Lessons Learnt - From that first wedding - Page 4 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Wedding / Event Videography Techniques

Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old September 7th, 2011, 02:11 PM   #46
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: San Antonio TX
Posts: 157
Re: Lessons Learnt - From that first wedding

Joe, that's the downside to the DSLR for run-n-gun...especially if you're a single shooter. It's definitely possible, but you definitely need to incorporate a second camera and/or shooter. If you're a single shooter with a bag of lenses, you're setting yourself up for major problems. Zoom lenses definitely are the answer, however you lose speed, and thus a bit of your desired "shallow depth-of-field" look. Then you might as well be using a video camera.

As far as the photographer thing, it's best to meet up with them prior to the ceremony, get a good rapport with them, and discuss each other's strategies to best suit each other's needs. The photographer generally gets a little more leniency in positioning since the couple is typically more concerned about their photos. This doesn't mean, however, that they are to dominate the perimeter. If you're a single shooter, it's best to "join the photographer at the hip" in this case. Stay close by to them, that way you're equally getting the best shots without getting into each other's way. Good photographers, if they see that you know what you're doing, will typically share the perimeter with you, as there's a mutual understanding and knowledge of what the other is doing.

It definitely would help to place an audio recorder at the altar, if the situation allows. I've always just used audio from my shotgun mic.

Less is definitely better, on a number of levels. An overload in both gear and thought can divert your attention from what really matters.

Nevertheless, I'm glad everything for the most part worked out.
__________________
Edward Mendoza, Videographer/Editor, TEXAS VIDEO PRODUCTION
www.texasvideoproduction.us

Last edited by Edward Mendoza; September 7th, 2011 at 04:05 PM.
Edward Mendoza is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 16th, 2011, 09:01 AM   #47
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ireland
Posts: 70
Re: Lessons Learnt - From that first wedding

Hi Edward,

Point taking regarding Photographer. And I intend to receive a running order of events plus vendor contact detail prior to events

But regarding your first point, I really do know the importance of a second camera & shooter, which is why i bought a second tripod prior to the event, and rented a 7D. But my problems on the day, really did stem from the rented 7D, which i wasn't used to & prevented me from dialling down the f/spot during ceremony, and caused card write errors during reception, so i was prob substituting lenses more than i intended.

The other major problem was bad positioning on my part, which meant i was stupidly using a manfrotto during ceremony, hence all shaky footage.

Here's the clip anyway. I've ordered a couple of H1's since, and a 70-200, which will took a huge hit on the bank balance, but you underestimate the importance of close ups & detail, when trying to convey emotion.

I've also posted this in the relevant section, incase anyone would like to offer suggestions on how i can avoid the flickering, and what i should be doing (in camera), when the speeches are in front of a window

Joe Thompson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 16th, 2011, 09:06 AM   #48
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ireland
Posts: 70
Re: Lessons Learnt - From that first wedding

Also, let the long talky bits in this clip, (i.e. the grooms's speech) be a lesson to other newbies out there, and a reason why you should have that second camera, or ideally a third camera. It's long and boring, but as I'd only a single camera at that stage, i really don't have any other appropriate footage that i can use.
Joe Thompson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 16th, 2011, 09:37 AM   #49
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 8,222
Re: Lessons Learnt - From that first wedding

Hi Joe

Nice footage!! I really dunno how you guys with DSLR's find the time to get the right content AND adjust exposure and focus at the same time!!!! At pressure times like these when you already are stretched to your limit I still like the fact I can snap my cam (or both of them) into full auto and concentrate on what I'm shooting as long as the circumstances permit!!!

Windows can be a curse and really, the only sensible thing one can do is go in for a tighter shot and expose for the face ..the window will be washed out of course ..otherwise if there are curtains I just close 'em!! Doing longwinded speeches with one cam is tough!! I usually have one cam on the speaker and then use the second cam for cutaways...when the best man thanks the bridesmaids viewers actually expect a cutaway of the bridesmaids!!

The windows might have been a curse but they also gave you light for other shots..something that's usually severely lacking at receptions!! Each wedding will have a new challenge for you that you will need to figure out and get right..that's what makes it interesting!!!

Keep up the good work

Chris
Chris Harding is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 17th, 2011, 07:17 AM   #50
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ireland
Posts: 70
Re: Lessons Learnt - From that first wedding

Hi Christ,

Thanks a mill! Already looking forward to the next one. Also sorry about your loss to ireland in the rugby world cup today :-)

Some good advise there. I definitely put emphasis and focus on the view, which was a sensational setting, and wanted to convey this in the piece, rather than just the standard function room, which it may have looked like, had the curtains been closed. One thing is for sure, in ireland anyway, there would have been first degree murder, and the Irish wedding market would have been one vendor less, had i closed those curtains.

I have a 70-200 on the way, which I can't wait to play around with. The wife is going to get no attention for the next few weeks :-). I think this will improve the mentioned mistakes, allowing me to frame better, and get in close on the speaker, especially if there's a bright window behind. I did assume though, that i would have been able to fix in post production, as long as the background wasn't overexposed.

Unfortunately, I encountered write errors on the memory card with the rented 7D during speeches, so the one camera setup for speeches was not by choice, believe me :-)

A second shooter really would make things so much easier, as in all honest, it's impossible to get creative, and capturing|telling the story is a job in itself.
Joe Thompson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 17th, 2011, 09:29 AM   #51
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 8,222
Re: Lessons Learnt - From that first wedding

Hi Joe

I only use a second shooter if I'm doing bride prep and groom prep and they are at the same time!! Sometimes she does cutaways at the ceremony but rarely attends the reception. Just remember you have to find someone with the same passion as you for weddings ...ideally a wife is the answer but most wives have other interests!

Maybe you need to talk seriously with Jeff Harper ..he runs 4 x DSLR's at weddings all on his own!! so it is possible although I wouldn't like to do what he does!!!

Also remember a 2nd shooter eats into your profits, the more experienced they are the more you have to pay them!! I can comfortably run two cameras all by myself!! The only real time you need two is during the ceremony and during the speeches..apart from those two the shoot only needs a single camera but there are times (like bridal entrance when I have one cam on the MC and the other shoots the bridal party coming in) when you can use two on your own again!! Working alone does have big advantages as you get exactly what you want and don't have to edit strange footage from someone else, correct exposure and a host of things where your second shooter hasn't produced what you expected!!

Congrats on the win by Ireland..I'm on the West Coast so Rugby isn't big here..the East Coast are crazy about it..we were busy watching the Aussie Rules footy semi-final!!

Good luck on the next one!!

Chris
Chris Harding is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Wedding / Event Videography Techniques

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:19 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network