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Old September 26th, 2005, 11:37 AM   #1
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fishing video

I am going to shoot a fishing video for a salmon guide in november. Any tips for outdoor gigs like this. I do not have a real pro camera yet, I will be using my gs150. I will deliver a dvd for the guide to use as marketing tool and some windows media and real player files for emailing to clients instead of pictures.
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Old September 26th, 2005, 12:20 PM   #2
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Sounds like a fun shoot, Eugene! Hope the following isn’t too elementary, but sometimes it’s good to cover some basics, just as a reminder.

Shoot more than what you think you’ll use: Good establishing shots, a little from the bank, some from the boat—if there are two boats be sure and shoot from one of them alongside the guide's boat. And the more close-ups the better. I’ve learned from folks around here that you can’t have too many cutaway shots (for interest, and to cover mistakes).

Audio is crucial on a deal like this. You’ve probably got a wireless lav. Voiceovers also work well with ambient audio from your location mic eased in there. If you try to use just your onboard mic you’ll get a ton of water, wind, and motor noise.

Stabilizing your camera could be tricky on the boat. Don’t know anything about the gs150—does it have an image stabilizer? You might want to peruse the “Support Your Local Camera” forum for tips on that.

By November (are you in the Northwest?) it might be getting cold and damp. Be sure to let your camera acclimate.

I’ve not shot a fishing video but did a fun one on a jet boat in whitewater. If you need any help…. :)
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Old September 26th, 2005, 12:24 PM   #3
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fishing video

Thank you for the feed back, I did not say it in my first post but we will be wadding, we will be in new york.
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Old September 26th, 2005, 12:25 PM   #4
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Hi Eugene

I've shot over 30 short fishing videos in the last 2 years... and one longer 1hour30 film.

tips wise...
I shoot all scenic stuff on a tripod... I like to mix a few pans and subtle zooms to add interest... focus pulls and close up cut aways to make the editing easier....
I shoot most of the action hand held... often using a clip or boom mic on the talent to get a commentary. After an establishing shot of the angler in action or playing a fish, I like to mix up close ups of the reels, hands, expressions... fish in the water and being landed... trophy shots and weighing etc.. and in our case releasing.

I often add a quick interview with the angler on his techniques and catches....

I edit this with some background music tot finish the film....
You can see these in the video zone of my internet site...

Tight Lines

Gareth
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Old September 26th, 2005, 12:30 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eugene Bare
Thank you for the feed back, I did not say it in my first post but we will be wadding, we will be in new york.
Oops!!! LOL! Sorry for wasting your time!

Hey, Gareth--that is wonderful advice!
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Old September 26th, 2005, 01:24 PM   #6
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dont worry

You did not waste my time there was value in your feed back. thanks again.
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Old September 26th, 2005, 01:43 PM   #7
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Don't forget a rain cover for your camera. I use a portabrace rainslicker for my XL - I've shot in pouring rain for several hours and my camcorder was nice and dry. Some of the best fishing can be in "bad" weather. I also use a monopod for my fishing vids - makes shooting a little less tiring, but is still more mobile than a tripod. A lavalier mike seems to be the ticket and I switch to the onboard mike for ambient sound and mix it in post. Ideally, it would be nice to have two lavaliers and someone to work a boom, but it's not necessary.
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Old September 26th, 2005, 02:16 PM   #8
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Last edited by Gareth Watkins; September 26th, 2005 at 02:23 PM. Reason: accidental post
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Old September 26th, 2005, 02:21 PM   #9
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Hi guys

I've found fishing somewhat unpredictable... I usually mic up the main angler with a radio lav and use an on board shot gun for ambient.. if I have only two guys this usally works fine.... the lav will pick up the second guy's voice and the shot gun seems to add the rest quite well..
Unless I have a dedicated sound guy ... which is not often... these work fine...(You can tweek the sound levels in post)

I use an Audio Technica 897 on camera or on the boom... and a Senheiser G100 lav set up...
Camera this year was a Sony FX1 with a Signvideo XLR adapter.

I've not found camera movement too much of a problem on a moving subject.. handheld with the camera stabliser works just fine for me...youdon't really notice the camera movement on action...
Scenics however demand a tripod... wobbly scene shots just look crap to me...

Rain covers are a good tip... but the heavy ones are a pain to fit and to use on a small camera and impede the useage... I usually avoid shooting in the rain in any case, your pictures will be crap anyway... but occassionally I'll add an old Nikon still camera rain cover in an emergency... light after all is what makes a film. so personally for the poor quality video produced it is not worth risking ruining my camera for....
I'll wait for good weather.. can take a couple of days... but most of my shoots last that anyway.. waiting for the fish to play ball...


Tight Lines

Gareth
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Old September 26th, 2005, 02:25 PM   #10
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Gear for fishing videos

If you're on a boat, wear a life vest. It sounds obvious, but when it's "fish on!" you're going to be focusing (no pun intended) on capturing the action, not what's around your feet, behind you, next to you, etc. Your own safety is worth far more than your gear, and if you go overboard, you want to able to tell the tale (and file a claim with your insurance company to get a new camera!)

In a boat or not, I highly recommend putting a lav mic on the guide, and if you've got two (or can borrow a second), put the other on the main client. Then, put a decent boom mic on your camera with a wind screen. Sound will probably be your biggest 'quality' challenge.

Put a polarizing filter on your camera if possible.

Get your establishing and secondary shots of the boat and the gear before you go out. Worry about the action and interesting dialog (uh-hum!) while fishing. If you have time and tape, get more establishing and secondary shots of the boat and gear when you're all done. Get "interview" type responses from the guide and anglers; ask them to talk about the day they just had and how much fun it was. There's no better advertising for a guide than happy customers.

Wear sunscreen.

It's good to get reaction shots from the successful anglers. Get close and get good audio; that moment won't be repeated so be sure you're up close and have that little red "REC" flashing in the corner of your viewfinder. ;-)

On boats, I've always gone hand-held. I found a safe and comfortable spot in the bow and used zoom to get closer to the action while physically staying out of the way when things get hot. If your subject is wading, use a tripod you don't mind getting wet (at least the feet anyway). Wear waders yourself so you don't have to worry so much about where you step if you actually get down into the water (your camera's insured, right?)
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Old September 26th, 2005, 04:03 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Williamson
If you're on a boat, wear a life vest. It sounds obvious, but when it's "fish on!" you're going to be focusing (no pun intended) on capturing the action, not what's around your feet, behind you, next to you, etc.

Wear waders yourself so you don't have to worry so much about where you step if you actually get down into the water (your camera's insured, right?)
Eugene,

Steve covered most it, but I would add that if you are not every experianced in wading in water with waders, get out and practice. Pretty sure that if you are in the water in NY in November, you will be wearing them. When you are wading in a stream with the water flowing, it is easy to get your feet swept out from under you. You will basically be shuffling your feet to keep this from happening, and that is when you will hit a rock or a hole and possibly loose your balance. Walking in them is hard enough, but making quick moves to catch your balance is very very hard. Some practice will quickly show you what you will face.

Good Luck,
Mike
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Old September 27th, 2005, 09:09 AM   #12
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Thanks

Thank you all for your time and input on what details I may need to address. I have alot to do before my shoot. Wadding practice, sound issues, check insurance needs etc. etc.
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