save your edited .avi files by re-recording them back to your miniDV unit using Vegas.. I've heard people comment that re-recording back to tape is preferrable than compressing the recording to MPEG2 and trying to edit a spot or a scene, then re-compress *again* back into another MPEG2 so that it can be burned back onto DVD..

I have not tested this theory out - but it makes sense to a degree that you'll get *less* Loss of quality by re-recording than you would compressing the video into MPEG2..

I'm curious if anyone else does this and what their experience has been.. I've taken shots and compressed them into MPEG2 then try to edit them later - and recompress ... and I wasn't very pleased with the results.....

Good luck!
-Michael
As a Premier Pro User.. I trim down the final project and it's usually 6-8gb usually and then I put it onto a 40GB DLT tape.. Most of the time I can fit 4-5 projects on 1 tape..
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Old August 18th, 2005, 02:11 AM   #9
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Ususally I'll just make a DVD copy of all the master files and place them in a CD wallet for archiving. I have three 200 capacity ones so far, I guess I have around 30 or so projects in each one.
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Old August 18th, 2005, 04:23 AM   #10
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Hi Pat,

had you ever problems with trimmed Premiere Pro projects? I remember my first and last try with Premiere 6.5 ended in a huge mess - half of the clips were linked to the wrong files so I couldn't edit them any more. I finally deleted the whole thing.
I scared to trim down my Pro 1.5 projects, but if it works fine by now... it would be a nice and ready-to-edit backup!

Andreas
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Old August 18th, 2005, 12:20 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Davis
As you may know, I'm new to wedding video. I have shot, but have yet to deliver, my first wedding video. My second wedding is coming up in two weeks.

Of course I want to provide the video on DVD, but do you also give the B&G a VHS copy? The reason I ask is because I am concerned about the compatibility of DVD-R as well as the longevity. For all of its faults, VHS is more compatible, and if stored properly, will last a long time.

Also, do you keep an archive copy for the client? If so, for how long?
I stopped even offering VHS about 2 years ago. I'll fullfill a request if a client needs something on VHS but it's not something I want to spend a lot of time on, on a regular basis.

I always burn -R's which are supposed to have better reliability. Thus far, knock on wood, I've never had a couple that couldn't play my DVDs.

Another good suggestion is to include handling instructions as a DVD insert as well. Describing the many points to be aware of including the #1 cause of DVD decay.....bending/twisting the disc. Whether it be when they remove the disc from the hub or what have you- any time the disc is bent or twisted it can create tiny microscopic cracks which allow oxygen to enter the data layer of the DVD. Once this happens disc decay is accelerated a considerable amount.
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Old August 18th, 2005, 03:10 PM   #12
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Chris,

Did you say VHS has longevity? ..and it "will last a long time?" You sound a bit confus--ED. VHS will degrade over time just sitting on a shelf not being played. And if you play it regularly - forget it - audio loss, warps, tracking bands, color loss. Longevity and VHS should not even be spoken in the same sentence my young padawon.

VHS is dead and buried. I haven't even had a request for VHS in over 3 years.

Compatibility is no issue - use DVD-R. I've sent out well over 150 DVD-Rs with only one call back about a disc not being able to play. I told them... "your Aunts DVD player must be one of the earlier DVD players which was not fully compliant with the current DVD standard. Early in the evolution of DVD, some manufacturers rushed players to market before the DVD standard was finalized knowing their players were not fully compliant. The solution is to buy her any new DVD player at Wal-Mart or BestBuy for as little as $30." That was the solution and it fixed the problem.

wow, someone had to shell out $30 for a DVD player ...as if that was a monumental problem.

Please forgive my sarcasm.
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Old August 19th, 2005, 01:14 PM   #13
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Right now, this is our routine:
No VHS unless they beg.
Keep a DVD copy in case a prospective client wants to see an actual wedding.
Deliver on DVD-R. (Avoid stick on labels)
Copy m2v and wav files to DVD for archive.
Copy all project files except avi to disc.
Delete all project files after 30 days.
Keep original tapes forever.
Optional-copy edited movie avi to tape.
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Old August 19th, 2005, 01:30 PM   #14
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Thanks for all the great info, guys. I think I over-estimated the durability of VHS, and under-estimated the compatibility of DVD-R. I also like the idea of keeping project files on removable drives.

BTW, I leave my day job at the end of the month and officially launch "Famous Davis Productions" on September 5th. Wish me luck!
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Old August 20th, 2005, 09:07 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Magbanua
like Mike,

i keep a copy of the dvd, a digtal8 master straight off the timeline and an image of the DVD.
Jason! kabayan...kumusta? welcome to dvinfo. ph-video is a bit quiet that's why I lurk here. Really find lots of interesting ideas here.

sorry glen OB: just wanted to welcome Jason on this site... :)

as for the thread-related answer, I would probably keep an image file on dvd, a copy of edited dvd and raw miniDV.
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